Author Topic: aeration ideas  (Read 623 times)

Offline 4swan

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #15 on: July 02, 2019, 07:40:16 PM »
I have been using a siphon spray wort aerator for the last few years and have been happy with that.  It is a little piece of plastic that sticks in the end of your hose.  It looks like the current price is about $4.  I have not done any experiments to see if it is any better than anything else.  It does no worse than the aquarium pump I retired years ago.

Offline coolman26

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aeration ideas
« Reply #16 on: July 02, 2019, 07:42:32 PM »
TMonk on here used the Venturi practice at his intial brewery. Easy way to aerate on the way to the fermenter.
I read somewhere back in the Lodo threads, that Brian checked the DO without any added O2 @ 6ppm?  Not sure of the exact #, but I took it as it was sufficient as is to pitch. Since then I’ve retired my stone and tank. I do pump to the fermenter at nearly full blast from the CFC. I think if I were still draining by valve or cane, I’d look into adding a Venturi. Splash it if nothing else and call it a day. I think pitching healthy active yeast is key. If your not pitching active yeast, I’m sure the DO number is falling before the yeast gets going. Sorry I can’t remember the numbers he took with his DO meter.


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« Last Edit: July 02, 2019, 08:08:59 PM by coolman26 »
Jeff B

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #17 on: July 02, 2019, 07:45:00 PM »
LMonk on here used the Venturi practice at his intial brewery. Easy way to aerate on the way to the fermenter.
I read somewhere back in the Lodo threads, that Brian checked the DO without any added O2 @ 6ppm?  Not sure of the exact #, but I took it as it was sufficient as is to pitch. Since then I’ve retired my stone and tank. I do pump to the fermenter at nearly full blast from the CFC. I think if I were still draining by valve or cane, I’d look into adding a Venturi. Splash it if nothing else and call it a day. I think pitching healthy active yeast is key. If your not pitching active yeast, I’m sure the DO number is falling before the yeast gets going. Sorry I can’t remember the numbers he took with his DO meter.


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I don't know about that... I thought it was more like 3-4, with just splashing vigorously. After a 1hr rest in the kettle in the perfect world you would get 2ppm though surface diffusion, however I see considerably less than that on my setup (100ppb). I would not ditch that stone...
« Last Edit: July 02, 2019, 07:48:35 PM by The Beerery »

Offline coolman26

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #18 on: July 02, 2019, 08:08:15 PM »
LMonk on here used the Venturi practice at his intial brewery. Easy way to aerate on the way to the fermenter.
I read somewhere back in the Lodo threads, that Brian checked the DO without any added O2 @ 6ppm?  Not sure of the exact #, but I took it as it was sufficient as is to pitch. Since then I’ve retired my stone and tank. I do pump to the fermenter at nearly full blast from the CFC. I think if I were still draining by valve or cane, I’d look into adding a Venturi. Splash it if nothing else and call it a day. I think pitching healthy active yeast is key. If your not pitching active yeast, I’m sure the DO number is falling before the yeast gets going. Sorry I can’t remember the numbers he took with his DO meter.


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I don't know about that... I thought it was more like 3-4, with just splashing vigorously. After a 1hr rest in the kettle in the perfect world you would get 2ppm though surface diffusion, however I see considerably less than that on my setup (100ppb). I would not ditch that stone...
From the source, thanks for the correction. I’m not sure where the 6 came from. I hope I’m getting around 6.


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Offline denny

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #19 on: July 02, 2019, 08:33:04 PM »


I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

I'm the same.  I don't go out of my way to oxygenate the wort, pumping it in seems to do the trick.
But for us simple folk who don't have no fancy pumps or nuthin...

Let the wort fall into the fermenter.  Before I had a pump I used a pitcher to scoop wort put of the kettle and xfer it to the fermenter.  Use your head, don't fall prey to dogma.  There's more than one way to do things, as you well know.

Another variation I like is one I think Goose uses.  Some people put a length of pipe or tubing with a bunch of tiny holes drilled on the end of their siphon hose or however they transfer, so the wort sprays out into the fermenter.  All of these ideas will work.  (The only problem I have with them is when I do low oxygen brews, which I'm doing more of, at least with my lagers now.  Then I like to gently run the wort onto the yeast in the fermenter and only then oxygenate.   But that's quibbling beyond the scope of this topic.)

I used one of those venture aerator for a few years.  There was nothing difference when I stopped using it.  I think it's one of those things that people think should make a difference but have never really tested.
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Offline coolman26

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #20 on: July 02, 2019, 09:36:58 PM »


I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

I'm the same.  I don't go out of my way to oxygenate the wort, pumping it in seems to do the trick.
But for us simple folk who don't have no fancy pumps or nuthin...

Let the wort fall into the fermenter.  Before I had a pump I used a pitcher to scoop wort put of the kettle and xfer it to the fermenter.  Use your head, don't fall prey to dogma.  There's more than one way to do things, as you well know.

Another variation I like is one I think Goose uses.  Some people put a length of pipe or tubing with a bunch of tiny holes drilled on the end of their siphon hose or however they transfer, so the wort sprays out into the fermenter.  All of these ideas will work.  (The only problem I have with them is when I do low oxygen brews, which I'm doing more of, at least with my lagers now.  Then I like to gently run the wort onto the yeast in the fermenter and only then oxygenate.   But that's quibbling beyond the scope of this topic.)

I used one of those venture aerator for a few years.  There was nothing difference when I stopped using it.  I think it's one of those things that people think should make a difference but have never really tested.
I’ve never used one myself actually. I remember Leos used a Venturi for in-line aeration when he started his brewery. The idea has always stuck with me since then.


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Offline coolman26

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #21 on: July 02, 2019, 09:57:16 PM »
LMonk on here used the Venturi practice at his intial brewery. Easy way to aerate on the way to the fermenter.
I read somewhere back in the Lodo threads, that Brian checked the DO without any added O2 @ 6ppm?  Not sure of the exact #, but I took it as it was sufficient as is to pitch. Since then I’ve retired my stone and tank. I do pump to the fermenter at nearly full blast from the CFC. I think if I were still draining by valve or cane, I’d look into adding a Venturi. Splash it if nothing else and call it a day. I think pitching healthy active yeast is key. If your not pitching active yeast, I’m sure the DO number is falling before the yeast gets going. Sorry I can’t remember the numbers he took with his DO meter.


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I don't know about that... I thought it was more like 3-4, with just splashing vigorously. After a 1hr rest in the kettle in the perfect world you would get 2ppm though surface diffusion, however I see considerably less than that on my setup (100ppb). I would not ditch that stone...
10/4, the stone will be back for 90sec @ 12.5g. I went back through my notebook. That was my SOP before not using it. I didn’t see anything negative happen fortunately.


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Offline Thirsty_Monk

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #22 on: July 02, 2019, 09:59:09 PM »


I used a wine degasser for years and it worked great,  so if you've got one  go for it.  To tell you the truth, I don't do any specific aeration any more.  With dry yeast, you don't need it.  With liquid yeast I pitch a healthy, active starter.  Between that and pumping to the fermenter, it just isn't necessary for me.  Heresy?  Maybe but also pragmatic.

I'm the same.  I don't go out of my way to oxygenate the wort, pumping it in seems to do the trick.
But for us simple folk who don't have no fancy pumps or nuthin...

Let the wort fall into the fermenter.  Before I had a pump I used a pitcher to scoop wort put of the kettle and xfer it to the fermenter.  Use your head, don't fall prey to dogma.  There's more than one way to do things, as you well know.

Another variation I like is one I think Goose uses.  Some people put a length of pipe or tubing with a bunch of tiny holes drilled on the end of their siphon hose or however they transfer, so the wort sprays out into the fermenter.  All of these ideas will work.  (The only problem I have with them is when I do low oxygen brews, which I'm doing more of, at least with my lagers now.  Then I like to gently run the wort onto the yeast in the fermenter and only then oxygenate.   But that's quibbling beyond the scope of this topic.)

I used one of those venture aerator for a few years.  There was nothing difference when I stopped using it.  I think it's one of those things that people think should make a difference but have never really tested.
I’ve never used one myself actually. I remember Leos used a Venturi for in-line aeration when he started his brewery. The idea has always stuck with me since then.


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Thank you for mentioning me.

I still do use Venturi tube. Issue is that you need to have adequate flow to create the vacuum (to suck the air into the liquid stream).

I am not sure if there are so small Venturi tubes that would be adequate for home brewing.

Nowadays I use 1” tube( that would be a NPT Thread size). I can ferment 9 % beer without a problem. My transfer takes about 60 minutes and last time I bought new yeast pitch was 2.5 years ago. This puts me to 63-th repitching (some people call it generation).

As Denny mentioned if you use dry yeast, you do not have to worry about wort airration.
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Offline KCguy

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #23 on: July 03, 2019, 02:32:39 PM »
I think pitching healthy active yeast is key. If your not pitching active yeast, I’m sure the DO number is falling before the yeast gets going.

Would most here agree that using Imperial yeast is active yeast already?  Or are you saying starters only? 
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Offline coolman26

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #24 on: July 03, 2019, 06:50:12 PM »
I think pitching healthy active yeast is key. If your not pitching active yeast, I’m sure the DO number is falling before the yeast gets going.

Would most here agree that using Imperial yeast is active yeast already?  Or are you saying starters only?
I'm saying pitching a starter that is at high krausen. 
Jeff B

Online AzBruin

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #25 on: July 13, 2019, 05:45:25 PM »
I use 2 different methods, depending on OG. On lower gravity beers, I pour back and forth between 2 buckets, but through a fine screen colander. This has the advantage of removing some of the hops and hot break.
For anything with higher grav, (about 1.060 or so) I use a stone and bernzomatic oxy tank. To clean the stone after use, keep the oxy flowing while dipping it into some sanitizer.

I guess to be totally honest, I use the stone and tank almost all the time because I rarely brew anything less than 1.080.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2019, 05:55:26 PM by AzBruin »

Offline smkranz

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2019, 12:49:54 AM »
Fermentis conducted a yeast class a couple months ago at my local HBS.  It was an extensive presentation on their research, and dispelled some of the things I've come to supposedly know over the years about brewing and yeast.  One of them is, there's no reason to rehydrate with their dry yeasts.  That issue has been beaten to death here.  Secondly, Fermentis says there is no reason to oxygenate wort with their yeasts, because their dried yeast has the nutrients that it needs.  I don't have a copy of the presentation, but from their web site:

Effect of oxygen
WHEN USING ADY THERE IS NO SPECIFIC REQUIREMENT OF AIR OR OXYGEN DURING THE WORT COOLING AND TRANSFER TO THE FERMENTER. Indeed, the ADY is rich enough in sterols (lipids) and minerals for its own multiplication process.

To put this to the test, we brewed a second batch of the Tank 7 clone recipe from the AHA database. We direct pitched dry Belle Saison yeast (not even a Fermentis yeast, but Lallemand says the exact same thing about their yeast...no oxygenation necessary), with no oxygenation. Our OG was 1.076.  FG was 1.003.  Flavor is great.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2019, 12:53:22 AM by smkranz »
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Online Robert

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #27 on: July 17, 2019, 01:18:41 AM »

Fermentis conducted a yeast class a couple months ago at my local HBS.  It was an extensive presentation on their research, and dispelled some of the things I've come to supposedly know over the years about brewing and yeast.  One of them is, there's no reason to rehydrate with their dry yeasts.  That issue has been beaten to death here.  Secondly, Fermentis says there is no reason to oxygenate wort with their yeasts, because their dried yeast has the nutrients that it needs.  I don't have a copy of the presentation, but from their web site:

Effect of oxygen
WHEN USING ADY THERE IS NO SPECIFIC REQUIREMENT OF AIR OR OXYGEN DURING THE WORT COOLING AND TRANSFER TO THE FERMENTER. Indeed, the ADY is rich enough in sterols (lipids) and minerals for its own multiplication process.

To put this to the test, we brewed a second batch of the Tank 7 clone recipe from the AHA database. We direct pitched dry Belle Saison yeast (not even a Fermentis yeast, but Lallemand says the exact same thing about their yeast...no oxygenation necessary), with no oxygenation. Our OG was 1.076.  FG was 1.003.  Flavor is great.

A while back I had an exchange with one of their technical reps on a tangentially related topic.  He sent a couple of papers from the studies they did.  The data are rock solid.  It is in fact preferable to direct pitch without rehydration and skip oxygenation on the first pitch.  For repitching harvested yeast, proceed exactly as you would if the original pitch was liquid.  Dry yeast is no less suitable for repitching than liquid, the data show.  What is not well publicized is that, AFAICT, there is actually NO DIFFERENCE between Fermentis' and other manufacturers' yeasts.  These studies were all done in the 90s, a couple of decades before Fermentis started implying in their advertising that some kind of "new" process made this possible.  It doesn't look like there's a new type of yeast, just the belated dissemination of information dispelling old misconceptions.  Don't overcomplicate your brew day, that defeats the advantage of dry yeast, whoever sells it.  (Full disclosure, I'm a liquid yeast guy.  Never quite resolved that other issue, but it's probably irrelevant to most.)

EDIT typo
« Last Edit: July 17, 2019, 01:37:50 AM by Robert »
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Offline denny

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #28 on: July 17, 2019, 02:29:00 PM »
I'll add that it's not just Fermentis.....that applies to all dry yeast.  Lallemand says the same thing.
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Offline BrewnWKopperKat

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Re: aeration ideas
« Reply #29 on: July 18, 2019, 01:00:06 AM »
Current links to some of the dry yeast providers:

Nostalgic?  I came across a copy of the US-56 product information sheet in the "internet archives" a couple of months ago.