Author Topic: Yeast for a porter  (Read 2517 times)

Offline denny

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2019, 06:11:33 PM »
Personally I would go with WLP001 since I use the dry version, US-05 at 68F and I've had great results.  This year my Porter took gold at NHC.

I'm interested in try 1450 though.  Sounds like it would work great.

Be aware that 001, 1056, and 001 produce different results.
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Offline Robert

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #16 on: August 01, 2019, 07:49:10 PM »
Personally I would go with WLP001 since I use the dry version, US-05 at 68F and I've had great results.  This year my Porter took gold at NHC.

I'm interested in try 1450 though.  Sounds like it would work great.

Be aware that 001, 1056, and 001 produce different results.

Yeah, there's been a lot of discussion around here about all the genetic information that's come out in the last couple of years.  Those are 3 different yeasts.  Beware of the supposed "equivalents" popularly circulated, virtually none is even close to correct.  Much more important is knowing how each individual yeast performs, since assuming that one will give similar results to another based on supposed relationships is unlikely to succeed.
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Offline denny

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2019, 08:41:57 PM »
Personally I would go with WLP001 since I use the dry version, US-05 at 68F and I've had great results.  This year my Porter took gold at NHC.

I'm interested in try 1450 though.  Sounds like it would work great.

Be aware that 001, 1056, and 001 produce different results.

Yeah, there's been a lot of discussion around here about all the genetic information that's come out in the last couple of years.  Those are 3 different yeasts.  Beware of the supposed "equivalents" popularly circulated, virtually none is even close to correct.  Much more important is knowing how each individual yeast performs, since assuming that one will give similar results to another based on supposed relationships is unlikely to succeed.

Genetics aside, they produce different results. 
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline rburrelli

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2019, 09:53:42 PM »
Personally I would go with WLP001 since I use the dry version, US-05 at 68F and I've had great results.  This year my Porter took gold at NHC.

I'm interested in try 1450 though.  Sounds like it would work great.

I can report great results with 1450.  Denny’s VIP was a tremendous hit with me and many friends. Fruit esters were great.  Stone fruits came through really well.

I still have a half dozen bottles about a year old at this point.  I am seeing how they age.
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Offline blatz

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #19 on: August 05, 2019, 02:42:44 PM »
1450 is a great versatile yeast overall, but really shines in ambers, browns and porters IMHO
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Offline KellerBrauer

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #20 on: August 06, 2019, 12:03:29 PM »
Assuming this is an English style porter, I'd use WLP002.

+1

This is my all time favorite porter yeast!
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Offline goose

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #21 on: August 06, 2019, 01:04:25 PM »
Assuming this is an English style porter, I'd use WLP002.

+1

This is my all time favorite porter yeast!

I use WLP002 in my ESB.  It is a great yeast for that style.
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Offline coolman26

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #22 on: August 06, 2019, 09:03:47 PM »
Anything with color gets 1450 here.
I usually brew brown, porter, then RIS with it. It gets better with every generation for me. I try to always have it in hand.


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Offline KellerBrauer

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #23 on: August 07, 2019, 11:07:56 AM »
Assuming this is an English style porter, I'd use WLP002.

+1

This is my all time favorite porter yeast!



I use WLP002 in my ESB.  It is a great yeast for that style.

+1 Again!

I also used this yeast in my ESB earlier this year.  It performed wonderfully!!
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Offline Megary

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #24 on: September 08, 2019, 03:04:30 PM »
For housekeeping purposes, because these type of threads are so much more helpful when the OP actually follows up and lets interested parties know how they made out.   :)

I ended up using 1450 in the porter mainly because I had great results with it in my previous beer, an IPA.  The IPA came out really tasty and very much "to style"...hop forward, clean and relatively dry.  No mistaking this beer for anything other than an IPA.  (That may not sound like much to those who have made hundreds of beers, but for a new brewer making a style that honestly tastes no different (and often better) than what I get on tap at a brew pub...well that's something for sure!)

I got good attenuation with the IPA which is always a bonus, but it was the "clean" part that sold me on 1450. 

The porter fermented at 68 for 2 weeks and then packaged.  It's only been conditioning for 1 week, but I couldn't help myself and popped one open yesterday.  Again, the taste is all porter...roast, a bit of chocolate, all about the malt.  Very complex and honestly, very good (even if it has not quite finished carbing). No fruit, no nothing from the yeast other than 75% attenuation. 

Really liking 1450.

Offline denny

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #25 on: September 08, 2019, 03:40:28 PM »
For housekeeping purposes, because these type of threads are so much more helpful when the OP actually follows up and lets interested parties know how they made out.   :)

I ended up using 1450 in the porter mainly because I had great results with it in my previous beer, an IPA.  The IPA came out really tasty and very much "to style"...hop forward, clean and relatively dry.  No mistaking this beer for anything other than an IPA.  (That may not sound like much to those who have made hundreds of beers, but for a new brewer making a style that honestly tastes no different (and often better) than what I get on tap at a brew pub...well that's something for sure!)

I got good attenuation with the IPA which is always a bonus, but it was the "clean" part that sold me on 1450. 

The porter fermented at 68 for 2 weeks and then packaged.  It's only been conditioning for 1 week, but I couldn't help myself and popped one open yesterday.  Again, the taste is all porter...roast, a bit of chocolate, all about the malt.  Very complex and honestly, very good (even if it has not quite finished carbing). No fruit, no nothing from the yeast other than 75% attenuation. 

Really liking 1450.

Glad you're enjoying it! 
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline skyler

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #26 on: September 09, 2019, 02:48:21 AM »
68F fermentation temperature or will the fermenter be sitting in a 68F room? If it's the latter, the true fermentation temperature will probably be 72-76F, which is too warm for any of those yeasts, IME, but WLP001 would be my choice at that temperature.

Offline Megary

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #27 on: September 09, 2019, 12:50:01 PM »
68F fermentation temperature or will the fermenter be sitting in a 68F room? If it's the latter, the true fermentation temperature will probably be 72-76F, which is too warm for any of those yeasts, IME, but WLP001 would be my choice at that temperature.

68F room temp.  Sure, the yeast will work up a good lather and raise the actual temperature some measurable amount.  But how much in a 2.5 gal batch? And to what end??  I chose 1450 based on previous good results (at the same temperature) and early returns on the porter say that it has been a success again.  Clean, which is what I was hoping for.

FWIW, I currently have WLP001 hard at work on a Gooseberry Wheat/Fruit Beer (66-67F, same room that is starting to cool down) and it managed to keep the airlock active for a full week, which is 2-3 days longer than I'm used to seeing.  I realize the airlock is not a reliable guide to the success or failure of fermentation and certainly not all worts are the same, but I found that interesting nonetheless.

Offline skyler

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #28 on: November 08, 2019, 05:07:31 AM »
Sure, the yeast will work up a good lather and raise the actual temperature some measurable amount.  But how much in a 2.5 gal batch? And to what end??

My experience is ales increase 4-8 degrees during fermentation. 6 degrees 90% of the time. To what end? For my taste buds a 74º F-fermented American ale just tastes like homebrew, not like professional beer. Fruity and spicy in a bad way, is how I put it. Add "extract tang" and a ton of suspended sediment in the glass and you have 95% of the beer i brewed my first year. It's... not my preference. If you like it, more power to you.

Offline Megary

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Re: Yeast for a porter
« Reply #29 on: November 08, 2019, 05:25:48 PM »
Sure, the yeast will work up a good lather and raise the actual temperature some measurable amount.  But how much in a 2.5 gal batch? And to what end??

My experience is ales increase 4-8 degrees during fermentation. 6 degrees 90% of the time. To what end? For my taste buds a 74º F-fermented American ale just tastes like homebrew, not like professional beer. Fruity and spicy in a bad way, is how I put it. Add "extract tang" and a ton of suspended sediment in the glass and you have 95% of the beer i brewed my first year. It's... not my preference. If you like it, more power to you.

I get you.  But for what its worth, the Porter I made with 1450 and fermented at 68° room temperature had no signs of fruity/home brew anything.  Nothing off-flavor about it at all.  Maybe it was masked by the roasty grains, maybe 1450 isn't as susceptible to throwing that off flavor at that temp, maybe a whole pack of 1450 in a 2.5 gallon batch doesn't stress the little buggers all that much.  Whatever the reason, the Porter came out great (I did like it!) and since it didn't last long, I plan on brewing another soon.