Author Topic: Wee heavy dry yeast?  (Read 1039 times)

Offline denny

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Re: Wee heavy dry yeast?
« Reply #15 on: October 06, 2019, 03:11:00 PM »
Personally, I don't care what they did beyond curiosity.  I care about what makes the beer I want to drink.

That's absolutely fine - just don't use the phrase "wee heavy" when talking about it.

Communication breaks down if we use the same phrase to describe different things.

If people can call that hazy stuff IPA,  then I can call it wee heavy
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Offline AzBruin

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Re: Wee heavy dry yeast?
« Reply #16 on: October 06, 2019, 04:02:53 PM »
I'm with Denny. I start with a basic wee heavy recipe (or in some cases a "way heavy"), but I feel free to make changes to my taste.
Isn't that WHY we brew our own?

Offline denny

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Re: Wee heavy dry yeast?
« Reply #17 on: October 06, 2019, 04:08:14 PM »
I'm with Denny. I start with a basic wee heavy recipe (or in some cases a "way heavy"), but I feel free to make changes to my taste.
Isn't that WHY we brew our own?

Indeed.  And I understand the point....its the same thing I say about hazy OPS or Session IPA.  But opinion seems to have outvoted all of us.
« Last Edit: October 06, 2019, 04:10:19 PM by denny »
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline Northern_Brewer

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Re: Wee heavy dry yeast?
« Reply #18 on: October 06, 2019, 09:45:56 PM »
Personally, I don't care what they did beyond curiosity.  I care about what makes the beer I want to drink.

That's absolutely fine - just don't use the phrase "wee heavy" when talking about it.

Communication breaks down if we use the same phrase to describe different things.

If people can call that hazy stuff IPA,  then I can call it wee heavy

IPA is a perfect example of how using a phrase for everything leads to it meaning nothing at all.

It's not helpful for communication if some people think an IPA should look something like Greene King and others think it's Green Flash (let alone Treehouse Green).

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Wee heavy dry yeast?
« Reply #19 on: October 07, 2019, 01:52:13 AM »
I never found a answer for the question, why at low temp?

Because it's cold in Scotland and brewers there historically fermented at ambient temperatures, which meant typically pitching at 60F, sometimes lower.

Wee Heavy is one of those non-styles like ESB that really refers to a single beer, Fowler's 12 Guinea - Ron Pattinson has a good history here, in the 19th century it was 12%, with an OG of 1.159 and an FG of 1.068!! Apparent attenuation was never more than 75%, around 70% was more typical.

I didn’t know that. I thought Wee Heavy was a 120/- .  Interesting. Thanks for the information.


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Offline Robert

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Re: Wee heavy dry yeast?
« Reply #20 on: October 07, 2019, 02:40:22 AM »
I never found a answer for the question, why at low temp?

Because it's cold in Scotland and brewers there historically fermented at ambient temperatures, which meant typically pitching at 60F, sometimes lower.

Wee Heavy is one of those non-styles like ESB that really refers to a single beer, Fowler's 12 Guinea - Ron Pattinson has a good history here, in the 19th century it was 12%, with an OG of 1.159 and an FG of 1.068!! Apparent attenuation was never more than 75%, around 70% was more typical.

I didn’t know that. I thought Wee Heavy was a 120/- .  Interesting. Thanks for the information.


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Dig into Ron.  You'll find that there's really no such thing as any "shilling" whatever, many different systems used by different brewers at different times in different contexts.  Another case of the current Style Police inventing categories for their own purposes that are detached from reality.
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Offline Northern_Brewer

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Re: Wee heavy dry yeast?
« Reply #21 on: October 07, 2019, 11:41:23 AM »
Wee Heavy is one of those non-styles like ESB that really refers to a single beer, Fowler's 12 Guinea - Ron Pattinson has a good history here, in the 19th century it was 12%, with an OG of 1.159 and an FG of 1.068!! Apparent attenuation was never more than 75%, around 70% was more typical.

I didn’t know that. I thought Wee Heavy was a 120/- .

Translated literally, 12 guineas converts to 252/-  !!!!

Offline Silver_Is_Money

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Re: Wee heavy dry yeast?
« Reply #22 on: October 07, 2019, 01:56:47 PM »
I haven't tried this, but Fermentis K-97 and/or Lallemand Köln should make for a nice Scotch Ale if it held at 9% ABV.