Author Topic: Bread  (Read 3396 times)

Offline HopDen

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Re: Bread
« Reply #45 on: November 11, 2020, 07:26:01 pm »
I tried the pre-ferment this weekend.  It noticeably changes the character of the bread.



Yeah, since I started doing it I hardly ever do anything else.


i don't want to sound stoopid here but, what is pre-ferment? I have been making dough for over 30 years and I've never heard that word used.

Offline pete b

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Re: Bread
« Reply #46 on: November 11, 2020, 07:49:36 pm »
I tried the pre-ferment this weekend.  It noticeably changes the character of the bread.



Yeah, since I started doing it I hardly ever do anything else.



i don't want to sound stoopid here but, what is pre-ferment? I have been making dough for over 30 years and I've never heard that word used.
It means either making the entire dough or a portion of it a day ahead (or more) and retarding the fermentation by refrigerating, generally overnight. This method tends to lead to more of a fermentation character, even if sourdough isn't used. I think it gives a chance for lacto and other bacteria to reproduce. Even though you are not familiar with this term you may be familiar with a poolish (or sponge, a wet pre-ferment) or pate fermente, which is a pre ferment which is pretty much a finished dough, but it is brought up to room temperature and kneaded into a complete dough. In either case commercial yeast is added to both the pre ferment and the final dough.
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Offline HopDen

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Re: Bread
« Reply #47 on: November 11, 2020, 09:41:10 pm »
I tried the pre-ferment this weekend.  It noticeably changes the character of the bread.



Yeah, since I started doing it I hardly ever do anything else.



i don't want to sound stoopid here but, what is pre-ferment? I have been making dough for over 30 years and I've never heard that word used.
It means either making the entire dough or a portion of it a day ahead (or more) and retarding the fermentation by refrigerating, generally overnight. This method tends to lead to more of a fermentation character, even if sourdough isn't used. I think it gives a chance for lacto and other bacteria to reproduce. Even though you are not familiar with this term you may be familiar with a poolish (or sponge, a wet pre-ferment) or pate fermente, which is a pre ferment which is pretty much a finished dough, but it is brought up to room temperature and kneaded into a complete dough. In either case commercial yeast is added to both the pre ferment and the final dough.

Ok, thanks. Basically a procedural action.
When not rushed for a dough, I will do, for the most part the same thing. I make dough, let it start to ferment (commercial dry yeast) at room temp for a few hours then place in the refrigerator for 3-4 days. Although I have played with the wet ferment for 1-2 days I usually complete the dough then cold ferment.

I really dig fermentation!!

Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: Bread
« Reply #48 on: December 31, 2020, 03:37:12 pm »
The process is also known as "bulk fermentation."  Bulk fermentation helps to prevent over and underproofing.  However, retarding the fermentation is critical to obtaining good flavor and good oven spring with sourdough.  I usually bulk ferment sourdough for 3 hours at room temperature before placing it in the refrigerator where is stays for 24 hours for pizza dough and 48 hours for bread boules.  Obtaining good oven spring with sourdough is almost an art form.  Here is one of my early successes:

« Last Edit: December 31, 2020, 04:36:56 pm by Saccharomyces »

Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: Bread
« Reply #49 on: December 31, 2020, 03:44:54 pm »
By the way, retarded bulk fermentation is critical with sourdough because the yeast species are in a symbiotic relationship with the bacteria species. Bacteria reduce starches to sugars for the yeast to consume, as basic sourdough consists of bread flour, water, salt, and sourdough starter.

Offline EnkAMania

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Re: Bread
« Reply #50 on: January 01, 2021, 11:27:11 pm »
Doing my first attempt at making fancy pizza dough.  Day 1 made biga, day 2 make dough.  Tomorrow I make the pizza with homemade sauce and mozzarella.


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Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: Bread
« Reply #51 on: January 16, 2021, 10:00:46 pm »
I make sourdough pizza dough almost every week.  Pizza dough is much easier to make than a sourdough boule.

Offline narcout

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Re: Bread
« Reply #52 on: January 24, 2021, 10:29:01 pm »
i don't want to sound stoopid here but, what is pre-ferment? I have been making dough for over 30 years and I've never heard that word used.

In this case, I was referring to a poolish where you take 1/2 of the total flour for the recipe, mix it with an equal weight of water, add a very small dose of yeast, and let it sit for about 12 hours before mixing it into the remainder of the ingredients.

Flour, water , salt , yeast book, overnight white bread recipe

That is the book I have as well; I think it's fantastic.

This was my latest:

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Offline HopDen

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Re: Bread
« Reply #53 on: January 24, 2021, 11:09:11 pm »
i don't want to sound stoopid here but, what is pre-ferment? I have been making dough for over 30 years and I've never heard that word used.

In this case, I was referring to a poolish where you take 1/2 of the total flour for the recipe, mix it with an equal weight of water, add a very small dose of yeast, and let it sit for about 12 hours before mixing it into the remainder of the ingredients.

Flour, water , salt , yeast book, overnight white bread recipe

That is the book I have as well; I think it's fantastic.

This was my latest:




So after reading up on a pre-ferment, I started making a poolish but letting mine work for 18 hours in my wine cooler set at 55* before completing recipe. After completing dough recipe I will let that ferment for an additional 3 days while incorporating a stretch and fold technique. This has improved my pizza dough and I like the results.

That bread looks delicious too!!

Offline pete b

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Re: Bread
« Reply #54 on: March 14, 2021, 09:27:09 pm »
Pain de campagne.

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