Author Topic: Diastatic yeast as a purposeful secondary fermenter  (Read 369 times)

Offline denny

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Re: Diastatic yeast as a purposeful secondary fermenter
« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2019, 07:29:09 PM »
I am not certain if it has been genotyped for equivalence, but WLP 590 is a French Saison (POF+ with diastaticus), I believe.

Thanks!  I was mainly confused by the number.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Diastatic yeast as a purposeful secondary fermenter
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2019, 08:00:58 PM »

A few random comments....

That's way too high an OG for a tripel.  The ABV of a tripel depends on a lw FG not a high OG

You have no sugar in there.  Not only is it pretty much standard for a tripel, bit not using it 2 I'll seriously limit the attenuation you can get.

With that grist, no matter what yeast you use, you likely won't get the kind of attenuation you're looking for.  Keep in mind that the attenuation rating of a yeast is simply a way of comparing it to another yeast, not an indication of the attenuation you'll necessarily get.

My advice is to let this one ride, take what you get, and reformulate the recipe for next time.

Yea, haha [airquotes] "tripel" [/airquotes]. 

Thanks for the advice!  I didn't know that about attenuation.  I thought it was just the percentage of the wort sugars the yeast consumes on average. 

I'm going to go with hopfenundmalz's suggestion of WLP3711.  I will desperately try to remember to update this to let you know how it rides!

Isn't 3711 Wyeast?  Does White have one, too?
It's the French Saison yeast

Yeah, I know.  But does White call it 3711 also?  Since I don't use White, I honestly don't know

Wyeast 3711 is what I meant. Belle Saison (dry) is said to be very close. I don't know what Dave Taylor has equivalent on his spreadsheet.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Diastatic yeast as a purposeful secondary fermenter
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2019, 08:15:03 PM »
I looked at the yeast family tree. WLP545 was shown as close to Belle Saison, which has been said to be close to WY-3711.
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Offline denny

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Re: Diastatic yeast as a purposeful secondary fermenter
« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2019, 08:20:09 PM »

A few random comments....

That's way too high an OG for a tripel.  The ABV of a tripel depends on a lw FG not a high OG

You have no sugar in there.  Not only is it pretty much standard for a tripel, bit not using it 2 I'll seriously limit the attenuation you can get.

With that grist, no matter what yeast you use, you likely won't get the kind of attenuation you're looking for.  Keep in mind that the attenuation rating of a yeast is simply a way of comparing it to another yeast, not an indication of the attenuation you'll necessarily get.

My advice is to let this one ride, take what you get, and reformulate the recipe for next time.

Yea, haha [airquotes] "tripel" [/airquotes]. 

Thanks for the advice!  I didn't know that about attenuation.  I thought it was just the percentage of the wort sugars the yeast consumes on average. 

I'm going to go with hopfenundmalz's suggestion of WLP3711.  I will desperately try to remember to update this to let you know how it rides!

Isn't 3711 Wyeast?  Does White have one, too?
It's the French Saison yeast

Yeah, I know.  But does White call it 3711 also?  Since I don't use White, I honestly don't know

Wyeast 3711 is what I meant. Belle Saison (dry) is said to be very close. I don't know what Dave Taylor has equivalent on his spreadsheet.

Hey, you know how easily confused I am!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Diastatic yeast as a purposeful secondary fermenter
« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2019, 09:40:25 PM »

A few random comments....

That's way too high an OG for a tripel.  The ABV of a tripel depends on a lw FG not a high OG

You have no sugar in there.  Not only is it pretty much standard for a tripel, bit not using it 2 I'll seriously limit the attenuation you can get.

With that grist, no matter what yeast you use, you likely won't get the kind of attenuation you're looking for.  Keep in mind that the attenuation rating of a yeast is simply a way of comparing it to another yeast, not an indication of the attenuation you'll necessarily get.

My advice is to let this one ride, take what you get, and reformulate the recipe for next time.

Yea, haha [airquotes] "tripel" [/airquotes]. 

Thanks for the advice!  I didn't know that about attenuation.  I thought it was just the percentage of the wort sugars the yeast consumes on average. 

I'm going to go with hopfenundmalz's suggestion of WLP3711.  I will desperately try to remember to update this to let you know how it rides!

Isn't 3711 Wyeast?  Does White have one, too?
It's the French Saison yeast

Yeah, I know.  But does White call it 3711 also?  Since I don't use White, I honestly don't know

Wyeast 3711 is what I meant. Belle Saison (dry) is said to be very close. I don't know what Dave Taylor has equivalent on his spreadsheet.

Hey, you know how easily confused I am!

I've noticed Wyeast has a 4 digit code, White Labs has a 3 digit code.
Jeff Rankert
AHA Governing Committee
AHA Lifetime Member
BJCP National
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline denny

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Re: Diastatic yeast as a purposeful secondary fermenter
« Reply #20 on: December 04, 2019, 09:58:20 PM »
I've noticed Wyeast has a 4 digit code, White Labs has a 3 digit code.

That I was aware of, which threw me.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline BBTNT

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Re: Diastatic yeast as a purposeful secondary fermenter
« Reply #21 on: December 09, 2019, 04:51:11 PM »
Found an Omega strain called "Saisonstein's Monster" that I decided to go with.  It's basically a mash up of a Belgian ale & diastatic French saison.  It hits in the 90% attenuation I was looking for without having to juggle the two previously discussed diastatic & regular strains.  I'll let you know how it goes!