Author Topic: SNS method and yeast pack age  (Read 1602 times)

Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: SNS method and yeast pack age
« Reply #45 on: August 02, 2020, 02:22:55 PM »
I tried the SNS method a couple of times, but was not sure that I was pitching at the proper time, and I didn't see any improvement that seemed worthwhile to me. I was using a 1 gallon plastic milk jug rather than a glass container. Is that OK or is there some reason it is not recommended?

Glass is always better when dealing with cultures because it is easier to sanitize.  I do not know where you are located, but most better homebrewing suppliers carry 1-gallon glass jugs.  One-gallon glass jugs filled with apple juice can often be found in grocery stores after the apple harvest; however, glass has been replaced plastic in a lot of places.  If you are willing to pony up the dough, my preferred SNS container is a 5L borosilicate glass media.  However, this size media bottle is not cheap, even used.  Here is a photo of my old Corning 1395-5L 5-liter media bottle (I gifted it to a talented young brewer I know when I stopped brewing four years ago):




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I generally start brewing around 8 or 9 in the morning and pitch my yeast around 2 or 3 PM. I made the SNS starter first thing in the morning, but that was only 6-8 hours before pitching. To pitch at 12 hours would require me to wake up in the middle of the night to make the starter or delay pitching for hours after I have finished brewing. Neither of those options is convenient for me. If I make a starter ahead of time and refrigerate it then it is one less thing I have to do on brew day and I know it will be ready when I want to pitch it.

You can start a culture the previous day or evening, let it grow for 5 to 7 hours, and then retard activity by placing it in the refrigerater (the culture will still be active, but it will be working at a reduced metabolic rate).  The culture should be removed from the refrigerator in the morning as soon as you get up. Placing a starter in one’s refrigerator to retard growth is not remotely the same thing as allowing it to ferment out before storing it in a refrigerator. The cells that are in a fermented-out starter are in a state called quiescence.  Yeast cells that are in quiescence have undergone morphological changes where the cell wall thickens in order to prepare for a lack of carbon to transform into energy. These changes have to be undone when a culture is pitched, lengthening lag time.

With that said, 12 hours is not a hard and fast number. However, the starter should be pitched within 18 hours of inoculation for best results, which means that if your brew day ends at 3, you should inoculate your starter no earlier than 9pm (experience with a strain will teach one how early is too early).  Retarding a culture will buy one more time, but it takes experience to know when a retarded culture will reach high krausen after being removed from one's refrigerator.  In the spirit of keeping things simple, one just needs to be mindful of pitching a starter within 18 hours of inoculation.  Also, remember that there are cultures like BRY 97 that take a little longer to reach high krausen because there is nothing average with respect to how long that strain takes to reach high krausen.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2020, 04:11:01 AM by Saccharomyces »

Offline EnkAMania

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Re: SNS method and yeast pack age
« Reply #46 on: August 02, 2020, 07:23:18 PM »
Yesterday I did my regular vitality starter (pitching 4-5 hours) with shaken not stirred method.  The shaking is a bit of pain, but I treated it like exercise and walked around the house walking and shaking.  After 24 hours, my 1.070 wort is down do 1.032.  This is a yeast slurry of Conan from 5-29, fourth beer for this yeast.  You might have a convert here.
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Online Richard

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Re: SNS method and yeast pack age
« Reply #47 on: August 02, 2020, 08:39:22 PM »
Great suggestion on cooling down the starter to slow the growth. That should work for me. I am sure I can find a glass jug somewhere, even in these days where plastic is taking over. Does cheap wine still come in glass jugs with handles? I could buy some and use it for cooking. Actually, after thinking a bit more, I will stick with gallon plastic jugs. I don't have any problems sanitizing those and they are plentiful and essentially free.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2020, 01:06:10 AM by Richard »
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Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: SNS method and yeast pack age
« Reply #48 on: August 03, 2020, 04:23:49 AM »
I am sure I can find a glass jug somewhere, even in these days where plastic is taking over. Does cheap wine still come in glass jugs with handles? I could buy some and use it for cooking. Actually, after thinking a bit more, I will stick with gallon plastic jugs. I don't have any problems sanitizing those and they are plentiful and essentially free.

If you look long enough, you can probably find a 1-gallon jug for free.  I personally would never propagate starters in plastic.  Most infections are pitched with the starter and plastic is more difficult to sanitize than glass because it is porous. My local homebrew supply store sells 1-gallon glass jugs for $6.00. That is cheap insurance.

Offline millstone

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Re: SNS method and yeast pack age
« Reply #49 on: August 03, 2020, 11:28:23 AM »
I am sure I can find a glass jug somewhere,

I have been using the SNS method for a few years and use a one gallon pickle jar that has a nice wide mouth. I need to make sure I have a good seal on the lid so that during the shaking, wort does not come out through the lid.

Offline goose

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Re: SNS method and yeast pack age
« Reply #50 on: August 03, 2020, 02:57:04 PM »
How about using a growler from a brewery?  Some breweries still sell growlers made of clear glass (not a really great idea when transporting them without taking steps to keep sunlight from skunking the beer).  I have several here that I use for blow-off containers for my conicals.  I am sure you can find one somewhere, plus you can get some beer as well and "keep the glass".

Just remember not to boil anything in them and then immdeiately put them in cold water.  You will shatter the glass and end up with a mess.
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: SNS method and yeast pack age
« Reply #51 on: August 04, 2020, 01:06:49 AM »
I seem to recall that the starter vessel needs to be at least 4 times the volume of starter medium.  But I could’ve misremembered....
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Offline denny

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Re: SNS method and yeast pack age
« Reply #52 on: August 04, 2020, 02:04:26 PM »
I seem to recall that the starter vessel needs to be at least 4 times the volume of starter medium.  But I could’ve misremembered....

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Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: SNS method and yeast pack age
« Reply #53 on: August 04, 2020, 10:31:18 PM »
I seem to recall that the starter vessel needs to be at least 4 times the volume of starter medium.  But I could’ve misremembered....

It needs to be at least four times the volume of the starter.  I use a 5L media bottle to make 1L starters.