General Category > Yeast and Fermentation

Progressively Adding Yeast to a Big Beer

(1/3) > >>

dhacker:
Getting ready to brew a Wee Heavy and a Barleywine. In the past I've made big starters and added it all at once to the primary after a healthy dose of O2. Does anyone progressively add new, healthy yeast in primary to your biggest brews rather than pitching all at once? Is there any benefit/ detriment? I've added nutrient along the way, but never new yeast.

blatz:

--- Quote from: dhacker on November 16, 2009, 12:26:33 PM ---Getting ready to brew a Wee Heavy and a Barleywine. In the past I've made big starters and added it all at once to the primary after a healthy dose of O2. Does anyone progressively add new, healthy yeast in primary to your biggest brews rather than pitching all at once? Is there any benefit/ detriment? I've added nutrient along the way, but never new yeast.

--- End quote ---

don't know why one would do this - once fermentation begins (with the initial pitch) all the oxygen in the environment is processed.  The yeast being pitched after the initial pitch wouldn't have what they need to grow and do their job. 

The only way I can think this would work would be to pitch starters at high krausen, but why would you want to put starter beer in your main beer? 

do you really have that much of a problem fermenting big beers?  just make a smaller beer first and use the cake - works every time for me.

ndcube:
I would think incrementally adding sugars would benefit you more to cut down on the high initial OG.

If your yeast poops out and you want to use new yeast then racking onto another fresh yeast cake is the only thing that has worked for me.

bonjour:
I have, but only with monster beers, ones where the alcohol has killed the yeast and thus has remaining fermentable sugars.  What I add is an ACTIVE yeast culture in very large amounts.  Think a growler FULL from your friendly neighborhood brewpub.
If this settles you have over a quart of thick active slurry.  The idea is to pitch a full active amount of yeast and not worry about growth.  This also works extremely well for actual stuck fermentations.  This is into a 5 gallon fermentation.  

Fred

dhacker:
I was thinking not so much in terms of the aerobic reproduction phase when the yeast DO need an oxygen rich environment as I was about the anaerobic fermentation stage when they get down to the business of chomping sugars. Like Fred says, in monster beers yeast fatigue even at high pitching rates might warrant adding some new, vibrant solders as the alcohol content goes up.

just wondering!   :) 

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version