Author Topic: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?  (Read 297 times)

Offline OhDannyBoy!

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Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« on: December 13, 2019, 02:08:53 PM »
So, it's my first time using slurry...

Mr Malty's Repitching from Slurry Calculator (default settings) said for a 10 litre batch @ 1.054 OG I required 76ml @ 60% Viability (been in the fermenter for 4 weeks at time of harvesting, so estimated harvest date at 3 weeks ago).

Now I'm concerned about Lag Time, so far it's been 18 hours with little sign of air lock (bubbles) activity. It's in a white plastic bucket so I can't really see what's going on inside?

Any feedback, suggestions or calming words folks?

Cheers! Dan :o

« Last Edit: December 13, 2019, 03:03:25 PM by OhDannyBoy! »

Online denny

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2019, 03:09:19 PM »
18 hours is a moment in terms of lag time.  Relax.
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Offline Bob357

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2019, 03:32:00 PM »
Airlock activity is a poor indicator of fermentation, especially when using a bucket. Bucket lids are notorious for not sealing well. Also, as Denny stated, 18 hours lag time isn't a problem. Give it another day and then try shining a strong flashlight or lamp from the back side of the bucket and look for a shadowy area above the liquid level.
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Offline Kevin

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2019, 04:47:46 PM »
Keep in mind too that lag time is more a problem in the minds of homebrewers than to the yeast. What we call "lag" is actually part of the normal yeast life cycle. Think of it as a distance runner eating pasta before before a big race. They are loading up in preparation for a big energy expenditure.
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Online Slowbrew

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2019, 06:00:20 PM »
An example that might help.  I kegged a English Golden Ale on Tuesday that had taken 4 days to get started.  I think I learned a bit about London Ale III.  Like ambient temp ~54F may be too low for my timelines but once it gets going it gets the job done.

I ended up raising the wort up into the low 60's to get it rolling but only because I need the beer for a family get together on 12/21. 

Slow is okay, give the little beasties time to do there thing.

Paul
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Offline WDE97

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2019, 06:43:54 PM »
Something else to consider.....did you just grab some slurry and pitch it, or did you create a starter with that slurry first? If you just pitched the slurry, then a longer lag time would be expected than if you created a starter and got the yeast active before pitching.
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Offline OhDannyBoy!

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2019, 05:31:04 PM »
18 hours is a moment in terms of lag time.  Relax.

Phew!... Cheers Denny ;) Yeasties are happily bubbling away now! :D

Offline OhDannyBoy!

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #7 on: December 14, 2019, 05:37:09 PM »
Airlock activity is a poor indicator of fermentation, especially when using a bucket. Bucket lids are notorious for not sealing well. Also, as Denny stated, 18 hours lag time isn't a problem. Give it another day and then try shining a strong flashlight or lamp from the back side of the bucket and look for a shadowy area above the liquid level.

Cheers Bob ;) I always make sure I have an airtight seal by applying a very small amount of pressure to the lid with my finger and seeing if the bubbler moves very slightly - very scientific I know :P First krausen is there now :D

Offline OhDannyBoy!

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #8 on: December 14, 2019, 05:38:25 PM »
Keep in mind too that lag time is more a problem in the minds of homebrewers than to the yeast. What we call "lag" is actually part of the normal yeast life cycle. Think of it as a distance runner eating pasta before before a big race. They are loading up in preparation for a big energy expenditure.

Cheers Kevin ;)

Offline OhDannyBoy!

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #9 on: December 14, 2019, 05:40:37 PM »
An example that might help.  I kegged a English Golden Ale on Tuesday that had taken 4 days to get started.  I think I learned a bit about London Ale III.  Like ambient temp ~54F may be too low for my timelines but once it gets going it gets the job done.

I ended up raising the wort up into the low 60's to get it rolling but only because I need the beer for a family get together on 12/21. 

Slow is okay, give the little beasties time to do there thing.

Paul

Cheers Paul ;)

Offline OhDannyBoy!

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #10 on: December 14, 2019, 05:46:39 PM »
Something else to consider.....did you just grab some slurry and pitch it, or did you create a starter with that slurry first? If you just pitched the slurry, then a longer lag time would be expected than if you created a starter and got the yeast active before pitching.

Cheers Robert ;) I didn't make a starter, I took it out of the fridge on brewday morning, it's was at 18c by the time I pitched. Good to hear that it isn't a problem as a lot of writing seems to say 3-15 hrs for Lag Phase. I won't worry next time 8)

Offline OhDannyBoy!

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #11 on: December 14, 2019, 05:51:28 PM »
Oh!... and I understand that different yeast strains behave differently, so just for any future reference, this was Wyeast 1098 British Ale. ;)

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #12 on: December 15, 2019, 01:09:48 PM »
Another thing about using slurry is that you can try to time your batches so you are repitching immediately from a prior fermenter upon racking out from that primary.  This ensures highly viable yeast slurry.  Yesterday I racked a batch onto a yeast cake in a fermenter that I had just racked from, only cleaning off the Krausen ring with a sanitized paper towel.  I don’t do this often, but it is a bigger lager beer that just went in as the second batch...
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Offline OhDannyBoy!

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Re: Using Yeast Slurry?... Now I'm concerned about Lag Time!?
« Reply #13 on: December 15, 2019, 02:57:33 PM »
Another thing about using slurry is that you can try to time your batches so you are repitching immediately from a prior fermenter upon racking out from that primary.  This ensures highly viable yeast slurry.  Yesterday I racked a batch onto a yeast cake in a fermenter that I had just racked from, only cleaning off the Krausen ring with a sanitized paper towel.  I don’t do this often, but it is a bigger lager beer that just went in as the second batch...
Cheers!

Cheers ;) At present I don't transfer for secondary/conditioning, just 3-4 weeks in same bucket for primary and a fair bit of secondary. I may consider changing my process when using slurry, it makes sense to pitch slurry when highly viable ;) Alternatively I may just make a vitality starter so it's raring to go! I understand that there will always be a Lag Phase though as the Yeasties have to acclimatise to there new environment and prepare to reproduce.