Author Topic: Dry vs. Liquid  (Read 2036 times)

Offline HopDen

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2020, 06:00:23 am »
Picked up 4 packets of W34/70 today. Brewing Sunday...hoping the triple decoction Czech Pils does well with the 34/70. We will ferment per their recommendations, at 55 degrees F.

I make a Cream Ale using 34/70 so its really a lager. I ferment it at 50*F until D-rest time. Try 50* on your next go around for the same recipe and compare.
Cheers

TXFlyGuy

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #16 on: February 15, 2020, 06:10:55 am »
Picked up 4 packets of W34/70 today. Brewing Sunday...hoping the triple decoction Czech Pils does well with the 34/70. We will ferment per their recommendations, at 55 degrees F.

I make a Cream Ale using 34/70 so its really a lager. I ferment it at 50*F until D-rest time. Try 50* on your next go around for the same recipe and compare.
Cheers

Thanks for the advice. I noted their website says 48 degrees will work with the proper pitching rate.

Offline mabrungard

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2020, 08:25:51 am »
A note:  Fermentis nor Lallemand no longer recommend rehydrating.

Was not aware of that, both websites have options for rehydration. What do they say about it?

When your advantage is 'ease of use', you're less likely to 'recommend' something that reduces that ease. The 'recommendation' is actually disingenuous.

While there is likely enough live yeast in the typical packet of dry yeast, it is still wise and worthwhile to properly rehydrate your yeast prior to pitching. My greatest concern with rehydration instructions is that they often recommend that the water be at a lukewarm temperature and that invites the potential that overly hot water actually kills some of your yeast. I recommend using room temperature water for that reason.
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Offline denny

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2020, 08:49:32 am »
A note:  Fermentis nor Lallemand no longer recommend rehydrating.

Was not aware of that, both websites have options for rehydration. What do they say about it?

For the last few years, in every seminar Fermentis has done including HBC, that's what they've said.  I spoke with a biologist at Lallemand a couple months ago who said he couldn't undsrsta d why they'd ever recommended rehydration. A couple other people at the company confirmed that to me.
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Offline denny

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2020, 08:51:16 am »
A note:  Fermentis nor Lallemand no longer recommend rehydrating.

Was not aware of that, both websites have options for rehydration. What do they say about it?

When your advantage is 'ease of use', you're less likely to 'recommend' something that reduces that ease. The 'recommendation' is actually disingenuous.

While there is likely enough live yeast in the typical packet of dry yeast, it is still wise and worthwhile to properly rehydrate your yeast prior to pitching. My greatest concern with rehydration instructions is that they often recommend that the water be at a lukewarm temperature and that invites the potential that overly hot water actually kills some of your yeast. I recommend using room temperature water for that reason.

Martin, I think you may see ulterior motives where there are none.  I've spoken with science people, not marketing people.  What have your experiences been with rehydrating vs. not rehydrating?
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline narvin

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2020, 02:21:20 pm »
A note:  Fermentis nor Lallemand no longer recommend rehydrating.

Was not aware of that, both websites have options for rehydration. What do they say about it?

When your advantage is 'ease of use', you're less likely to 'recommend' something that reduces that ease. The 'recommendation' is actually disingenuous.

While there is likely enough live yeast in the typical packet of dry yeast, it is still wise and worthwhile to properly rehydrate your yeast prior to pitching. My greatest concern with rehydration instructions is that they often recommend that the water be at a lukewarm temperature and that invites the potential that overly hot water actually kills some of your yeast. I recommend using room temperature water for that reason.

Martin, I think you may see ulterior motives where there are none.  I've spoken with science people, not marketing people.  What have your experiences been with rehydrating vs. not rehydrating?

I’m not a big dry yeast guy but the BRY-97 I used recently had rehydration instructions on the sachet.

Offline denny

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2020, 02:47:13 pm »
A note:  Fermentis nor Lallemand no longer recommend rehydrating.

Was not aware of that, both websites have options for rehydration. What do they say about it?

When your advantage is 'ease of use', you're less likely to 'recommend' something that reduces that ease. The 'recommendation' is actually disingenuous.

While there is likely enough live yeast in the typical packet of dry yeast, it is still wise and worthwhile to properly rehydrate your yeast prior to pitching. My greatest concern with rehydration instructions is that they often recommend that the water be at a lukewarm temperature and that invites the potential that overly hot water actually kills some of your yeast. I recommend using room temperature water for that reason.

Martin, I think you may see ulterior motives where there are none.  I've spoken with science people, not marketing people.  What have your experiences been with rehydrating vs. not rehydrating?

I’m not a big dry yeast guy but the BRY-97 I used recently had rehydration instructions on the sachet.

Only becasue they haven't updated it or the website.  The biologist I spoke with at Lallamand said it isn't necessary.
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TXFlyGuy

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #22 on: February 18, 2020, 06:27:48 pm »
Our next brew will be a German Pils, using the W-34/70 yeast.
Our current ferment is a Czech Pils, using Wyeast. Took it through 3 generations of starters, decanting each one and then feeding it with more fresh/sterile wort. The last generation was the best, with a good fragrance. The lag time after pitching was less than 8 hours at 55 degrees. Got it at 49 F now.

Offline William Wible

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #23 on: February 18, 2020, 06:35:55 pm »
I have always been a liquid yeast guy.  For beer anyway.   I started homebrewing in 1997.  Back then, the word was that dry yeast wasn’t good.  I have used dry yeast for wine (kits), and I’ve used it for mead and cider.  Because those were the recommendations.  Never for beer.  I have used both Wyeast and White Labs strains with success.  I guess I tend to use Wyeast a little more.  Mostly because the White Labs strains I want to use somehow became ‘Vault’ strains and their vault never seems to open.

Offline Lazy Ant Brewing

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #24 on: February 19, 2020, 09:35:48 am »
I use  dry yeast each time and always get good results.  I like to keep brewing as simple as possible.  The lesser number of steps with dry yeast means fewer opportunities for infections as compared to making a starter or purchasing yeast whose vitality may have been degraded during shipping. Our LHBS have only the most basic selection of liquid yeasts.

I also use a new packet each time rather than trying to save yeast.  If you ruin a batch because of contamination thats $25 or more for ingredients plus the several hours required to make wort and clean up equipment.  And you may not have time in your daily schedule because of other commitments or adverse weather (for those of us who brew outside) to brew a replacement batch to meet a deadline.
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Offline Megary

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #25 on: February 19, 2020, 10:50:42 am »
I actually like using both.  Brewing 2.5 gallons at a pop, for me using either is a breeze.  Sanitize the package, sanitize the scissors, give the yeast a little pep-talk...and in they go. 

Lots of interesting liquid yeasts for sure, and thanks to the great cross-reference work by dmtaylor et. al., I think I'll be experimenting with some more dry in the near future.

One thing for sure though, I'll always keep a pack of US-05 on hand...in case of emergency.

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #26 on: February 19, 2020, 10:55:04 am »
..., give the yeast a little pep-talk...and in they go. 

...





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Offline Visor

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #27 on: February 19, 2020, 11:05:05 am »
I use  dry yeast each time and always get good results.  I like to keep brewing as simple as possible.  The lesser number of steps with dry yeast means fewer opportunities for infections as compared to making a starter or purchasing yeast whose vitality may have been degraded during shipping. Our LHBS have only the most basic selection of liquid yeasts.

I also use a new packet each time rather than trying to save yeast.  If you ruin a batch because of contamination thats $25 or more for ingredients plus the several hours required to make wort and clean up equipment.  And you may not have time in your daily schedule because of other commitments or adverse weather (for those of us who brew outside) to brew a replacement batch to meet a deadline.

   Probably 90% of the beers I've brewed the last 3 or so years have been from harvested yeast and I haven't had a batch ruined yet by contaminated yeast [he said while touching wood]. There is always at least one jar in the fridge with some US-05, frequently some 34/70, lately BE-256 and. I usually will discard unused yeast after a couple months because that seems to be the about point where autolysis becomes increasingly likely.
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Offline William Wible

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Re: Dry vs. Liquid
« Reply #28 on: February 19, 2020, 11:53:51 am »
I do re-use yeast.  Especially as I’m brewing smaller 3 gallon batches and the cost of liquid yeast is about $8 here.  I split yeast into multiple starters.  I try to brew in a sequence that makes sense and carry forward.  I would brew a blonde ale first, then a pale ale, then use that cake from the pale ale for a barleywine.  Once I brew a higher alcohol beer like a barleywine or a RIS, I do not re-use that yeast.  I will also not carry forward from anything with a really strong flavor like a double ipa or a smoked beer.