Author Topic: 2010 Sept./Oct. - Batch Sparging  (Read 5509 times)

Offline jrskjei

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Re: 2010 Sept./Oct. - Batch Sparging
« Reply #30 on: August 27, 2010, 10:09:57 PM »
The article is great - thanks for putting that together.  It's an article that almost everybody can get something out of.  I was really happy to see it listed on the cover and even more excited to find that you had written it.
I have a question about the water temperatures listed in the "A Batch Sparge Walkthrough" section.  I usually brew with 12-15 lbs of grain in a 10 gallon cooler.  I heat the mash water to about 78-80 deg C, add it to the cooler, and let it cool to around 74 deg C before I add the grain.  This usually gets me a mash temp around 65 deg C.  I'll then fly sparge with water at about 77 deg C. I have done a batch sparge only twice, and the target temps I used were the same as when I fly sparge.  I am going to do a brew on Sunday and am going to batch sparge it.   You have listed the mash and batch sparge water at 85-88 deg C, which seems kinda high to me.  Do you need those higher temps to account for the complete draining of the tun?  Is there something I'm missing?

Offline denny

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Re: 2010 Sept./Oct. - Batch Sparging
« Reply #31 on: August 28, 2010, 08:56:20 AM »
The article is great - thanks for putting that together.  It's an article that almost everybody can get something out of.  I was really happy to see it listed on the cover and even more excited to find that you had written it.
I have a question about the water temperatures listed in the "A Batch Sparge Walkthrough" section.  I usually brew with 12-15 lbs of grain in a 10 gallon cooler.  I heat the mash water to about 78-80 deg C, add it to the cooler, and let it cool to around 74 deg C before I add the grain.  This usually gets me a mash temp around 65 deg C.  I'll then fly sparge with water at about 77 deg C. I have done a batch sparge only twice, and the target temps I used were the same as when I fly sparge.  I am going to do a brew on Sunday and am going to batch sparge it.   You have listed the mash and batch sparge water at 85-88 deg C, which seems kinda high to me.  Do you need those higher temps to account for the complete draining of the tun?  Is there something I'm missing?

Nope, you're not missing anything.  For the mash, use whatever temp you usually like to use, and account fopr the thermal mass of the cooler and grain in your normal way.  For the sparge, I like to try to get my grainbed up to about 168F if I can.  To do that, I use sparge water that's about 185-190.  I don't know if there's really an advantage to doing that, but it's my SOP.  I suppose that since you drain the tun before the sparge there may be less residual heat there than if there was still water in it.  Basically, use whatever temps work for you....my article was intended to be only a general guideline for temps.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline pertinax92

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Re: 2010 Sept./Oct. - Batch Sparging
« Reply #32 on: August 28, 2010, 04:42:19 PM »
great article!  no other comment.
~Snax~

Offline jrskjei

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Re: 2010 Sept./Oct. - Batch Sparging
« Reply #33 on: August 29, 2010, 05:09:39 AM »
The article is great - thanks for putting that together.  It's an article that almost everybody can get something out of.  I was really happy to see it listed on the cover and even more excited to find that you had written it.
I have a question about the water temperatures listed in the "A Batch Sparge Walkthrough" section.  I usually brew with 12-15 lbs of grain in a 10 gallon cooler.  I heat the mash water to about 78-80 deg C, add it to the cooler, and let it cool to around 74 deg C before I add the grain.  This usually gets me a mash temp around 65 deg C.  I'll then fly sparge with water at about 77 deg C. I have done a batch sparge only twice, and the target temps I used were the same as when I fly sparge.  I am going to do a brew on Sunday and am going to batch sparge it.   You have listed the mash and batch sparge water at 85-88 deg C, which seems kinda high to me.  Do you need those higher temps to account for the complete draining of the tun?  Is there something I'm missing?

Nope, you're not missing anything.  For the mash, use whatever temp you usually like to use, and account fopr the thermal mass of the cooler and grain in your normal way.  For the sparge, I like to try to get my grainbed up to about 168F if I can.  To do that, I use sparge water that's about 185-190.  I don't know if there's really an advantage to doing that, but it's my SOP.  I suppose that since you drain the tun before the sparge there may be less residual heat there than if there was still water in it.  Basically, use whatever temps work for you....my article was intended to be only a general guideline for temps.

Thanks for the info, and the quick response. I'm really looking forward to this batch.  I'll keep an eye out for more of your articles.

Offline halenrush

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Re: 2010 Sept./Oct. - Batch Sparging
« Reply #34 on: August 29, 2010, 10:52:42 AM »
Denny, I haven't read all the responses so I don't know if this was brought up. 

Up until yesterday, I've been using a brewing calculator for my strike and sparge water calculations.  I usually ended up with about 8 gallons of preboil wort with my method which consisted of 3-4 gallons of strike water and 5-6 gallons of sparge water, depending on recipe. I would never try and split strike and sparge water 50/50 (like your method).  Usually, my way had great efficiencies but my gravity would be a few points low.  Your way, yesterday, gave me a more accurate OG.  Did that make the difference? 

Offline denny

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Re: 2010 Sept./Oct. - Batch Sparging
« Reply #35 on: August 30, 2010, 09:18:53 AM »
Denny, I haven't read all the responses so I don't know if this was brought up. 

Up until yesterday, I've been using a brewing calculator for my strike and sparge water calculations.  I usually ended up with about 8 gallons of preboil wort with my method which consisted of 3-4 gallons of strike water and 5-6 gallons of sparge water, depending on recipe. I would never try and split strike and sparge water 50/50 (like your method).  Usually, my way had great efficiencies but my gravity would be a few points low.  Your way, yesterday, gave me a more accurate OG.  Did that make the difference? 

I can't say for sure, but it's entirely possible it did.  You'd need to repeat exactly the same batch and procedure a few times to be certain, though.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline halenrush

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Re: 2010 Sept./Oct. - Batch Sparging
« Reply #36 on: August 31, 2010, 10:14:08 AM »
If I perfect your method, I'm starting to wonder if I can pull off 10 gallon batches in my 52qt mash tun.

Offline bluedog

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Re: 2010 Sept./Oct. - Batch Sparging
« Reply #37 on: September 02, 2010, 08:11:38 AM »
Hi Denny,

I have a question regarding your article on batch sparging. I have been fly sparging and anything to cut the time down on brew day would be great. My mash tun is a 10 gallon pot with a false bottom. The false bottom takes 1.25 gallons to fill. If I use this set up to batch sparge how do I account for the extra water in the false bottom. It seems most people batch sparging use a mesh screen instead of a false bottom.

Offline bonjour

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Re: 2010 Sept./Oct. - Batch Sparging
« Reply #38 on: September 02, 2010, 08:30:40 AM »
I batch sparge a bit differently, and I don't calculate.

1. mash normally
2. drain mash tun into boil kettle (after clearing the wort/vorlaufing)
3. measure the wort in the kettle
4. add either the full amount remaining or half the amount remaining
5. repeat as necessary from item 2.

Works every time and no worry about dead space.
Fred Bonjour
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AHA Governing Committee; AHA Conference, Club Support & Web Subcommittees



Everything under 1.100 is a 'session' beer ;)

Offline denny

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Re: 2010 Sept./Oct. - Batch Sparging
« Reply #39 on: September 02, 2010, 08:50:05 AM »
Hi Denny,

I have a question regarding your article on batch sparging. I have been fly sparging and anything to cut the time down on brew day would be great. My mash tun is a 10 gallon pot with a false bottom. The false bottom takes 1.25 gallons to fill. If I use this set up to batch sparge how do I account for the extra water in the false bottom. It seems most people batch sparging use a mesh screen instead of a false bottom.


Boy, that's one I haven't dealt with!  I assume you;d account for it the same way you do for fly sparging.  Is there much dead space or does it drain completely?
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline denny

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Re: 2010 Sept./Oct. - Batch Sparging
« Reply #40 on: September 02, 2010, 08:50:57 AM »
I batch sparge a bit differently, and I don't calculate.

1. mash normally
2. drain mash tun into boil kettle (after clearing the wort/vorlaufing)
3. measure the wort in the kettle
4. add either the full amount remaining or half the amount remaining
5. repeat as necessary from item 2.

Works every time and no worry about dead space.

The empirical method!  In my article, I address that in the section "Science or Seat of the Pants?".
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe