Author Topic: T-58 Yeast and Wheat DME  (Read 130 times)

Offline fredthecat

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T-58 Yeast and Wheat DME
« on: February 25, 2020, 05:14:40 PM »
Just running this by you. Again I'm an ancient homebrewer that is just getting back into it again after a few years off and am trying to tweak my setup for flavour and efficiency.

I haven't been happy with the way my water has been working so far (for another thread) so I'm going to:

1. use 20litres of distilled water (for a 5gal carboy)
2. single pack of t-58 yeast
3. 2kg of Briess Bavarian Wheat DME (I heard it's well made) and 1/2lb of crystal 10
4. ~16 IBU of noble hops


I've always found T-58 attenuates way over 80%, but I think I've always done higher OGs and added sugars with it. However some guides say it only attenuates 70% of maltose/maltotriose etc. Any suggestions? I already have the T-58 So i kind of just want to use it up.

Should I add minerals or nutrients if I'm using 100% distilled water, or will the DME have enough for a healthy ferment?


Hoping to start the T-58 around 55F, then raise it up to 60. Is that too cold?


Thanks, i'm hoping to make a basic quaffable beer without too many esters.

Offline Bob357

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Re: T-58 Yeast and Wheat DME
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2020, 06:20:27 PM »
When extract brewing, it's generally best to use RO or distilled water without any mineral additions. The water profile was taken care of in the mash when the extract was manufactured. As for the T-58, Fermentis lists an apparent attenuation range of 72 to 78%
The moderate fermentability of the extract and C-10 should help to keep you in the mid to lower end of the range. You might get a slow start at 55 degrees, but 60 should be fine for fermentation.
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Offline kramerog

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Re: T-58 Yeast and Wheat DME
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2020, 06:27:18 PM »
Here's a few answers (or maybe just opinions):
- Going to be very hard to fit 20l in a 5 gal carboy unless the gallons are imperial since 5 US gal = 19L.
- No minerals or nutrients needed
- 55F sounds too cold but I haven't used T58 recently to know.  If your sanitation practices are good, you can always try 55F and if it doesn't work raise the temperature slowly.  When working below the recommended temp range, you have to be patient.

Offline BrewnWKopperKat

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Re: T-58 Yeast and Wheat DME
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2020, 12:08:56 AM »
I've always found T-58 attenuates way over 80%, but I think I've always done higher OGs and added sugars with it. However some guides say it only attenuates 70% of maltose/maltotriose etc. Any suggestions? I already have the T-58 So i kind of just want to use it up.

Personally, I don't use S-33, T-58, or Windsor with my extract+steep batches as I find the result is too sweet for my taste. 

Starting at https://fermentis.com/en/tips-n-tricks/for-you-brewers/ , download the TOOL #1 / Tips & Tricks PDF, then go to page 43 to looks at the amount of the various sugars (including maltotriose) that are left behind.


Quote
Should I add minerals or nutrients if I'm using 100% distilled water, or will the DME have enough for a healthy ferment?

Yeast nutrient: Historically, I've added yeast nutrient as a "cheap insurance". 

Minerals (brewing salts): I generally won't attempt to "season to taste" on the 1st batch.  With hop-forward styles, I find that adding 0.25 to 0.50 (1/4 to 1/2) grams per gallon of gypsum can often make a good beer better.  Be aware that it's easy to over-mineralize a batch.



Offline fredthecat

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Re: T-58 Yeast and Wheat DME
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2020, 02:56:27 AM »



When extract brewing, it's generally best to use RO or distilled water without any mineral additions. The water profile was taken care of in the mash when the extract was manufactured. As for the T-58, Fermentis lists an apparent attenuation range of 72 to 78%
The moderate fermentability of the extract and C-10 should help to keep you in the mid to lower end of the range. You might get a slow start at 55 degrees, but 60 should be fine for fermentation.

yup, i think ill basically just go for 60 and then warm it up for the very end of active fermentation

Here's a few answers (or maybe just opinions):
- Going to be very hard to fit 20l in a 5 gal carboy unless the gallons are imperial since 5 US gal = 19L.
- No minerals or nutrients needed
- 55F sounds too cold but I haven't used T58 recently to know.  If your sanitation practices are good, you can always try 55F and if it doesn't work raise the temperature slowly.  When working below the recommended temp range, you have to be patient.

ya i thought about that volume, but after a 40 min boil i figure the 20L will be reduced enough.







Personally, I don't use S-33, T-58, or Windsor with my extract+steep batches as I find the result is too sweet for my taste. 

Starting at https://fermentis.com/en/tips-n-tricks/for-you-brewers/ , download the TOOL #1 / Tips & Tricks PDF, then go to page 43 to looks at the amount of the various sugars (including maltotriose) that are left behind.


Quote
Should I add minerals or nutrients if I'm using 100% distilled water, or will the DME have enough for a healthy ferment?

Yeast nutrient: Historically, I've added yeast nutrient as a "cheap insurance". 

Minerals (brewing salts): I generally won't attempt to "season to taste" on the 1st batch.  With hop-forward styles, I find that adding 0.25 to 0.50 (1/4 to 1/2) grams per gallon of gypsum can often make a good beer better.  Be aware that it's easy to over-mineralize a batch.

very good point about those yeasts and extract.  i hadnt used extract in a LONG time, but i did a 100% LME brew and it did full 79% attenutation with W34, so im tentatively going on that. also i forgot to mention im aiming for a low OG of about 1.044.. so if it only attenuates 70% even that will be fine with me.



also in a larger sense. Ya, i think I may be overmineralizing my beers while trying to adjust to my water profile. I looked up my city's water report, but it might be wrong. as it's a complicated water supply between different areas.