Author Topic: Barley Malt varietals and mouthfeel (maltiness)?  (Read 469 times)

Offline Silver_Is_Money

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Re: Barley Malt varietals and mouthfeel (maltiness)?
« Reply #15 on: February 29, 2020, 08:05:33 PM »
Perhaps the most simple and easy way to increase the perception of mouthfeel is to decrease carbonation.  Glycerol seems to play a big part as well.

Offline stpug

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Re: Barley Malt varietals and mouthfeel (maltiness)?
« Reply #16 on: February 29, 2020, 10:52:30 PM »
Perhaps the most simple and easy way to increase the perception of mouthfeel is to decrease carbonation.  Glycerol seems to play a big part as well.

I get the opposite perception from what you describe.  Less carbonation perceives as less body, less mouthfeel.  Still samples of beer always seem watery to me for average strength brews.

However, as you state, increased glycerol production does equate to increased mouthfeel to me, as well as increased foam production and stability.

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Barley Malt varietals and mouthfeel (maltiness)?
« Reply #17 on: March 02, 2020, 06:35:22 PM »
This document which I came across in another thread within this very forum provides at least a partial answer to my query.  Of the barley malt varieties tested, Harrington 2-Row has far and away the highest levels of Beta Glucan.  Could it be the malty mouthfeel champion?

http://www.montana.edu/barleybreeding/documents/Variety%20Release%202019%20-%20Buzz.pdf

Does anyone still grow Harrington?

Somebody must.  Rahr Standard 2-row is blended with it and Metcalf.

“Rahr - A great base malt from the Northwest made from Harrington and Metcalf barley grown in the USA and malted in Minnesota at the Rahr malt house. Well modified and perfect for single infusion mashes. Clean flavor with a nice, floral aroma with a sweet taste make Rahr 2-row a fast growing malt of choice for many commercial brewers. Try this in your next beer and see the difference.”


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That must come off an old description from the internet. The certificate of analysis I had from Rahr on the bags I bought of 2 row standard was 50% Pinnacle and 50% Copeland. The Pale Ale malt was 50% Copeland, 30% Metcalfe and 20% Synergy.

That’s interesting. I pulled that directly off the internet just before I posted it. I wonder why the difference in description.

I shot Rahr a note to see what they say.

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This is what the Rahr Rep said. Makes sense.

“The varieties that make up the blend have changed depending on the crop years, but to my knowledge, 50% Pinnacle and 50% Copeland are that varieties used in the standard 2row in made in 2020 and 2019.”


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