Author Topic: SafeLager W-34/70 Question  (Read 4228 times)

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2020, 06:47:16 pm »
Never saw that before.  I really like the character of 940.  I have used S23 but never considered it close to the character of 940 but I should try it again.  Most 34/70 brewers I know say the flavor characteristics of it are very similar to 2124 and I thought Diamond was too.  2124 has been a favorite lager yeast of mine for a very long time and I love the aroma of a beer made with it.  Then again, I could say that about a number of others too.  Cheers BB.

I have info from the manufacturers that both 34/70 and Diamnond are related to 2124.
Do you remember talking on the Blue Board about how Fermentis and Lallemand did not specifically say it was "dry 2124" but I believe they both said that the yeast was from Weihenstephan and also that it was "the most-used yeast strain in the world" which I think Wyeast claims about 2124 as well.  We concluded that they were dried versions of 2124 but we didn't really have any verification of that. 
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Offline denny

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2020, 06:49:42 pm »
Never saw that before.  I really like the character of 940.  I have used S23 but never considered it close to the character of 940 but I should try it again.  Most 34/70 brewers I know say the flavor characteristics of it are very similar to 2124 and I thought Diamond was too.  2124 has been a favorite lager yeast of mine for a very long time and I love the aroma of a beer made with it.  Then again, I could say that about a number of others too.  Cheers BB.

I have info from the manufacturers that both 34/70 and Diamnond are related to 2124.
Do you remember talking on the Blue Board about how Fermentis and Lallemand did not specifically say it was "dry 2124" but I believe they both said that the yeast was from Weihenstephan and also that it was "the most-used yeast strain in the world" which I think Wyeast claims about 2124 as well.  We concluded that they were dried versions of 2124 but we didn't really have any verification of that.

Yep.  I've gotten a bit more than that out of them since then, but I don't think any any of those 3 directly tell you what the origin is.
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Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #17 on: March 23, 2020, 08:42:21 pm »
Yep.  I've gotten a bit more than that out of them since then, but I don't think any any of those 3 directly tell you what the origin is.
Agreed.  What I can say is that Lallemand Diamond makes a delicious beer.  Much more character than say, S-189 which is an okay yeast and a clean fermenter but it's on the boring side. 
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TXFlyGuy

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #18 on: March 23, 2020, 10:49:10 pm »
Yep.  I've gotten a bit more than that out of them since then, but I don't think any any of those 3 directly tell you what the origin is.
Agreed.  What I can say is that Lallemand Diamond makes a delicious beer.  Much more character than say, S-189 which is an okay yeast and a clean fermenter but it's on the boring side.

How does it compare to 34/70, or a typical liquid (Wyeast) lager yeast?

How about lag time? Do you pitch direct, rehydrate, or make a starter?

Offline denny

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #19 on: March 23, 2020, 10:57:33 pm »
Yep.  I've gotten a bit more than that out of them since then, but I don't think any any of those 3 directly tell you what the origin is.
Agreed.  What I can say is that Lallemand Diamond makes a delicious beer.  Much more character than say, S-189 which is an okay yeast and a clean fermenter but it's on the boring side.

How does it compare to 34/70, or a typical liquid (Wyeast) lager yeast?

How about lag time? Do you pitch direct, rehydrate, or make a starter?

I pitch both Diamond and 34/70 direct, no rehydration.  I haven't had beers side by side with all 3, so it's hard to compare, but I'd say virtually identical.
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Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #20 on: March 23, 2020, 11:13:37 pm »
Yep, 1 pack in 5 gallons and I just sprinkled it over the top of the wort and I had active fermentation in 16 hours.  The flavor profile seems very much like 2124 to me.  I made a wide variety of beers with it... pilsner, helles, a czech-style lager, a dark Mexican lager, a bock, an amber... all very nice. 
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Offline BrewBama

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SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #21 on: March 24, 2020, 01:06:32 am »

How about lag time? Do you pitch direct, rehydrate, or make a starter?

This is how I pitch (fill the cone, sprinkle on top, wait a few minutes, complete the fill) and the pitch rate to ensure fast start (I avg the recommendation to 1 g per liter).




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« Last Edit: March 24, 2020, 01:11:39 am by BrewBama »
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Offline KellerBrauer

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #22 on: March 24, 2020, 12:35:35 pm »
Thank you!  I must have missed this thread about this yeast!  Oops!!

Ill relax and have a Home Brew!

Thanks All!!  :)

Yes...have a beer and relax! I did a very small (3 gal) batch with excess wort, and pitched one packet of 34/70 just a few days ago. It is just now beginning to show signs of fermentation.

Patience is a virtue.

It appeared as if fermentation started late yesterday evening.  Sure enough, it’s in full swing this morning.  I have never experienced a lag time of nearly 30 hours.  Crazy!  But, okay. 

Thanks to everyone for their input! 
Joliet, IL

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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #23 on: March 24, 2020, 01:09:06 pm »
Have to ask - are you simply observing the airlock or were you seeing the krausen forming?
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Offline KellerBrauer

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #24 on: March 24, 2020, 01:21:53 pm »
Have to ask - are you simply observing the airlock or were you seeing the krausen forming?

Both, actually.  First, the beer was and still is, quite clear.  It still has not gotten cloudy as it usually does.  Also, I’m using a blowoff tube in a flask and the liquid in the blowoff tube was at the exact same level as the liquid in the flask.  So that told me there was no CO2 pressure in the carboy.  Lastly, the foam that gets generated while filling the carboy almost completely diminished until late yesterday when I finally began to see new Krausen starting to form.  This morning I have about 2” of Krausen and a very active blowoff.
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TXFlyGuy

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #25 on: March 24, 2020, 02:05:59 pm »
Thank you!  I must have missed this thread about this yeast!  Oops!!

Ill relax and have a Home Brew!

Thanks All!!  :)

Yes...have a beer and relax! I did a very small (3 gal) batch with excess wort, and pitched one packet of 34/70 just a few days ago. It is just now beginning to show signs of fermentation.

Patience is a virtue.

It appeared as if fermentation started late yesterday evening.  Sure enough, it’s in full swing this morning.  I have never experienced a lag time of nearly 30 hours.  Crazy!  But, okay. 

Thanks to everyone for their input!

30+ hours is quite typical for this yeast. Not crazy, but standard. Search the internet and you will find this is common. What is not common is fast ferment starts. Our last brew with this yeast took 36 hours to show initial signs of activity. And we followed the textbook rules for pitching.

https://fermentis.com/en/tips-n-tricks/for-you-brewers/

Offline HopDen

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2020, 03:00:10 pm »
Greetings - I brewed a German Amber Kellerbier yesterday using the SafeLager 34/70 yeast.  I rehydrated and pitched at about 4:00PM into 62°F wort after a typical aeration.  After pitching, I placed my fermenter into my fermentation chamber and set the temperature to 55°.  It’s now about 16 hours later and I see no sign of fermentation.  I raised the temp this morning to 70° to try and get some action.  Any ideas?  I’ve never experienced a lag-time this long.  Is this a slow starting yeast?

34/70 is my go to lager yeast. I have pitched as low as 48* and have seen signs of fermentation in as little as 12 hours. I pitch big, maybe overpitch but I want activity sooner rather than later although 24-36 hours isn't going to hurt anything.

When using fresh, I pitch directly onto the wort, no need to rehydrate. It is a waste of time IMO. I also harvest my yeast and make a starter a few days prior to brew day. Also, pitch the yeast, whether dry or harvested, at fermentation temps. If you pitch higher than fermentation temps or IMO above 60* you run the risk of esters that you don't want in lagers.

Offline KellerBrauer

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #27 on: March 24, 2020, 06:49:31 pm »
Thank you!  I must have missed this thread about this yeast!  Oops!!

Ill relax and have a Home Brew!

Thanks All!!  :)

Yes...have a beer and relax! I did a very small (3 gal) batch with excess wort, and pitched one packet of 34/70 just a few days ago. It is just now beginning to show signs of fermentation.

Patience is a virtue.

It appeared as if fermentation started late yesterday evening.  Sure enough, it’s in full swing this morning.  I have never experienced a lag time of nearly 30 hours.  Crazy!  But, okay. 

Thanks to everyone for their input!

30+ hours is quite typical for this yeast. Not crazy, but standard. Search the internet and you will find this is common. What is not common is fast ferment starts. Our last brew with this yeast took 36 hours to show initial signs of activity. And we followed the textbook rules for pitching.

https://fermentis.com/en/tips-n-tricks/for-you-brewers/

That's one of the intricacies of this hobby - we never stop learning.  I'm just fortunate I found the answers I was looking for very quickly.  I have taken great notes on my experience so the next time I use this yeast, I'll know what to expect.  Trust me, I went over my process again and again thinking I missed a step or I did something that killed my yeast!  Thanks for your help!
Joliet, IL

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Offline denny

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #28 on: March 24, 2020, 06:53:33 pm »
I wonder why we have such a variety of results.  Some see long lag times, others don't, uwwong the same procedures.  What do you suppose makes the difference?
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Offline KellerBrauer

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Re: SafeLager W-34/70 Question
« Reply #29 on: March 24, 2020, 06:55:16 pm »
Greetings - I brewed a German Amber Kellerbier yesterday using the SafeLager 34/70 yeast.  I rehydrated and pitched at about 4:00PM into 62°F wort after a typical aeration.  After pitching, I placed my fermenter into my fermentation chamber and set the temperature to 55°.  It’s now about 16 hours later and I see no sign of fermentation.  I raised the temp this morning to 70° to try and get some action.  Any ideas?  I’ve never experienced a lag-time this long.  Is this a slow starting yeast?

34/70 is my go to lager yeast. I have pitched as low as 48* and have seen signs of fermentation in as little as 12 hours. I pitch big, maybe overpitch but I want activity sooner rather than later although 24-36 hours isn't going to hurt anything.

When using fresh, I pitch directly onto the wort, no need to rehydrate. It is a waste of time IMO. I also harvest my yeast and make a starter a few days prior to brew day. Also, pitch the yeast, whether dry or harvested, at fermentation temps. If you pitch higher than fermentation temps or IMO above 60* you run the risk of esters that you don't want in lagers.

I agree with you on the re-hydration aspect.  The reason why I like to re-hydrate my dry yeast is to make it easier to pitch onto my carboy.  Too many times I have pitched dry directly onto the carboy and much of the yeast sticks to the walls of the glass and I end up having to put extra work into getting it off.  I'm sure the little bit stuck on the walls may not make a difference - I think its more of an OC thing.  :-\
Joliet, IL

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