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Author Topic: Gelatin Question  (Read 2840 times)

Offline jeffy

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Re: Gelatin Question
« Reply #15 on: April 02, 2020, 08:35:42 am »
I have watched as gelatin cleared beer in a glass carboy.  Pour the warm mixture onto cold beer and you can see it create a layer on top due to temperature stratification.  This layer gradually drops to the bottom taking the haze with it.  A few hours is all it really takes in my experience.

It has been 18 hours on my keg. Followed the advice here on the correct technique for application. No clearing as of 0650 CDT. None. Cloudy/hazy. Dang it!

Hmmm.  I had to fine my Wee Heavy for the NHC First Round (now cancelled) because it was still a bit hazy.  Fined it with Gelatin in the keg and after pouring off the first pint or two, it was totally clear.  It only sat for a day in the kegerator and probably cleared before that.   Plan to try Brewbama's technique in the future.
Note:  I just poured the warm gelatin mixture into the top of the beer in the keg while keeping the CO2 on to prevent O2 from getting in.  Wonder what the difference between your experience and mine is?
Different kinds of haze require different kinds of fining.  I have once or twice had to use biofine in addition to gelatin.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
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Offline Richard

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Re: Gelatin Question
« Reply #16 on: April 02, 2020, 08:57:36 am »
I like your method. Obviously, everyone has a different method and I have been heating the water (I too use 2/3 cup) to boiling to sterilize it.  Put a coaster over the beaker and allow it to cool to 150 degrees (takes about 10 minutes max).  I add the gelatin and allow it to "bloom", then carefully pour it into the secondary fermenter (a.k.a brite tank).  I will clear pretty quickly but allowing it to set for a day or so is even more beneficial, then keg it.

I have been doing it Goose's way. I boil the water to sanitize it and to drive out any dissolved oxygen. Then cool it down and add the gelatin around 150, then pour it into the fermenter. What is the reason for letting it sit? What is this "blooming" that you are talking about?
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Offline tommymorris

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Gelatin Question
« Reply #17 on: April 02, 2020, 09:08:49 am »
I like your method. Obviously, everyone has a different method and I have been heating the water (I too use 2/3 cup) to boiling to sterilize it.  Put a coaster over the beaker and allow it to cool to 150 degrees (takes about 10 minutes max).  I add the gelatin and allow it to "bloom", then carefully pour it into the secondary fermenter (a.k.a brite tank).  I will clear pretty quickly but allowing it to set for a day or so is even more beneficial, then keg it.

I have been doing it Goose's way. I boil the water to sanitize it and to drive out any dissolved oxygen. Then cool it down and add the gelatin around 150, then pour it into the fermenter. What is the reason for letting it sit? What is this "blooming" that you are talking about?
Blooming = Sprinkle the dry gelatin on the water surface and let sit five minutes.

https://bakingbites.com/2016/07/how-to-bloom-gelatin/

Offline Visor

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Re: Gelatin Question
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2020, 11:03:37 am »
   A million ways to skin a cat, I pull 1C or so of beer, sprinkle 1/2 a package [~1 teaspoon] on the surface at room temperature, let it stand for a few minutes until the gelatin dissolves, heat to ~150, dump it back in the FV, stir well, purge as best I can the FV with CO2 and stick it in the fridge. Usually works pretty well, sometimes better than others.
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TXFlyGuy

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Re: Gelatin Question
« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2020, 11:04:26 am »
Update:
In the period of the last 6 hours, the beer has gone from foggy/hazy to near crystal clear. Guess it just takes awhile for the gelatin to work.

Offline Richard

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Re: Gelatin Question
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2020, 07:37:33 pm »
Blooming = Sprinkle the dry gelatin on the water surface and let sit five minutes.

https://bakingbites.com/2016/07/how-to-bloom-gelatin/

OK, it looks like this is a way to avoid clumping when using room temperature water. I thought perhaps there was some chemical change going on, but I guess not. When I mix the gelatin into warm water I don't have a problem with clumping. It all seems to dissolve nicely, so I guess if that is the case I can proceed right away (as I have been doing).
Original Gravity - that would be Newton's

TXFlyGuy

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Re: Gelatin Question
« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2020, 05:33:22 pm »
As our Munich Helles is now commercial quality clear, absolutely sparkling clear, we have added gelatin to a recently kegged brew of Kolsch.

But this time instead of water, we used sterile hopped wort for the medium. Added the gelatin at 72 degrees, let it "bloom", mixed it in thoroughly. Then heated it up to 145 degrees F, and dumped it into the keg of Kolsch, which is 32 degrees.

Hoping for good results. Note that Wyeast claims this yeast requires filtration or extra long lagering to become clear.

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: Gelatin Question
« Reply #22 on: April 04, 2020, 05:40:42 pm »
Not sure if it was mentioned already but one tip is to make sure you're adding the gel solution to COLD beer.  The haze forms when the beer gets cold so you want to attack it at the right time.  I know there are all kinds of other clarifiers out there but a simple gel solution has always worked well for me.

Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

TXFlyGuy

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Re: Gelatin Question
« Reply #23 on: April 04, 2020, 05:50:29 pm »
Not sure if it was mentioned already but one tip is to make sure you're adding the gel solution to COLD beer.  The haze forms when the beer gets cold so you want to attack it at the right time.  I know there are all kinds of other clarifiers out there but a simple gel solution has always worked well for me.



That is a fine looking beer! And our Helles now looks as clear. I'm sold on gelatin. Yes, add it to cold beer, 38 or colder.

Might help myself to some of those nuts...

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: Gelatin Question
« Reply #24 on: April 04, 2020, 06:03:33 pm »
LOL.

I have a bud who likes Biofine for clarification.  I also have another colloidal silicon dioxide solution that I got on Amazon.  You apply it twice... once where you agitate the solution (shake, stir, etc) and then again 24 hours later without agitation.  I tried it a few times differing my process and it never seemed to work.  Plus... it required TWO applications instead of one.  So I stick with gel solution because it just seems to work for me.  Another piece of this is making sure that as little trub goes from kettle to fermenter as possible.  If you can get mostly clear wort going into the fermenter you will have an easier time getting things to clear downstream.  Cheers.
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

Offline HopDen

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Re: Gelatin Question
« Reply #25 on: April 04, 2020, 07:06:11 pm »
As our Munich Helles is now commercial quality clear, absolutely sparkling clear, we have added gelatin to a recently kegged brew of Kolsch.

But this time instead of water, we used sterile hopped wort for the medium. Added the gelatin at 72 degrees, let it "bloom", mixed it in thoroughly. Then heated it up to 145 degrees F, and dumped it into the keg of Kolsch, which is 32 degrees.

Hoping for good results. Note that Wyeast claims this yeast requires filtration or extra long lagering to become clear.

Which yeast are you speaking of?

TXFlyGuy

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Re: Gelatin Question
« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2020, 07:12:28 pm »
As our Munich Helles is now commercial quality clear, absolutely sparkling clear, we have added gelatin to a recently kegged brew of Kolsch.

But this time instead of water, we used sterile hopped wort for the medium. Added the gelatin at 72 degrees, let it "bloom", mixed it in thoroughly. Then heated it up to 145 degrees F, and dumped it into the keg of Kolsch, which is 32 degrees.

Hoping for good results. Note that Wyeast claims this yeast requires filtration or extra long lagering to become clear.

Which yeast are you speaking of?

Wyeast 2565
This powdery strain results in yeast that remain in suspension post fermentation. It requires filtration or additional settling time to produce bright beers.