Author Topic: Testing a keg with water  (Read 335 times)

Offline wrssqb

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 3
Testing a keg with water
« on: April 20, 2020, 11:58:45 PM »
I had a keg of Ordinary Bitter with a problem of air in the beer line. I switched beer lines, to no avail. I switched the post o-ring, to no avail. Now that the keg is empty, I checked the poppet and dip tube o-rings and don't see or feel any issues. I had to change CO2 tanks while I was burst carbonating this keg, so I'm wondering if it was over-carbonated. Can I check for air in the line using water in the keg, or will it not develop air in the line like the beer did? I'm almost certain that it won't foam at the faucet like the beer, but if I can see air in the line like I could with the beer...

Anyway, trying to narrow down the cause of this issue. Any thoughts are appreciated. Thank you.

Offline Slowbrew

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2741
  • The Slowly Losing IT Brewery in Urbandale, IA
Re: Testing a keg with water
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2020, 10:54:11 AM »
My first reaction reading your post was over carbonation.  Excess CO2 will break out of suspension in the lines when they still idle. 

Paul
Where the heck are we going?  And what's with this hand basket?

Offline reverseapachemaster

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3460
    • Brain Sparging on Brewing
Re: Testing a keg with water
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2020, 01:52:07 PM »
I agree that bubbles in the line more likely means excessive carbonation. If you had an air leak on a system with positive pressure from serving pressure you are more likely to drain your CO2 tank through the leak than take on air from the environment.
Heck yeah I blog about homebrewing: Brain Sparging on Brewing

Offline goose

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 933
Re: Testing a keg with water
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2020, 01:57:45 PM »
My first reaction reading your post was over carbonation.  Excess CO2 will break out of suspension in the lines when they still idle. 

Paul

I normally see this in my beer lines.   I usually carbonate at 10 PSI for about a week before drinking unless I (or more specifically my wife, with IPA) can't stand to wait, then it is 15 PSI for a couple days and put it on tap.  I serve at around 8 PSI and my lines are 3/8" vinyl and 10 feet long (calculated as per the literature on balancing the serving system).  If I increase the serving pressure, I get way more foam in the glass.  I am going to replace my lines with the ones that Rob Stein recommended (have to look up what they are again) which will hopefully fix the problem.
Goose Steingass
Wooster, OH
Society of Akron Area Zymurgists (SAAZ)
Wayne County Brew Club
Mansfield Brew Club
BJCP Certified
AHA Governing Committee Member