Author Topic: Inlet tube and outlet tube?  (Read 836 times)

TXFlyGuy

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Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« on: April 26, 2020, 04:00:11 PM »
Question...we are kegging beer today (Yippee!).
But how about this, we want to swap out the outlet tube (the long one), for the inlet tube. We will use floating pick up tubes for the beer "out" side. But can we use the long tube on the CO2 side? Would this help with carbonation, letting the CO2 bubble up through the beer?

Bad idea? Good idea?

What say you?

Offline HopDen

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2020, 04:09:26 PM »
Question...we are kegging beer today (Yippee!).
But how about this, we want to swap out the outlet tube (the long one), for the inlet tube. We will use floating pick up tubes for the beer "out" side. But can we use the long tube on the CO2 side? Would this help with carbonation, letting the CO2 bubble up through the beer?

Bad idea? Good idea?

What say you?

No need to swap the dip tube to the other side. Just swap out the ball lock gas connector with a liquid connector and carb away. Don't try and force carb too hard and fast, just set the CO2 to whatever volumes the beer style dictates and wait for a few days or week. I have carbed this way and it works well.

Offline denny

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2020, 04:32:02 PM »
I have experimented with this many times.  It is no faster to carb through the liquid tube than the gas tube.
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Offline HopDen

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2020, 04:38:49 PM »
I have experimented with this many times.  It is no faster to carb through the liquid tube than the gas tube.

It would seem to me that it would take longer to reach the desired saturation by having the gas bear down on the liquid instead of percolating up through the liquid. Can you give us more insight on how you came to your conclusion?

Thanks Denny

TXFlyGuy

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2020, 04:39:23 PM »
Thanks guys. We will experiment and see how it goes! Always learning something new...who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks (besides my wife)?

Offline denny

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2020, 05:18:15 PM »
I have experimented with this many times.  It is no faster to carb through the liquid tube than the gas tube.

It would seem to me that it would take longer to reach the desired saturation by having the gas bear down on the liquid instead of percolating up through the liquid. Can you give us more insight on how you came to your conclusion?

Thanks Denny

By direct comparison several times.  I have a 5 way CO2 manifold with flare connectors.  I unscrew one of the gas connectors and replace it with a beer connector.  I hook up 2 kegs of split batch at the same time.  Since they both come off the same regulator theyre obviously at the same pressure.  Then it's simply a mtter of comparing the beer from the 2 kegs at various times.  I have never found a difference.  Its one of those homebrewing things that seem like it should make a difference but doesn't.   At least, it never has for me in a dozen + trials.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline denny

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2020, 05:19:23 PM »
Thanks guys. We will experiment and see how it goes! Always learning something new...who says you can't teach an old dog new tricks (besides my wife)?

Indeed.  Exactly what I said here....https://www.experimentalbrew.com/blogs/denny/old-dognew-tricks
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline Megary

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2020, 05:34:45 PM »
Is there any potential drawback to having the short CO2 tube in the beer?  Thinking it best to leave the short tube to fill from the top of the beer, I usually fill my Keg to just below the tube.  I have considered cutting 1/2" off so I can squeeze in another glass of beer, but if it doesn't matter....

Offline HopDen

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2020, 05:40:21 PM »
I have experimented with this many times.  It is no faster to carb through the liquid tube than the gas tube.

It would seem to me that it would take longer to reach the desired saturation by having the gas bear down on the liquid instead of percolating up through the liquid. Can you give us more insight on how you came to your conclusion?

Thanks Denny

By direct comparison several times.  I have a 5 way CO2 manifold with flare connectors.  I unscrew one of the gas connectors and replace it with a beer connector.  I hook up 2 kegs of split batch at the same time.  Since they both come off the same regulator theyre obviously at the same pressure.  Then it's simply a mtter of comparing the beer from the 2 kegs at various times.  I have never found a difference.  Its one of those homebrewing things that seem like it should make a difference but doesn't.   At least, it never has for me in a dozen + trials.

Well I can't argue with that!! Thanks for sharing!

Offline denny

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2020, 06:00:23 PM »
I have experimented with this many times.  It is no faster to carb through the liquid tube than the gas tube.

It would seem to me that it would take longer to reach the desired saturation by having the gas bear down on the liquid instead of percolating up through the liquid. Can you give us more insight on how you came to your conclusion?

Thanks Denny

By direct comparison several times.  I have a 5 way CO2 manifold with flare connectors.  I unscrew one of the gas connectors and replace it with a beer connector.  I hook up 2 kegs of split batch at the same time.  Since they both come off the same regulator theyre obviously at the same pressure.  Then it's simply a mtter of comparing the beer from the 2 kegs at various times.  I have never found a difference.  Its one of those homebrewing things that seem like it should make a difference but doesn't.   At least, it never has for me in a dozen + trials.

Well I can't argue with that!! Thanks for sharing!

You bet!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline Bob357

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2020, 09:38:44 PM »
The only thing that would likely make introducing the CO2 from the bottom would be using a carbonation stone. Without a fine stone, the bubbles would just pass through the beer and end up bearing on the top, just the same as introducing the CO2 to the head space..
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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2020, 10:04:07 PM »
Is there any potential drawback to having the short CO2 tube in the beer?  Thinking it best to leave the short tube to fill from the top of the beer, I usually fill my Keg to just below the tube.  I have considered cutting 1/2" off so I can squeeze in another glass of beer, but if it doesn't matter....
I cut my CO2 dip tube off flush with the housing. The only thing that dip tube does is keep the o-ring in place. I cut mine so I can empty the all sanitizer out when I purge the keg.


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Offline Megary

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #12 on: April 27, 2020, 06:53:04 PM »
Is there any potential drawback to having the short CO2 tube in the beer?  Thinking it best to leave the short tube to fill from the top of the beer, I usually fill my Keg to just below the tube.  I have considered cutting 1/2" off so I can squeeze in another glass of beer, but if it doesn't matter....
I cut my CO2 dip tube off flush with the housing. The only thing that dip tube does is keep the o-ring in place. I cut mine so I can empty the all sanitizer out when I purge the keg.


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Gracias.  I'll be giving mine a haircut next chance I get.

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2020, 08:46:36 PM »
An alternative to cutting the tube is stainless washers.  I have a couple kegs like that and they work just fine.

Don't recall the size.
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Offline denny

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Re: Inlet tube and outlet tube?
« Reply #14 on: May 28, 2020, 03:02:24 PM »
You can slip a piece of vinyl tubing on a diptube if you need to extend it after it's been cut
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell