Author Topic: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?  (Read 4768 times)

Offline fredthecat

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Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« on: May 12, 2020, 08:37:10 pm »
I used it a long, long time ago, so long ago I don't even have notes on that beer anymore. Edit: I did find the notes. it just says "off yeast taste" then later notes say "off yeast taste is 80% gone" after weeks later.

I remember not liking it. But it is 2020, I want a cheap and clean yeast other than S05, and want to try nottingham for the heck of it.

Would you recommend it?
« Last Edit: May 12, 2020, 08:39:16 pm by fredthecat »

Offline TANSTAAFB

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Re: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2020, 08:52:23 pm »
I had the same off experience years ago and never tried it again. I'd love to hear the Notty success stories! I've really enjoyed Fermentis’ 34/70 as a clean, go either way yeast. Or  Bry-97 as a dry Chico alternative.

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Offline jeffy

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Re: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2020, 05:02:12 am »
I used Nottingham recently in half a batch of Rye APA, the other half with BRY-97.  I prefer the Nottingham.
I had not used this yeast in about 28 years, when it used to come in a packaged kit beer.  Now that it can be purchased fresh like any other dry yeast, I believe all the previous memories of off flavors are in the past.
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Offline Fire Rooster

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Re: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2020, 05:22:18 am »
https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/docs/products/tds/TDS_LALBREW_PREM_NOTTINGHAM_ENGLISH_DIGITAL.pdf

I don't have enough experience to comment in detail.
However, after 20 consecutive batches using this yeast,
I can confirm it's slightly fruity to neutral (to the best of my ability).
These perceived results are from fermenting many styles, with 4.25 gallons,
at ambient 54-58F, for 3-4 weeks.  Yeast was always pitched directly into wort.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2020, 02:18:57 am by Fire Rooster »

Offline Northern_Brewer

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Re: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2020, 05:46:13 am »
It's complicated. Some people seem to really not get on with Notty, yet plenty of people use it happily (it's very widely used in UK commercial microbreweries) and I'm not sure anyone's quite figured out why.

So I'd suggest if you don't get on with it, use BRY-97 or 34/70 or whatever.

One thing Notty is really useful for is as a "helper" yeast added at high krausen or so to help other yeast flocc out and to squeeze an extra bit of attenuation out of lower attenuation strains. Windsor followed by Notty is a classic combination of dry yeast for UK styles.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2020, 05:55:03 am »
It's complicated. Some people seem to really not get on with Notty, yet plenty of people use it happily (it's very widely used in UK commercial microbreweries) and I'm not sure anyone's quite figured out why.

So I'd suggest if you don't get on with it, use BRY-97 or 34/70 or whatever.

One thing Notty is really useful for is as a "helper" yeast added at high krausen or so to help other yeast flocc out and to squeeze an extra bit of attenuation out of lower attenuation strains. Windsor followed by Notty is a classic combination of dry yeast for UK styles.

I use the Windsor/Notty combo a couple of times a year and never got any off flavors. I haven't used Nottingham on its own in years, but that's only because I've already settled on US-05 as my clean ale yeast of choice from years of use and familiarity.
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Offline Silver_Is_Money

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Re: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2020, 06:58:25 am »
Nottingham simply needs to be kept on the colder side in order to be considered clean.  S-O5 is well more heat forgiving in this regard.  That is (in my opinion) why in comparison of the outcomes of these two, S-O5 often wins.  I.E. Nottingham fails to live up to S-05 because people treat it as if it actually is S-05, when it is not.  Nottingham can be successfully used as an ale yeast substitute for lager yeast, and will ferment at 50 degrees F.  If kept at or below a cut-off point of about 62 degrees (at most) it is clean.  It simply is not SO5 like as to its temperature profile, and Lallemand does it a major injustice by implying otherwise.

PS:  If you simply pitch Nottingham in a refrigerated environment maintained at 62 degrees, it will heat the Wort to potentially as high as 72 degrees, and it will fail and taste awful.  The Wort itself needs to be actively maintained at (or below) 62 degrees for Nottingham, not the air environment around it.  It also does not explode and head out the blow-off tube when so maintained.  In fact, at the proper temperatures it doesn't even need a blow off tube.  If you see it heading out the blow-off tube, this is a good indication that the beer will taste "off".
« Last Edit: May 13, 2020, 07:00:46 am by Silver_Is_Money »

Offline BrewBama

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Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2020, 08:05:33 am »
I must have missed it somewhere but I’ve not seen the mfr suggesting Nottingham is a US-05 like.




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« Last Edit: May 13, 2020, 08:07:22 am by BrewBama »

Offline denny

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Re: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2020, 08:07:36 am »
I used Nottingham recently in half a batch of Rye APA, the other half with BRY-97.  I prefer the Nottingham.
I had not used this yeast in about 28 years, when it used to come in a packaged kit beer.  Now that it can be purchased fresh like any other dry yeast, I believe all the previous memories of off flavors are in the past.

I'm a big fan of BRY97 and I'd love to hear your thoughts comparing them.
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Offline Silver_Is_Money

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Re: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #9 on: May 13, 2020, 08:44:36 am »
I must have missed it somewhere but I’ve not seen the mfr suggesting Nottingham is a US-05 like.

I hope I didn't in any way imply that, as I was arguing quite the opposite.  I said that in my opinion (subject of course to being right or wrong, as for any opinion) many home brewers seem to make that assumption.  And that Lallemand doesn't help things by implying that Nottingham can successfully be used at temperatures generally up to the range seen for US-05.  In none of this does Lallemand imply that Nottingham is similar to US-05.

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2020, 10:05:38 am »
Interesting thread. I had given up on Nottingham yeast, but might revisit using it.
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2020, 12:30:30 pm »
I must have missed it somewhere but I’ve not seen the mfr suggesting Nottingham is a US-05 like.

I hope I didn't in any way imply that, as I was arguing quite the opposite.  I said that in my opinion (subject of course to being right or wrong, as for any opinion) many home brewers seem to make that assumption.  And that Lallemand doesn't help things by implying that Nottingham can successfully be used at temperatures generally up to the range seen for US-05.  In none of this does Lallemand imply that Nottingham is similar to US-05.
I guess I’m confused. I don’t think they’ve implied anything.

I believe they have a suggested fermentation temp range based on sensory analysis and their products can be successfully used within the guidelines provides.

If it is the same temp range as another yeast that is no implication they are the same strain. I’ve never heard anyone say they were based on temp range until you did here today. 

Bry-97 and Windsor have the same recommended fermentation temp range as well. They aren’t the same either.

I’m sorry if I am missing the point.


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Offline tommymorris

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Re: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2020, 12:59:48 pm »
I must have missed it somewhere but I’ve not seen the mfr suggesting Nottingham is a US-05 like.

I hope I didn't in any way imply that, as I was arguing quite the opposite.  I said that in my opinion (subject of course to being right or wrong, as for any opinion) many home brewers seem to make that assumption.  And that Lallemand doesn't help things by implying that Nottingham can successfully be used at temperatures generally up to the range seen for US-05.  In none of this does Lallemand imply that Nottingham is similar to US-05.
I guess I’m confused. I don’t think they’ve implied anything.

I believe they have a suggested fermentation temp range based on sensory analysis and their products can be successfully used within the guidelines provides.

If it is the same temp range as another yeast that is no implication they are the same strain. I’ve never heard anyone say they were based on temp range until you did here today. 

Bry-97 and Windsor have the same recommended fermentation temp range as well. They aren’t the same either.

I’m sorry if I am missing the point.


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The sensory diagram in the Nottingham data sheet shows basically neutral yeast flavors and the temp range listed in the data sheet is pretty wide. That implies neutral across the whole temp range. This is more true for some yeasts than others (true for 34/70, Bry-97).

I wish yeast providers gave more data across more conditions.

Reading homebrewer forums can tell you a lot more about how a yeast behaves across a variety of conditions: temp ranges, pitch rates, etc.

I don’t mean to throw Nottingham under the bus. Generalizations based on one test condition are common for lots of yeast’s data sheets.

Offline mdyer909

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Re: Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2020, 04:07:30 pm »
I use it and like it.  I just ferment at ambient temperatures, but even in the summer it rarely gets above 70 at my place, and I tend to brew English style bitters in the late summer to drink in the fall, so it’s probably fermented cooler.

Offline BrewBama

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Would you recommend nottingham yeast in 2020?
« Reply #14 on: May 13, 2020, 04:08:02 pm »
If they’ve done anything close to what Fermentis has done based on their presentation at HBC, they ck several temps, OG, and pitch rates to draw their conclusions.

Of course, I’m also assuming Fermentis has performed this analysis across their product line. The presentation only discussed 34/70.


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« Last Edit: May 13, 2020, 04:22:11 pm by BrewBama »