Author Topic: what would you tell an early 30s north american man to do with his life?  (Read 2377 times)

Offline MDixon

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The would not call it work if it were fun, it would be called fun. Hating your job and disliking portions of it are two different things. If it is affecting your well being then find something else. I had a job for 9 years which was torture at the end. One of the best days was driving away with a separation package. A job which is causing an overwhelming amount of stress and anxiety is not a good thing. Often you don't recognize how bad it was until you do something else.
It's not a popularity contest, it's beer!

Offline jeffy

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Man, all these replies reminded me of the poem Desiderata, which made me remember the parody, Deteriorata:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggIQpmUhu10
I also recommend as much travel as you can, sometimes even if you can't seem to afford it.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995

Offline denny

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My advice...don't start your own business.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline Village Taphouse

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My advice...don't start your own business.
It's not for everyone but it can be rewarding.  I would say, "Don't open your own restaurant".  :P

The travel is interesting.  Some people like it.  Others do not.  If travel interests you, I agree that traveling the US is great and even driving some long stretches of it.  But international travel is really eye-opening and fun.  My family and I have been to Mexico, Costa Rica, a bunch of spots in the Caribbean and also Munich, Vienna, Prague, Warsaw, Brataslava, Frankfurt, Croatia, Athens and Santorini.  Actually getting where you're going is not glamorous.  But being there and meeting people and seeing how others live, their scenery, buildings that might be 800 or 1000 years old, that's amazing.  To eat their food, drink their beer and sit and talk with them is really cool.  If travel is not your thing, ignore it and focus on what DOES interest you. 
Ken from Chicago

Offline denny

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I owned and ran a recording studio for 30 years.  Should be a dream job...writing and recording music for film and video.  It was cool at first.  After 30 years it was just another job I had to go to every day.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline Village Taphouse

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I owned and ran a recording studio for 30 years.  Should be a dream job...writing and recording music for film and video.  It was cool at first.  After 30 years it was just another job I had to go to every day.
But the idea that you were your own boss, made your schedule or any of that... worth it or better than working for the man or no?  I never set out to do it.  It just happened that way.  :)
Ken from Chicago

Offline erockrph

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I owned and ran a recording studio for 30 years.  Should be a dream job...writing and recording music for film and video.  It was cool at first.  After 30 years it was just another job I had to go to every day.
This is why I say "No" every time I get asked if I'm going to open my own brewery. Once your hobby becomes your job, it's not a hobby any more.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline pete b

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I owned and ran a recording studio for 30 years.  Should be a dream job...writing and recording music for film and video.  It was cool at first.  After 30 years it was just another job I had to go to every day.
This is why I say "No" every time I get asked if I'm going to open my own brewery. Once your hobby becomes your job, it's not a hobby any more.
My passion is food and I was a chef for 20 years, starting as a line cook at night while paying for school. Ever since I got out of the restaurant business my passion for cooking has increased and it’s what I do to unwind. I was sick of cooking in restaurants and thank god that’s not my career in these times.
On the other hand my wife was in accounting and finance for a similar amount of time but hated it while spending much of her free time on her passion, art, mostly painting. A few years ago she quit her job and became a full time artist and author of books related to her art. She is so much happier. So you can turn your passion into a business if you do it right. I think the key for her is that she is working for herself with no employees. Unless managing people is your passion that is the stressful part of owning a business.
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline MDixon

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I forgot one, and it's a big one.

Don't burn bridges. You may need to cross that bridge again.


A few stories to solidify this point. My Brother-In-Law worked while he went to school in a tire recapping plant. It was grimey, dirty work and he hated it and the way he was valued or at least how he thought he was valued. When he was offered and accepted a new job after college he was going to tell off his boss and ultimately decided not to do so, worked out his notice and went on his way. Within six months the new job had layoffs. He was new so he was put on the sidelines. He went back to the plant and they increased his pay and position. He worked there until he was called back to the other job. The recapping plant asked him if he would work part time and set his own hours. He did so for many years and it allowed them enough money to build a house. Had he told off the boss none of that would have been possible.

I recently left a good employer. Worked every second of my notice and have seen both the owner and my previous boss since. I am confident if I needed to come back they would fire my replacement and let me come back.

One other work tidbit. Use LinkedIn as a tool to improve your career. It is not Facebook. You should not use it for fun, use it for work. Your contacts can be your friends, but a better use is to network with professionals who are in jobs you want or can get you into jobs you might want. Your profile on LinkedIn should mirror your resume. My current employer found me via LinkedIn and it has worked out well.
It's not a popularity contest, it's beer!

Offline scrap iron

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All very good advise above. I would just say as someone said before don't burn bridges. As a Senior citizen I would add take time to enjoy the little things in life and the people in it. The Sun rising, the smile of your children and later Grandkids, your Grandparents and  Mom and Dad. Try to live a simple life of gratitude and appreciation and be thankful you live in a great nation. I used to play in a band and three of my friends I loved and played music with are gone. I also lost my Sister suddenly, never had a chance to say good bye. I don't mean to bring you down just love your people because you never know.
As Kenny Chesney said , "Don't blink "     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4f0p5KqdU9U&list=PL9rAPk6gePzc48gAgImrHGAk4LSS2cpDJ&index=1
it goes by fast!
« Last Edit: June 09, 2020, 01:23:34 PM by scrap iron »
Mike F.                                                                               "I am what I am and that's all that I am" Popeye the sailor

Offline MattyAHA

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I owned and ran a recording studio for 30 years.  Should be a dream job...writing and recording music for film and video.  It was cool at first.  After 30 years it was just another job I had to go to every day.
This is why I say "No" every time I get asked if I'm going to open my own brewery. Once your hobby becomes your job, it's not a hobby any more.
Amen, i had some family and friends say to me you should work at a brewery or start a brewery and that is always my answer. i don't wanna ruin what i do for peace and relaxation and turn it into a job, like Denny said about the music industry it was cool at first but after awhile just turned into a job. the idea of working in the brewing industry is just a nightmare, at least for me. i brew for the love of it
Matty


"This sweet nectar was my life blood"-  Phil "Landfill" krundle

Offline denny

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I owned and ran a recording studio for 30 years.  Should be a dream job...writing and recording music for film and video.  It was cool at first.  After 30 years it was just another job I had to go to every day.
But the idea that you were your own boss, made your schedule or any of that... worth it or better than working for the man or no?  I never set out to do it.  It just happened that way.  :)

But see, you dont make your own schedule.  I was at the beck and call of my client's schedule.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline denny

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I owned and ran a recording studio for 30 years.  Should be a dream job...writing and recording music for film and video.  It was cool at first.  After 30 years it was just another job I had to go to every day.
This is why I say "No" every time I get asked if I'm going to open my own brewery. Once your hobby becomes your job, it's not a hobby any more.

Same here....nothing kills passion like being forced to do something.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline Visor

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I owned and ran a recording studio for 30 years.  Should be a dream job...writing and recording music for film and video.  It was cool at first.  After 30 years it was just another job I had to go to every day.

   Did you ever work a regular job again after leaving your business? After 9 years of owning a business I don't know how well I'd handle working a regular job, all the "jobs" I've had since have been casual, single job, one off deals. My intent since I left my store has always been to start another business.
I spent most of my money on beer, tools and guns, the rest I foolishly squandered on stupid stuff!

Offline jeffy

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I owned and ran a recording studio for 30 years.  Should be a dream job...writing and recording music for film and video.  It was cool at first.  After 30 years it was just another job I had to go to every day.

   Did you ever work a regular job again after leaving your business? After 9 years of owning a business I don't know how well I'd handle working a regular job, all the "jobs" I've had since have been casual, single job, one off deals. My intent since I left my store has always been to start another business.
I think the lack of stress would make it worth the chance.  I've been my own boss since 1984, but unlike Denny I still have a separate and private life away from the business.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995