Author Topic: Ambient temperature for primary fermenter  (Read 984 times)

Offline jrenmo

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Re: Ambient temperature for primary fermenter
« Reply #30 on: August 06, 2020, 06:47:33 PM »
Started a batch of Brown ale on Monday. Fermentation vigorously started within a couple hours. On day 3 it slowed waaaay down. Temps in my area are considerably cool for this time of year. Morning average low is 57 degrees. I have it fermenting in my bedroom closet. Could it be because of cool temps that yeast have slowed down? First time brewing beer however I’ve been fermenting mead for over 10 years, never had this happen. I guess time will tell if yeast becomes active again.

Offline denny

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Re: Ambient temperature for primary fermenter
« Reply #31 on: August 06, 2020, 06:54:40 PM »
Maybe, or it could just be that fermentation is progressing.  What is the temp of the beer?  That's what matters.
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Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Ambient temperature for primary fermenter
« Reply #32 on: August 07, 2020, 05:31:47 PM »
Maybe, or it could just be that fermentation is progressing.  What is the temp of the beer?  That's what matters.
Right, because even if the ambient temperature is 57 the beer will be higher because of heat generated by fermentation.
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Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: Ambient temperature for primary fermenter
« Reply #33 on: August 07, 2020, 07:17:14 PM »
As Denny mentioned, ambient temperature and internal temperature usually do not match during active fermentation because, to use a big word, fermentation is exothermic. The little yeasty beasties are reducing polysaccharides to monosaccharides and monosaccharides to carbon, which they transform into energy.  That process releases heat.  I remember watching a series of videos on VHS tape that were created by Micheal Jackson (the beer hunter, not the singer) where he was in a fermentation room at a German brewery.  What was interesting to see was that there was frost on the outside of the fermenter, but fermentation activity appeared to be very strong.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2020, 08:45:50 PM by Saccharomyces »