Author Topic: Clouds In My Coffee  (Read 690 times)

Offline Fire Rooster

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Re: Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2020, 04:07:32 PM »
I like Bry-97 because it has a neutral flavor letting the hops and malt shine, it takes a week to ferment my avg 1.056-ish beers which fits my pipeline, it finished the job taking me to the 1.010 neighborhood consistently, and it’s clears very bright.


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I was perhaps too quick to judge this yeast.
It was like a muddy river bottling, but looks like it might be my clearest yet.
An early sampling will be in 1 1/2 weeks.

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #16 on: August 08, 2020, 04:10:53 PM »
I forgot to add: Through expression of a β-glucosidase enzyme, Bry- 97 can promote hop biotransformation and accentuate hop flavor and aroma. I’ve not dabbled there yet but I have plans to.


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Offline Fire Rooster

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Re: Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #17 on: August 08, 2020, 08:40:13 PM »
I forgot to add: Through expression of a β-glucosidase enzyme, Bry- 97 can promote hop biotransformation and accentuate hop flavor and aroma. I’ve not dabbled there yet but I have plans to.


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Whoa, that's a couple of high point scrabble words there.
I'll get back to you on that one.

Offline BrewBama

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Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #18 on: August 08, 2020, 11:39:41 PM »
It’s just a fancy way to say the yeast has an enzyme that can enhance hop flavors if the hops are added to active fermentation.


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« Last Edit: August 09, 2020, 01:17:05 AM by BrewBama »
“From man’s sweat and God’s love, beer came into the world.” — St. Arnold

Brewed in the Tennessee Valley. Rocket City — Huntsville AL

Offline Fire Rooster

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Re: Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #19 on: August 09, 2020, 09:01:17 AM »
It’s just a fancy way to say the yeast has an enzyme that can enhance hop flavors if the hops are added to active fermentation.


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I don't dry hop.  You brought to my attention a procedure I was unaware of, and will do.
It's perfect for my process.  Wort, yeast, (and now hops) tossed in fermenter, not
touched for 3 weeks, pop airlock then bottle.

4.25 gal

7 lbs Vienna
1 lb White Wheat

50 min .5oz Amarillo Pellets (8.5AA)
35 min .5oz
25 min .5 oz
.5oz Tossed in fermenter with wort & yeast.

Will use one of the two yeasts I have on hand, US-05 or S-04.

Thanks

http://brulosophy.com/2017/06/12/dry-hop-at-yeast-pitch-vs-standard-dry-hop-in-neipa-exbeeriment-results/
« Last Edit: August 09, 2020, 10:01:54 AM by Fire Rooster »

Offline BrewBama

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Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #20 on: August 09, 2020, 11:53:31 AM »
Only certain yeasts have a high enough enzyme activity to make the effort worthwhile. 

Fermentis recommends S-04, S-33, and K-97 as good choices but not -05.  https://fermentis.com/en/yeast-to-brew-a-neipa/

Bry-97, Belle Saison, and New England IPA from Lallemand have been reported as good choices also. https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LAL-bestpractices-Biotransformation-digital-1.pdf

Also, there’s a lot of discussion out there of when to pitch hops in fermentation. It’s all over the map.

The general consensus has landed at ~3 days before full attenuation then package the beer quickly under low O2 conditions to preserve the effort. The idea is CO2 generated during fermentation actually scrubs hop flavors from the beer. But pitching later, as activity is subsiding has less scrubbing effect but still gives protection by yeast activity from the O2 uptake potential from opening the fermenter.  Leaving it sit idle in a fermenter after activity is complete is not recommended.

....and, I understand some tasting panels preferred traditional dry hopped beers over those hopped during active fermentation suggesting this technique is not a silver bullet.

Anyway, have fun experimenting!


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« Last Edit: August 09, 2020, 12:52:42 PM by BrewBama »
“From man’s sweat and God’s love, beer came into the world.” — St. Arnold

Brewed in the Tennessee Valley. Rocket City — Huntsville AL

Offline denny

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Re: Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #21 on: August 09, 2020, 01:33:09 PM »
Only certain yeasts have a high enough enzyme activity to make the effort worthwhile. 

Fermentis recommends S-04, S-33, and K-97 as good choices but not -05.  https://fermentis.com/en/yeast-to-brew-a-neipa/

Bry-97, Belle Saison, and New England IPA from Lallemand have been reported as good choices also. https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LAL-bestpractices-Biotransformation-digital-1.pdf

Also, there’s a lot of discussion out there of when to pitch hops in fermentation. It’s all over the map.

The general consensus has landed at ~3 days before full attenuation then package the beer quickly under low O2 conditions to preserve the effort. The idea is CO2 generated during fermentation actually scrubs hop flavors from the beer. But pitching later, as activity is subsiding has less scrubbing effect but still gives protection by yeast activity from the O2 uptake potential from opening the fermenter.  Leaving it sit idle in a fermenter after activity is complete is not recommended.

....and, I understand some tasting panels preferred traditional dry hopped beers over those hopped during active fermentation suggesting this technique is not a silver bullet.

Anyway, have fun experimenting!


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After discussing the 48 hour cold dry hop ,method on the podcast, we heard from commercial breweries who have done to that for their NEIPA.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline Fire Rooster

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Re: Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #22 on: August 09, 2020, 01:42:29 PM »
Only certain yeasts have a high enough enzyme activity to make the effort worthwhile. 

Fermentis recommends S-04, S-33, and K-97 as good choices but not -05.  https://fermentis.com/en/yeast-to-brew-a-neipa/

Bry-97, Belle Saison, and New England IPA from Lallemand have been reported as good choices also. https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LAL-bestpractices-Biotransformation-digital-1.pdf

Also, there’s a lot of discussion out there of when to pitch hops in fermentation. It’s all over the map.

The general consensus has landed at ~3 days before full attenuation then package the beer quickly under low O2 conditions to preserve the effort. The idea is CO2 generated during fermentation actually scrubs hop flavors from the beer. But pitching later, as activity is subsiding has less scrubbing effect but still gives protection by yeast activity from the O2 uptake potential from opening the fermenter.  Leaving it sit idle in a fermenter after activity is complete is not recommended.

....and, I understand some tasting panels preferred traditional dry hopped beers over those hopped during active fermentation suggesting this technique is not a silver bullet.

Anyway, have fun experimenting!


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Thanks !, S-04 it is.
Tossing .5 oz at the beginning of fermentation, and taste for myself
what goes on.  Thanks for the tips.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2020, 02:18:49 PM by Fire Rooster »

Offline erockrph

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Re: Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #23 on: August 09, 2020, 02:24:46 PM »
Only certain yeasts have a high enough enzyme activity to make the effort worthwhile. 

Fermentis recommends S-04, S-33, and K-97 as good choices but not -05.  https://fermentis.com/en/yeast-to-brew-a-neipa/

Bry-97, Belle Saison, and New England IPA from Lallemand have been reported as good choices also. https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LAL-bestpractices-Biotransformation-digital-1.pdf

Also, there’s a lot of discussion out there of when to pitch hops in fermentation. It’s all over the map.

The general consensus has landed at ~3 days before full attenuation then package the beer quickly under low O2 conditions to preserve the effort. The idea is CO2 generated during fermentation actually scrubs hop flavors from the beer. But pitching later, as activity is subsiding has less scrubbing effect but still gives protection by yeast activity from the O2 uptake potential from opening the fermenter.  Leaving it sit idle in a fermenter after activity is complete is not recommended.

....and, I understand some tasting panels preferred traditional dry hopped beers over those hopped during active fermentation suggesting this technique is not a silver bullet.

Anyway, have fun experimenting!


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I haven't tried it yet, but Lallemand reports that their Köln yeast is also capable of performing hop biotransformation as well:

https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/united-states/product-details/lalbrew-koln-kolsch-style-ale-yeast/
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Offline Fire Rooster

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Re: Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #24 on: August 13, 2020, 01:13:45 PM »
Only certain yeasts have a high enough enzyme activity to make the effort worthwhile. 

Fermentis recommends S-04, S-33, and K-97 as good choices but not -05.  https://fermentis.com/en/yeast-to-brew-a-neipa/

Bry-97, Belle Saison, and New England IPA from Lallemand have been reported as good choices also. https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LAL-bestpractices-Biotransformation-digital-1.pdf

Also, there’s a lot of discussion out there of when to pitch hops in fermentation. It’s all over the map.

The general consensus has landed at ~3 days before full attenuation then package the beer quickly under low O2 conditions to preserve the effort. The idea is CO2 generated during fermentation actually scrubs hop flavors from the beer. But pitching later, as activity is subsiding has less scrubbing effect but still gives protection by yeast activity from the O2 uptake potential from opening the fermenter.  Leaving it sit idle in a fermenter after activity is complete is not recommended.

....and, I understand some tasting panels preferred traditional dry hopped beers over those hopped during active fermentation suggesting this technique is not a silver bullet.

Anyway, have fun experimenting!


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I haven't tried it yet, but Lallemand reports that their Köln yeast is also capable of performing hop biotransformation as well:

https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/united-states/product-details/lalbrew-koln-kolsch-style-ale-yeast/

Thanks, will give it a try sometime this fall/winter.
Added to my brew-cue.

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #25 on: August 13, 2020, 02:22:03 PM »

I haven't tried it yet, but Lallemand reports that their Köln yeast is also capable of performing hop biotransformation as well:

https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/united-states/product-details/lalbrew-koln-kolsch-style-ale-yeast/

I remember that now. Makes sense given K-97 has the gene.


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Offline Fire Rooster

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Re: Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #26 on: August 13, 2020, 08:48:09 PM »
First taste using BRY-97 yeast, Simcoe & Amarillo hops.
It's still hazy, not concerned. However the passion fruit
taste is overpowering, from the Simcoe ? I could do without.  It's a very
good beer (nice change, not great), but not what I'm looking for in a beer.

.5 oz Centennial-Pellets @60min, 1 oz Amarillo-Pellets @ 10min, and 1 oz Simcoe-Pellets @ 5min.
Hop spider removed after boil. Simcoe seems to overpower the malt, perhaps 1 oz was too much for a 4.25 gallon batch.
Satisfied for getting the hop flavor, have to figure out which one I like, and back it off a bit.

It tastes as if I'm biting into a passion fruit, I'll call it Passion Ale.
It may be the yeast making the hops very pronounced.
Magnum and Nugget are up next, never tried those.
Galena is on my list to try also, for futures batches.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2020, 08:36:03 PM by Fire Rooster »

Offline Fire Rooster

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Re: Clouds In My Coffee
« Reply #27 on: August 13, 2020, 09:21:15 PM »
Only certain yeasts have a high enough enzyme activity to make the effort worthwhile. 

Fermentis recommends S-04, S-33, and K-97 as good choices but not -05.  https://fermentis.com/en/yeast-to-brew-a-neipa/

Bry-97, Belle Saison, and New England IPA from Lallemand have been reported as good choices also. https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/LAL-bestpractices-Biotransformation-digital-1.pdf

Also, there’s a lot of discussion out there of when to pitch hops in fermentation. It’s all over the map.

The general consensus has landed at ~3 days before full attenuation then package the beer quickly under low O2 conditions to preserve the effort. The idea is CO2 generated during fermentation actually scrubs hop flavors from the beer. But pitching later, as activity is subsiding has less scrubbing effect but still gives protection by yeast activity from the O2 uptake potential from opening the fermenter.  Leaving it sit idle in a fermenter after activity is complete is not recommended.

....and, I understand some tasting panels preferred traditional dry hopped beers over those hopped during active fermentation suggesting this technique is not a silver bullet.

Anyway, have fun experimenting!


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I haven't tried it yet, but Lallemand reports that their Köln yeast is also capable of performing hop biotransformation as well:

https://www.lallemandbrewing.com/en/united-states/product-details/lalbrew-koln-kolsch-style-ale-yeast/

Their pitching rate calculator is two packets for 4.25 gal, 4.5% ABV