Author Topic: Efficiency test  (Read 483 times)

Offline Megary

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Re: Efficiency test
« Reply #15 on: July 31, 2020, 07:19:04 PM »
I prefer to do my calculations by hand based on the formulae in How to Brew.  I think it helps to understand my process, besides it doesn't take very long to calculate Strike water, OG, FG...etc.  And it keeps the brain cells from dropping out of suspension.
I'll only use a calculator for water chemistry because...chemistry.  :-\

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Efficiency test
« Reply #16 on: July 31, 2020, 09:57:01 PM »
I use BeerSmith get into the ballpark. Same with Bru’n Water. I fine tune from there.

It’s nice to have an equipment setup that I can quickly plug in fermentables to get a confident prediction of the outcome.


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I do the same here.  No offense Sacchromyces, as I can do all of the hand calculations as well.  However, BeerSmith will get me in the ballpark and that is what I am shooting for.  I normally hit my OG within a couple percent and that is good enough for me.  Plus it is less time getting the recipe designed and brewed.  I wonder what the comments are regarding Brewer's Friend?

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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Efficiency test
« Reply #17 on: July 31, 2020, 10:00:41 PM »
Sometimes I just say, 10 lbs for a 1.050 beer. Other times I use a spreadsheet to design the recipe.

I did a bitter with Chevallier malt. Was low a couple of points, I think because of the old variety.
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Offline spurviance

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Re: Efficiency test
« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2020, 02:56:02 PM »
It's always entertaining to see a thread take on a life of it's own and witness varying opinions on a subject.  At least things remain civil on this forum, unlike other platforms, as we are only talking about beer.
After disassembling my new barley crusher I discovered the root of my problem.  The passive roller was up against the o-ring of the active roller, making it difficult for the passive roller to turn and help pull the grain thru.  I adjusted this, and milled my 11.5 lbs of grain and was happy with the crush.
I ended up brewing 5.5 gallons of a Marzen with an OG of 1.057.  75% efficiency for my BIAB method which I was pleased with.  Hopefully my next couple brews will be in the same efficiency range so I can proceed with confidence when creating future recipes...
Thanks for the input and entertainment.
Scott
On tap,  Vienna Lager, Doppelbock, Dortmunder Export, Pale Ale, Porter, Saison

Fermenting, Saison

Offline KellerBrauer

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Re: Efficiency test
« Reply #19 on: August 01, 2020, 04:51:19 PM »
It's always entertaining to see a thread take on a life of it's own and witness varying opinions on a subject.  At least things remain civil on this forum, unlike other platforms, as we are only talking about beer.
After disassembling my new barley crusher I discovered the root of my problem.  The passive roller was up against the o-ring of the active roller, making it difficult for the passive roller to turn and help pull the grain thru.  I adjusted this, and milled my 11.5 lbs of grain and was happy with the crush.
I ended up brewing 5.5 gallons of a Marzen with an OG of 1.057.  75% efficiency for my BIAB method which I was pleased with.  Hopefully my next couple brews will be in the same efficiency range so I can proceed with confidence when creating future recipes...
Thanks for the input and entertainment.
Scott

Actually, the manufacturers directions tell us that the “O”-Ring is only in place for shipping and will eventually break and fall out.  So, it’s actually not necessary. Mine stayed in place for about 3 uses, then it was gone.
Joliet, IL

All good things come to those who show patients and perseverance while maintaining a positive and progressive attitude. 😉

Offline spurviance

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Re: Efficiency test
« Reply #20 on: August 01, 2020, 07:18:10 PM »
It's always entertaining to see a thread take on a life of it's own and witness varying opinions on a subject.  At least things remain civil on this forum, unlike other platforms, as we are only talking about beer.
After disassembling my new barley crusher I discovered the root of my problem.  The passive roller was up against the o-ring of the active roller, making it difficult for the passive roller to turn and help pull the grain thru.  I adjusted this, and milled my 11.5 lbs of grain and was happy with the crush.
I ended up brewing 5.5 gallons of a Marzen with an OG of 1.057.  75% efficiency for my BIAB method which I was pleased with.  Hopefully my next couple brews will be in the same efficiency range so I can proceed with confidence when creating future recipes...
Thanks for the input and entertainment.
Scott

Actually, the manufacturers directions tell us that the “O”-Ring is only in place for shipping and will eventually break and fall out.  So, it’s actually not necessary. Mine stayed in place for about 3 uses, then it was gone.

Good to know.  Wish mine had broken off sooner
On tap,  Vienna Lager, Doppelbock, Dortmunder Export, Pale Ale, Porter, Saison

Fermenting, Saison

Offline KellerBrauer

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Re: Efficiency test
« Reply #21 on: August 02, 2020, 12:22:47 PM »
It's always entertaining to see a thread take on a life of it's own and witness varying opinions on a subject.  At least things remain civil on this forum, unlike other platforms, as we are only talking about beer.
After disassembling my new barley crusher I discovered the root of my problem.  The passive roller was up against the o-ring of the active roller, making it difficult for the passive roller to turn and help pull the grain thru.  I adjusted this, and milled my 11.5 lbs of grain and was happy with the crush.
I ended up brewing 5.5 gallons of a Marzen with an OG of 1.057.  75% efficiency for my BIAB method which I was pleased with.  Hopefully my next couple brews will be in the same efficiency range so I can proceed with confidence when creating future recipes...
Thanks for the input and entertainment.
Scott

Actually, the manufacturers directions tell us that the “O”-Ring is only in place for shipping and will eventually break and fall out.  So, it’s actually not necessary. Mine stayed in place for about 3 uses, then it was gone.

Good to know.  Wish mine had broken off sooner

👍🏽
Joliet, IL

All good things come to those who show patients and perseverance while maintaining a positive and progressive attitude. 😉

Offline Big Monk

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Re: Efficiency test
« Reply #22 on: August 04, 2020, 01:23:13 PM »
I’m 3 batches in with a new grain mill and have had to make some adjustments.   My efficiencies with this mill have been all over the place.   I’m thinking of taking 1 lb. of 2-row and doing a test mash to see what type of extraction efficiency I get.   I’m curious if anyone has experience doing this and if I can expect similar efficiency when I scale it up to my normal 10-15 lb. batches.....

One thing you could do is use your refractometer to take readings during the mash at intervals and record the extract you are getting. Then compare the first wort extract you are estimating to what you are getting. Keep in mind that first wort extract is the number that is going to tell you where you are at WRT the variables like crush, etc.

You may find that your conversion/extraction efficiency is lower or higher than you expected and adjust accordingly. This will help dial in the ideal crush for your system.
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