Author Topic: Lallemand Windsor British  (Read 364 times)

Online Megary

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Lallemand Windsor British
« on: July 20, 2020, 10:38:30 PM »
I just used this yeast for the first time in a Porter.
Mashed at 150.  Hit all pertinent numbers.  1.062 OG, 3 gallons into fermenter, one 11g packet added to wort while racking.  Pitched in the mid 70’s and cooled to 67-68 for fermentation. 

The yeast took off like it had somewhere to get to.  Activity in 2-3 hours, krausen in about 7, still chugging away mightily at about 18.  By 30 hours, airlock activity is essentially over.  Obviously it’s still quietly doing its thing, but I’m curious if this is Windsor’s MO. I’m aware that it leaves behind some sugars (maltotriose, if I remember).  I intended to let it ferment for about 2 weeks, but starting to wonder if 1 will be enough time for it to clean up.

Anyone with experience with this yeast?

Thanks in advance.

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Lallemand Windsor British
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2020, 02:11:37 AM »
Very normal.  Should be totally done fermenting within 36-40 hours.  No need to keep it in the fermenter much longer than that, definitely not 2 weeks.  It's a good clean yeast, doesn't need time to clean up after itself.  Your FG should be about 1.024 plus or minus a point.

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Offline Andy Farke

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Re: Lallemand Windsor British
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2020, 05:14:38 AM »
I recently brewed with Windsor, and had a similarly vigorous fermentation. It moves fast! That said, even though I kept temperatures down (66), I didn't care for the esters alongside the citrusy/tropical hops I used--definitely a bit of a clash. You're almost certainly OK with a porter, but any IPA/pale ale should tread carefully in hop choice.
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Online Megary

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Re: Lallemand Windsor British
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2020, 08:42:23 PM »
Very normal.  Should be totally done fermenting within 36-40 hours.  No need to keep it in the fermenter much longer than that, definitely not 2 weeks.  It's a good clean yeast, doesn't need time to clean up after itself.  Your FG should be about 1.024 plus or minus a point.

Enjoy.

1.025 after 8 days. Sample tasted just as it should.

Good call.

Online Saccharomyces

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Re: Lallemand Windsor British
« Reply #4 on: August 02, 2020, 04:00:00 PM »
If you like the ester profile of Windsor, but desire a higher attenuation rate, try pitching Nottingham with Windsor.

Online Megary

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Re: Lallemand Windsor British
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2020, 05:28:01 PM »
Interesting. 

One question, to anyone:
I put 3 gallons into the fermenter.  I’ve been under the impression that pitching 1 full pack of dried yeast is fine, but always some varying level of an over-pitch.  If I mix yeasts, I have to assume that pitching 2 packs would be either a waste or just flat out poor form.  So if I split each pack in half, how does one best store an open pack of dried yeast?  In the freezer?  And for how long will it remain viable?  I have to think that the date on the pack would no longer hold any relevance.

Thanks in advance.

Offline erockrph

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Re: Lallemand Windsor British
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2020, 08:43:36 PM »
When I co-pitch Windsor with Notty, I use about 1/2 pack of each in a 3 gallon batch. I usually save the remainder, and I've used it maybe 6 months later without issues. I'd be willing to bet you could go longer too.

And refrigerated dry yeast generally lasts several years past its exp date in my experience.

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Offline tommymorris

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Re: Lallemand Windsor British
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2020, 08:48:20 PM »
You might put both packs in a vacuum bag, seal them, and then refrigerate as usual. I think that would keep them protected from contamination.

Offline BrewBama

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Lallemand Windsor British
« Reply #8 on: August 03, 2020, 02:33:22 AM »
You might put both packs in a vacuum bag, seal them, and then refrigerate as usual. I think that would keep them protected from contamination.
+1.  Lallemand states that if kept re-sealed under vacuum and stored under appropriate conditions (dry & below 4 ̊C (39 ̊F)), dry yeast can be used until the indicated expiration date, which is typically 2-3 years after manufacture.


And refrigerated dry yeast generally lasts several years past its exp date in my experience.


I agree but the mfr won’t say that.

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« Last Edit: August 03, 2020, 02:35:34 AM by BrewBama »
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Offline tommymorris

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Re: Lallemand Windsor British
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2020, 03:40:28 AM »
If you like the ester profile of Windsor, but desire a higher attenuation rate, try pitching Nottingham with Windsor.
Can the slurry of this mix be reused with the same effect or will one strain live on while one dies out?

Online Saccharomyces

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Re: Lallemand Windsor British
« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2020, 04:09:16 AM »
Can the slurry of this mix be reused with the same effect or will one strain live on while one dies out?

It is hard to say how long they will co-exist, but the mixture should be good for at least a couple of repitches.   That would be a good experiment to conduct.  We have to remember that all pure cultures were once part of a mixed culture.  A lot of British cultures that are still in use today are mixed cultures.

Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Lallemand Windsor British
« Reply #11 on: August 03, 2020, 05:01:24 PM »
And refrigerated dry yeast generally lasts several years past its exp date in my experience.
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