Author Topic: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt  (Read 647 times)

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2020, 11:49:28 PM »
If you called, they may have just read off of a list on the call tree, that has not been updated.
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Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #16 on: August 09, 2020, 05:59:31 PM »
I have always obtained very good results with Rahr base malt.  Granted, it was 2-row, not 6-row, but the beer produced was always very drinkable.

By the way, I prefer to make Pre-Prohibition lager with 2-row Harrington or Klages.  There is no arguing that 6-row is traditional and that the addition of corn was to lower the overall protein level to that of European barley; thereby, making the final product more stable.  It is just that I have made it with 2-row and 6-row and found that most of my friends and family prefer the 2-row version.    Pre-Pro lager is to German and Czech lager, what Italian-American cooking is to Italian cooking (trust me, I grew up in an Italian-American family and I lived in Italy for a year and half when I was younger); namely, an adaption of technique to readily available ingredients.  I believe that the more important ingredients are the hop bill.  Back then, they only couple of varieties of hop from which to chose.  Cluster evolved in the Hudson River valley as one or more crosses between hops brought by the Dutch and wild cultivars.  However, Fuggle was used to a large extent as well (noble hops have never yielded well in the United States due our shorter photo period).  I do not know how many people know it, but Anheuser-Bush sponsored the development of Willamette as a better yielding replacement for Fuggle.


Offline tommymorris

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #17 on: August 09, 2020, 06:10:10 PM »
I have always obtained very good results with Rahr base malt.  Granted, it was 2-row, not 6-row, but the beer produced was always very drinkable.

By the way, I prefer to make Pre-Prohibition lager with 2-row Harrington or Klages.  There is no arguing that 6-row is traditional and that the addition of corn was to lower the overall protein level to that of European barley; thereby, making the final product more stable.  It is just that I have made it with 2-row and 6-row and found that most of my friends and family prefer the 2-row version.    Pre-Pro lager is to German and Czech lager, what Italian-American cooking is to Italian cooking (trust me, I grew up in an Italian-American family and I lived in Italy for a year and half when I was younger); namely, an adaption of technique to readily available ingredients.  I believe that the more important ingredients are the hop bill.  Back then, they only couple of varieties of hop from which to chose.  Cluster evolved in the Hudson River valley as one or more crosses between hops brought by the Dutch and wild cultivars.  However, Fuggle was used to a large extent as well (noble hops have never yielded well in the United States due our shorter photo period).  I do not know how many people know it, but Anheuser-Bush sponsored the development of Willamette as a better yielding replacement for Fuggle.
I have never used 6-row so decided to try for it myself.

I definitely like my 2-row version. From what I have read you are your friend’s preference for 2-row over 6-row is quite common. But, I imagine worst case a 6-row variant will still be quite drinkable in the Alabama summer even if it is not quite as good.

Regarding hops, I have been using US Saaz. It may not have been popular pre-prohibition (I don’t know) but it certainly tastes good. I am not a big fan of Clusters or Fuggles.

Offline denny

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #18 on: August 09, 2020, 06:51:19 PM »
Are Harrington and Klages still grown?
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #19 on: August 09, 2020, 09:08:40 PM »
In a CAP I like the 6-row husks making for a nice run off.

Today many of the new 2-row varieties have a DP at or higher than 6-row when I started using it. Way back 6-row was 160 Lintner. Briess Full Pint is 150 Lintner. Mecca Grade Metolious Full Pint is 170 Lintner.

Most 2-Row pale will work great in a CAP with <25% adjuncts.
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Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #20 on: August 10, 2020, 12:41:33 AM »
Are Harrington and Klages still grown?

I have not seen a reference to Klages since the nineties, but it was very popular when I started to brew.  I still see references to Harrington being used in craft brewing, so it must be still available on a least a limited basis.  What made Harrington so popular was how quickly it modified, which improved malt house throughput.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2020, 12:44:43 AM by Saccharomyces »

Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #21 on: August 10, 2020, 12:48:16 AM »
Way back 6-row was 160 Lintner.

That is what I remember as well with American 2-row being 120 Lintner.  That is still more than enough to convert at least 30% non-malted cereal grain.  However, I only 20% corn in my Pre-Pro Pils, either corn grits with a cereal mash in addition to a main mash ending in a combined mash or flaked maize with a single infusion mash.

Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #22 on: August 10, 2020, 12:53:50 AM »
Regarding hops, I have been using US Saaz. It may not have been popular pre-prohibition (I don’t know) but it certainly tastes good. I am not a big fan of Clusters or Fuggles.

I am fan of Cluster. Denny and Drew posted my Anglo-American Bitter on the Experimental Brewing site a few years ago. Used correctly, Cluster is a lot like Galena in that it is pretty neutral as a bittering hop.   It is also one the most stable bittering hops one can buy.

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #23 on: August 10, 2020, 01:26:35 AM »
Regarding hops, I have been using US Saaz. It may not have been popular pre-prohibition (I don’t know) but it certainly tastes good. I am not a big fan of Clusters or Fuggles.

I am fan of Cluster. Denny and Drew posted my Anglo-American Bitter on the Experimental Brewing site a few years ago. Used correctly, Cluster is a lot like Galena in that it is pretty neutral as a bittering hop.   It is also one the most stable bittering hops one can buy.

The first time I had Jeff Renter's "Your Father's Mustache" at our club meeting, I had to tell him that the flavor was what I remembered from stolen sips of beer from Dad and Grampa. He smiled, and said "Cluster hops".

I use Cluster early, then Saaz, or Mittelfrüh, or an American derivative late. Cluster is just part of it, for me.
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #24 on: August 10, 2020, 01:35:40 PM »
... Cluster is just part of it, for me.

+1. Some things just can’t be substituted.


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Offline Cliffs

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #25 on: August 10, 2020, 10:04:16 PM »
Regarding hops, I have been using US Saaz. It may not have been popular pre-prohibition (I don’t know) but it certainly tastes good. I am not a big fan of Clusters or Fuggles.

I am fan of Cluster. Denny and Drew posted my Anglo-American Bitter on the Experimental Brewing site a few years ago. Used correctly, Cluster is a lot like Galena in that it is pretty neutral as a bittering hop.   It is also one the most stable bittering hops one can buy.

I heard a while back that there are many cluster hops out there, early harvest, mid harvest and late harvest cluster, as well as Ivanhoe cluster. What was told to me is that Cluster was a name for almost ANY hop that was grown commercially in North America, and that there might be many different and unique "Cluster" hops out there.

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #26 on: August 11, 2020, 02:29:04 AM »
Regarding hops, I have been using US Saaz. It may not have been popular pre-prohibition (I don’t know) but it certainly tastes good. I am not a big fan of Clusters or Fuggles.

I am fan of Cluster. Denny and Drew posted my Anglo-American Bitter on the Experimental Brewing site a few years ago. Used correctly, Cluster is a lot like Galena in that it is pretty neutral as a bittering hop.   It is also one the most stable bittering hops one can buy.

I heard a while back that there are many cluster hops out there, early harvest, mid harvest and late harvest cluster, as well as Ivanhoe cluster. What was told to me is that Cluster was a name for almost ANY hop that was grown commercially in North America, and that there might be many different and unique "Cluster" hops out there.

Just like EKG and "Hallertau".
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Offline Cliffs

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #27 on: August 11, 2020, 02:25:51 PM »
Regarding hops, I have been using US Saaz. It may not have been popular pre-prohibition (I don’t know) but it certainly tastes good. I am not a big fan of Clusters or Fuggles.

I am fan of Cluster. Denny and Drew posted my Anglo-American Bitter on the Experimental Brewing site a few years ago. Used correctly, Cluster is a lot like Galena in that it is pretty neutral as a bittering hop.   It is also one the most stable bittering hops one can buy.

I heard a while back that there are many cluster hops out there, early harvest, mid harvest and late harvest cluster, as well as Ivanhoe cluster. What was told to me is that Cluster was a name for almost ANY hop that was grown commercially in North America, and that there might be many different and unique "Cluster" hops out there.

Just like EKG and "Hallertau".

can you elaborate?

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #28 on: August 11, 2020, 03:09:04 PM »
From Ron Pattinson you can learn that EKG is a catch-all for whatever they are growing in Kent. Usually there is Holding in the name.

Hallertau? You can buy Hallertau hops. Those are whatever from the Hallertau Region, often Hallertau Gold. Always look for the region and variety. Hallertau Mittelfrüh, Hallertau Perle, Hallertau Tradion, and so on.

Edit, I've had good results with whole Cluster from Hops Direct.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2020, 03:10:35 PM by hopfenundmalz »
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Offline Cliffs

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Re: Briess 6-row Brewers Malt
« Reply #29 on: August 11, 2020, 05:33:33 PM »
From Ron Pattinson you can learn that EKG is a catch-all for whatever they are growing in Kent. Usually there is Holding in the name.

Hallertau? You can buy Hallertau hops. Those are whatever from the Hallertau Region, often Hallertau Gold. Always look for the region and variety. Hallertau Mittelfrüh, Hallertau Perle, Hallertau Tradion, and so on.

Edit, I've had good results with whole Cluster from Hops Direct.

ahhh got it