Author Topic: why is there no yeast in the recipe?  (Read 1552 times)

Offline lobotmagic

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why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« on: September 10, 2020, 09:17:29 am »
Hi everybody,
this is going to be a totally stupid question for most of you... I'm a new brewer and I'm looking at a recipe for some IPA that I'd like to make, and there's no Yeast in the recipe- What am I supposed to do?

Offline Bob357

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2020, 09:30:01 am »
If you post the recipe, or a link to it, it makes it much easier to recommend a yeast strain. There are many different strains that can be appropriate for IPAs.
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Offline lobotmagic

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2020, 10:38:58 am »
here is the recipe below-
Good Word Brewing Never Sleep New England IPA | American IPA

INGREDIENTS
For 5 gal (18.9 L)
6.4 lb (2.90 kg) Pilsner malt
3.25 lb (1.47 kg) English Pale malt
1.5 lb (0.68 kg) of Oat malt
14 oz (0.40 kg)Dextrose
1 oz (28 g) of Vic Secret hops (10 min)
1.5 oz (42 g) Vic Secret hops (5 min)
1.5 oz (42 g) Citra hops (5 min)
5 oz (142 g) Citra hops (whirlpool)
5 oz (142 g) Vic Secret hops (whirlpool)
8 oz (227 g) Vic Secret hops (dry hop)
8 oz (227 g) Citra hops (dry hop)
SPECIFICATIONS
Original Gravity: 1.065 (15.9 P)
Final Gravity: 1.013 (3.2 P)
ABV: 7%
IBU: 45
SRM: 3.8
DIRECTIONS
Stepped mash: 146° F for 15 minutes; 156° F for 30 minutes; mash out at 168° F for 10-15 minutes. 90 minute boil, following schedule listed in the ingredients. After boil, add whirlpool hops once wort is below 180° F to prevent isomerization of hops. Ferment at 68° F for 2 days and increase temperature by 2° F on day 3. Allow temperature to free rise to 72-73° F by day 5. Dry hop for 3 days when final gravity is within 0.5-1 Plato. Complete a diacetyl rest before cold crashing. Do this by taking a 2-4 oz sample that can be capped. Place sample in 140° F water for 20 minutes. Allow sample to come down to room temperature and test for diacetyl by smell and taste. If still present wait another 24-48 hours and retest. Only cold crash after the sample has passed the test. Crash at 32° F for 4-6 days and transfer to package.

Offline denny

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2020, 11:13:18 am »
If you want to go liquid, Wyeast 1318 is used a lot for NEIPA.
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Offline Bob357

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2020, 11:31:07 am »
If you prefer dry yeast, Lalbrew East Coast Ale is a good choice.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2020, 11:32:49 am »
And S-04, S-33, and Lallemand London ESB are also great choices for this recipe.

There's an enormously deep rabbit hole you can fall into here if you are interested:

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/threads/isolated-yeast-tree-house-how-to-identify-and-characterize.623221/

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Offline Kevin

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2020, 04:44:02 pm »
A word of caution... New England IPA can be difficult for many pro brewers let alone someone just starting out. If you are new to homebrewing I would suggest starting with something much simpler.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2020, 04:54:45 pm »
Ooh... I forgot to mention..... with 16 oz dry hops, there's going to be almost zero ounces of beer left to drink!  Holy moly!
Dave

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Offline denny

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2020, 07:56:18 am »
Ooh... I forgot to mention..... with 16 oz dry hops, there's going to be almost zero ounces of beer left to drink!  Holy moly!

Not to mention it far exceeds what I call the "Shellhammer limit" and could be less effective than using fewer hops.
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Offline EnkAMania

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2020, 09:51:33 am »
I went and looked at the recipe and it does indeed say 16 ounces of dry hop.  Even if you halved that, it is more than plenty.  Maybe contact the brewery and ask if that is correct. 

https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/homebrew-recipe/good-word-brewing-never-sleep-new-england-ipa/
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narvin

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2020, 10:03:30 am »
To be fair, Shellhammer hasn't conducted this experiment on a New England IPA as far as I know.  Although your recipe doesn't show it, you would generally add your dry hops well before fermentation is complete.  This could be anywhere from high krausen to 8-10 points from final gravity, but definitely when you still see active fermentation.  The theory is that there are biotransformations of hop compounds into other fruity aromatics that occur when using specific yeasts.  However, on a practical level you're also losing some of the VOCs to CO2 scrubbing.

16 oz in dry hop per 5 gallons is a ton of hops, but I use 8oz regularly in this style.

Offline denny

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2020, 11:28:53 am »
To be fair, Shellhammer hasn't conducted this experiment on a New England IPA as far as I know.  Although your recipe doesn't show it, you would generally add your dry hops well before fermentation is complete.  This could be anywhere from high krausen to 8-10 points from final gravity, but definitely when you still see active fermentation.  The theory is that there are biotransformations of hop compounds into other fruity aromatics that occur when using specific yeasts.  However, on a practical level you're also losing some of the VOCs to CO2 scrubbing.

16 oz in dry hop per 5 gallons is a ton of hops, but I use 8oz regularly in this style.

I would think his research would apply especially to NEIPA.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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narvin

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2020, 11:35:58 am »
To be fair, Shellhammer hasn't conducted this experiment on a New England IPA as far as I know.  Although your recipe doesn't show it, you would generally add your dry hops well before fermentation is complete.  This could be anywhere from high krausen to 8-10 points from final gravity, but definitely when you still see active fermentation.  The theory is that there are biotransformations of hop compounds into other fruity aromatics that occur when using specific yeasts.  However, on a practical level you're also losing some of the VOCs to CO2 scrubbing.

16 oz in dry hop per 5 gallons is a ton of hops, but I use 8oz regularly in this style.

I would think his research would apply especially to NEIPA.

How so?  I'm not discounting it; however, it seems to me that adding hops after primary fermentation is a different scenario than adding them while it is ongoing.

Offline denny

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2020, 11:40:30 am »
To be fair, Shellhammer hasn't conducted this experiment on a New England IPA as far as I know.  Although your recipe doesn't show it, you would generally add your dry hops well before fermentation is complete.  This could be anywhere from high krausen to 8-10 points from final gravity, but definitely when you still see active fermentation.  The theory is that there are biotransformations of hop compounds into other fruity aromatics that occur when using specific yeasts.  However, on a practical level you're also losing some of the VOCs to CO2 scrubbing.

16 oz in dry hop per 5 gallons is a ton of hops, but I use 8oz regularly in this style.

I would think his research would apply especially to NEIPA.

How so?  I'm not discounting it; however, it seems to me that adding hops after primary fermentation is a different scenario than adding6 them while it is ongoing.

True, you still get the tannic load from the hops.  The other theory is that the more mass you have, the more readily it will rebsorbn the oils the hops release.  That's also the theory behind a short dry hop time.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

narvin

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Re: why is there no yeast in the recipe?
« Reply #14 on: September 11, 2020, 12:10:30 pm »
To be fair, Shellhammer hasn't conducted this experiment on a New England IPA as far as I know.  Although your recipe doesn't show it, you would generally add your dry hops well before fermentation is complete.  This could be anywhere from high krausen to 8-10 points from final gravity, but definitely when you still see active fermentation.  The theory is that there are biotransformations of hop compounds into other fruity aromatics that occur when using specific yeasts.  However, on a practical level you're also losing some of the VOCs to CO2 scrubbing.

16 oz in dry hop per 5 gallons is a ton of hops, but I use 8oz regularly in this style.

I would think his research would apply especially to NEIPA.

How so?  I'm not discounting it; however, it seems to me that adding hops after primary fermentation is a different scenario than adding6 them while it is ongoing.

True, you still get the tannic load from the hops.  The other theory is that the more mass you have, the more readily it will rebsorbn the oils the hops release.  That's also the theory behind a short dry hop time.

I haven't done a true side by side either.  I have a beer about to be tapped with a similar recipe and 8oz/5 gal dry hop, which is up from 6 and 7 oz last time, so I can at least give an impression later today.