Author Topic: Harvest  (Read 247 times)

Offline pete b

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Harvest
« on: September 27, 2020, 05:31:33 PM »
About 2/3 of our chili peppers are ripe so its time to make my yearly batch of wood fermented hot sauce.

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« Last Edit: September 27, 2020, 05:35:25 PM by pete b »
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Offline Fire Rooster

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Re: Harvest
« Reply #1 on: September 27, 2020, 06:39:57 PM »
About 2/3 of our chili peppers are ripe so its time to make my yearly batch of wood fermented hot sauce.

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Cool, are those small red ones Candlelight peppers ?

Offline pete b

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Re: Harvest
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2020, 11:11:06 PM »
The small thin ones are Thai dragons. The round ones I can’t remember, we grow them every year but it seems as though the name of the available cultivars changes each year and I  don’t remember what they are called now.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2020, 11:37:07 PM by pete b »
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Harvest
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2020, 11:42:55 PM »
Nice! I grow my chilis in containers on my deck and had a great crop this year. I also invested in a dehydrator so I was able to get them all dry before they rotted this year.

This year I added Guajillo and Pasilla peppers to the chili garden, and I'm looking forward to making a batch of mole later this fall.

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Offline pete b

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Re: Harvest
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2020, 12:29:10 AM »
We mostly grow the chili peppers in containers too. They do remarkably well. We will dehydrate some but the lion’s share will go into the fermented hot sauce.
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Offline HopDen

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Re: Harvest
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2020, 10:08:52 AM »
About 2/3 of our chili peppers are ripe so its time to make my yearly batch of wood fermented hot sauce.

Sent from my SM-G960U1 using Tapatalk

Cool, are those small red ones Candlelight peppers ?

Nice! I assume you are fermenting in some sort of wood vessel? If so, what type of wood? That is intriguing.

I lacto-ferment in glass for 3 weeks with airlocks. Habanero, mango, pineapple, sweet onion, sweet peppers and carrots. All from the garden except mango&pineapple.

Offline pete b

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Re: Harvest
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2020, 05:09:59 PM »
I put toasted wood chips wrapped in cheesecloth into the fermentation vessel. I just use ths peppers and garlic from the garden, water, and salt.
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Offline pete b

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Re: Harvest
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2020, 01:30:51 AM »
I should say I actually meant others to post their own harvests on this thread.
This year's garlic curing.

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Offline Fire Rooster

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Re: Harvest
« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2020, 09:22:39 AM »
I usually do, this year no pics were taken.
Didn't plant much this year only tomatoes, summer squash, black oil sunflower.
I use the small green tomatoes and pickle them.  Cut them in quarters, then
put them in fridge.  50% apple cider vinegar, 50% water, little salt, garlic, red pepper flakes.
Use to get crazy making brine, now I just make it up.  Bushy small peppers do great in containers
on the patio, and look good.  Wife used containers this year to help along some small trees that
just popped up, and have no idea what they are.  There about a foot now and need to figure
out where to plant them mid-late fall.

Designed and built a garden hoop house which you can walk in, to keep the critters out.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2020, 09:35:10 AM by Fire Rooster »

Offline pete b

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Re: Harvest
« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2020, 11:30:42 AM »
I usually do, this year no pics were taken.
Didn't plant much this year only tomatoes, summer squash, black oil sunflower.
I use the small green tomatoes and pickle them.  Cut them in quarters, then
put them in fridge.  50% apple cider vinegar, 50% water, little salt, garlic, red pepper flakes.
Use to get crazy making brine, now I just make it up.  Bushy small peppers do great in containers
on the patio, and look good.  Wife used containers this year to help along some small trees that
just popped up, and have no idea what they are.  There about a foot now and need to figure
out where to plant them mid-late fall.

Designed and built a garden hoop house which you can walk in, to keep the critters out.
My wife went crazy pickling this summer and our cellar looks like we are survivalists. We will be doing a lot of food gifts for family this year.
I want to build a hoop house also to extend our season.
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline Fire Rooster

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Re: Harvest
« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2020, 02:08:22 PM »
"I want to build a hoop house also to extend our season."

Netting is used over hoop house so wind and rain flow through easily, and to keep birds out.
Tried creating a green house to start early, and to extend season, with rolls of clear plastic.
Didn't work out, heating and lighting became an issue, along with snow loads, and high wind.
Having constant ventilation was another issue, to prevent a warm moist environment
for mold etc.. Which is a typical problem for green houses.  My hoop house is 8' tall
10' wide and 14' long.

I also removed the soil, placed wire mesh on bottom/sides then returned soil.
This prevents ground creatures from eating the roots.

Starting seeds indoors at the proper time, for each vegetable to be ready for the last frost date,
works for me.  Although things like garlic, you probably planted them in late fall.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2020, 06:06:01 PM by Fire Rooster »