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Author Topic: Pseudo-Lagers  (Read 7655 times)

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: Pseudo-Lagers
« Reply #30 on: November 11, 2020, 08:38:46 am »
Taphouse just one question, I'm gonna brew some lager next years, but I can't force carbon my beers only priming, after lagering like 4-6 weeks, low OG beers, nothing higher than 1,060, there a problem doing lagering in the primary fermenter and after complete the lagering just primming and bottle and wait or more yeast? and can I do this, primary, D rest, check if the fermentation is complete, cold crash, gelatin, bottle and lagering in the bottle for this time?
I can't answer that because I never tried it.  In my bottling days I would ferment the lager normally and probably send it to a secondary (this was 15+ years ago) and then send it to the bottling bucket with priming solution and bottle it and leave it at room temp for 2+ weeks for carb to form (this could technically be a sort of d-rest as well).  Then I would send those bottles into the fridge and allow them to sit and lager until they seemed ready.  On the topic of whether there would be enough healthy yeast to prime... with the above schedule I was always able to get the bottles to prime even if the beer looked crystal clear.  But I was not lagering for weeks and weeks and then bottling.  When I bottled it may have been only 3-4 weeks after brewday.  I hope I answered that completely.
Thanks for the response, gonna think about all this and read a little more to see what I'm gonna do, but maybe just pitching more yeast after lagering and a calling a day.
Cheers
I have heard of other brewers adding a bit of yeast at bottling to make sure the bottles primed so that is always an option.  If I were to try that now (and believe me I have thought about it... there is just something about a 'bottle of beer' that has a certain lure) I would probably ferment as usual... in the fridge for 4-5 days, then leave the fermenter on the basement floor for another week for things to settle, then run it off to a bottling bucket with priming solution and bottle (risking O2 pickup for sure).  Then leave the bottles in a warmish spot for 2 weeks and then either send them to the fridge or maybe even box them up and leave them in my Chicagoland garage over the winter and let them sit for another 2+ months to lager and condition and then just occasionally check them.  Want to make it even better?  Use kraeusen to carb them.  Good luck. 
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Pseudo-Lagers
« Reply #31 on: November 12, 2020, 04:35:14 am »
Whichever process selected for bottling, I always bottled one plastic bottle as a “carb checker”.  When the plastic bottle was firmed up, I knew the glass bottles should also be carbed.  From there cold lagering can begin.  Just my 2 cents.  Cheers!
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Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: Pseudo-Lagers
« Reply #32 on: November 12, 2020, 07:32:46 am »
Whichever process selected for bottling, I always bottled one plastic bottle as a “carb checker”.  When the plastic bottle was firmed up, I knew the glass bottles should also be carbed.  From there cold lagering can begin.  Just my 2 cents.  Cheers!
I did the same.  I had some buds send me beer in brown plastic bottles with a white screw cap.  They may have been about a quart or so.  Hmm, I think my wife threw those out.   ::)
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

Offline Descardeci

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Re: Pseudo-Lagers
« Reply #33 on: November 12, 2020, 09:08:42 am »
Taphouse just one question, I'm gonna brew some lager next years, but I can't force carbon my beers only priming, after lagering like 4-6 weeks, low OG beers, nothing higher than 1,060, there a problem doing lagering in the primary fermenter and after complete the lagering just primming and bottle and wait or more yeast? and can I do this, primary, D rest, check if the fermentation is complete, cold crash, gelatin, bottle and lagering in the bottle for this time?
I can't answer that because I never tried it.  In my bottling days I would ferment the lager normally and probably send it to a secondary (this was 15+ years ago) and then send it to the bottling bucket with priming solution and bottle it and leave it at room temp for 2+ weeks for carb to form (this could technically be a sort of d-rest as well).  Then I would send those bottles into the fridge and allow them to sit and lager until they seemed ready.  On the topic of whether there would be enough healthy yeast to prime... with the above schedule I was always able to get the bottles to prime even if the beer looked crystal clear.  But I was not lagering for weeks and weeks and then bottling.  When I bottled it may have been only 3-4 weeks after brewday.  I hope I answered that completely.
Thanks for the response, gonna think about all this and read a little more to see what I'm gonna do, but maybe just pitching more yeast after lagering and a calling a day.
Cheers
I have heard of other brewers adding a bit of yeast at bottling to make sure the bottles primed so that is always an option.  If I were to try that now (and believe me I have thought about it... there is just something about a 'bottle of beer' that has a certain lure) I would probably ferment as usual... in the fridge for 4-5 days, then leave the fermenter on the basement floor for another week for things to settle, then run it off to a bottling bucket with priming solution and bottle (risking O2 pickup for sure).  Then leave the bottles in a warmish spot for 2 weeks and then either send them to the fridge or maybe even box them up and leave them in my Chicagoland garage over the winter and let them sit for another 2+ months to lager and condition and then just occasionally check them.  Want to make it even better?  Use kraeusen to carb them.  Good luck.
I was think of doing that, thanks for the tip, and gonna think of using krausen for carbonation, and ynotbrusum I'm using only pet amber bottle for now, the supplie of big glass bottle is not so good, shipping cost is too damn high and with my bottles I can only carb to 2.5 vols of CO2, and for a british beer is ok, but some germans styles not so much, and I had some bottle bombs in the past, now I use those bottle with caution. Thanks all for the response and cheer folks