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Author Topic: Amber Malt  (Read 1652 times)

Offline HopDen

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Amber Malt
« on: October 30, 2020, 03:46:07 pm »
Has anyone used amber malt in excess of 10% I read that one shouldn't go above 10% in most recipes.

Heres my recipe: 64% Mild Malt
                          18% Amber
                          7% Oats
                          4.5% Brown

This is a recipe by Randy Mosher that is 99% identical but scaled from 5 to 17 gallons.
My gut feeling is to just go with it and hope for the best to the degree it will not be too bitter or dry.

Thoughts?

Offline roger

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Re: Amber Malt
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2020, 04:35:10 am »
I have used Crisp Amber malt only a couple of times, and and only at 5%. Will be curious to hear responses from those who have.

This malt, like many others, seems to vary considerably by maltster. Below are descriptions of 3 maltsters from their or their distributors' websites. Note Simpsons max. usage is 20%. Am curious if Mosher mentioned a specific maltster?

Crisp- William Crisp Amber Malt is a kilned specialty malt. It has a strong biscuity, toasted grain flavor and imparts amber and copper hues. Amber malt is traditionally used in medium or dark English ales, especially brown ale, mild ale, and old ale. The dry taste of Amber malt is an excellent compliment to bitter hoppiness, making it a nice addition to IPAs. The color is listed at 23-35 L, and usage up to 10%.

Simpsons- Perhaps the most versatile of all our roasted products, Simpsons’ Amber Malt can be used in a wide variety of beers to add biscuity toasty notes and a beautiful brown hue. Its delicate roast flavour makes it suitable for adding toasty notes to all Dark Beers, as well as lighter Ales and Lagers. Amber Malt brings a clean, crisp dryness to balance delicate floral hops and increases foam stability. Color 54-71 EBC (21-27 L), and usage up to 20%.

Dingeman- The intensive germination and a mildly kilning will add a very strong malt aroma and a deep reddish color. Amber malt clearly improves flavor stability.  The malt is rather low in diastatic power therefore it can only be used up to 30%. Color 19 L.
Roger

Offline mabrungard

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Re: Amber Malt
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2020, 07:21:22 am »
I agree that “amber” is a deceptive term from maltsters. Some of those malts are apparently roasted and they tend to have the acidity character of roast malts (acidity not proportional to color) while other amber malts have acidity proportional to color. I haven’t deciphered which are which. All I can advise is that brewers be aware of this potential.
Martin B
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Offline Kevin

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Re: Amber Malt
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2020, 09:30:41 am »
I have used Amber between 16 and 20% with no problem.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Amber Malt
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2020, 09:51:32 am »
I have used Crisp Amber malt only a couple of times, and and only at 5%. Will be curious to hear responses from those who have.

This malt, like many others, seems to vary considerably by maltster. Below are descriptions of 3 maltsters from their or their distributors' websites. Note Simpsons max. usage is 20%. Am curious if Mosher mentioned a specific maltster?

Crisp- William Crisp Amber Malt is a kilned specialty malt. It has a strong biscuity, toasted grain flavor and imparts amber and copper hues. Amber malt is traditionally used in medium or dark English ales, especially brown ale, mild ale, and old ale. The dry taste of Amber malt is an excellent compliment to bitter hoppiness, making it a nice addition to IPAs. The color is listed at 23-35 L, and usage up to 10%.

Simpsons- Perhaps the most versatile of all our roasted products, Simpsons’ Amber Malt can be used in a wide variety of beers to add biscuity toasty notes and a beautiful brown hue. Its delicate roast flavour makes it suitable for adding toasty notes to all Dark Beers, as well as lighter Ales and Lagers. Amber Malt brings a clean, crisp dryness to balance delicate floral hops and increases foam stability. Color 54-71 EBC (21-27 L), and usage up to 20%.

Dingeman- The intensive germination and a mildly kilning will add a very strong malt aroma and a deep reddish color. Amber malt clearly improves flavor stability.  The malt is rather low in diastatic power therefore it can only be used up to 30%. Color 19 L.

I believe that Dingeman's Amber is a rebranding/renaming of their Aromatic malt.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline roger

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Re: Amber Malt
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2020, 03:38:30 pm »
I believe that Dingeman's Amber is a rebranding/renaming of their Aromatic malt.
[/quote]

Agreed, in fact their spec sheet for Aromatic is labeled "Amber MD.pdf."

The lesson learned for me is don't trust the labels maltsters use for their products. Know your ingredients.

Even the difference between Crisp and Simpson's amber malt is confusing. Their descriptions sound similar, but Crisp recommends use up to 10% while Simpson's is up to 20%. So when someone says they successfully use Amber malt at 20%, it will be helpful to know which maltster they used.

IDK if their malts are similar and their descriptions and usage recommendations vary, or if their malts are that much different.
Roger