Author Topic: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs  (Read 3877 times)

Offline Oiscout

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #60 on: November 26, 2020, 01:23:29 pm »
 Fishing about an north of the line in the yellow breeches area is some of the best fishing I've done. And I've had the pleasure of spending my formative years in the swamps of georgia.

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Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #61 on: November 26, 2020, 02:07:21 pm »
Fishing about an north of the line in the yellow breeches area is some of the best fishing I've done. And I've had the pleasure of spending my formative years in the swamps of georgia.

I have fished Yellow Breeches.  It is not the prettiest stream I have fly fished, but the fishing is good.

Offline Oiscout

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #62 on: November 26, 2020, 02:12:12 pm »
Definitely not pretty, a few years back their hatchery was flooded and killed most of their breeders, their rod and gun club have been having a hard time recovering. I fish out in franklin county in oath valley. Absolutely nothing but wilderness

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Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #63 on: November 26, 2020, 02:51:30 pm »
My wonderful better half planned a brewery get away for us for my birthday, and I've had some very tasty beers, one of which is probably the best pilsner I've ever had. But holy God have IPAs taken over every brewery I've been to so far. Ad I've gotten older India pale ales give me terrible heart burn and all around taste almost the same or so identical it's hard to tell apart

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Someone needs to tell these craft brewers that there are beers besides IPA's.

In my youth IPA's were my favorite, especially the hoppy ones. Thankfully, I outgrew that phase of my beer drinking years ago.

It is rare to find a craft brewery that brews a good Pils, Marzen, Fest Bier, or Munich Helles. They exist, but they are pretty rare...at least in my part of the world.

they know other styles exist, but IPA's sell. ALOT. 75% of Russian Rivers tap sales is Pliny The Elder. Thank about that, a brewery that has dozens of world class beers and Pliny makes up 75% of their tap sales.
My professional brewer friends would love to not have half their taps dedicated to IPA's, but the market is driving that trend. They call Saisons "stays on" because they stay on tap so long. Another pro brewer jokes that staff make up 25 % of their porter consumption. Another told me their lager sales increased when they started just calling it a blonde ale.

Just like Anheuser-Busch, Miller-Coors, and others know different beers exist. But the big market demand is for Miller Lite, Coors Light, and Bud Light. So you cannot equate total sales (off the shelf, or on draft) with the desirability of the beer among educated beer consumers.
All of my brewing friends are middle aged, and none of us drink IPA's. At least not on purpose!

Edit: I am very biased in my beer taste, preferring good clean, full flavored Euro Lagers. It's a personal problem of mine. I outgrew IPA's several decades ago.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2020, 03:03:19 pm by TXFlyGuy »
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Offline BeerfanOz

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #64 on: November 26, 2020, 06:08:03 pm »
How about sours? Well not so much sours as the new fad here in Oz for fake sours with fake fruit in a psychedelic painted can that are outrageously overpriced and have barely any fruit or sour flavour, and what little fruit or sour flavour is there is clearly fake.

There are some craft breweries who are doing good  ones but there’s a lot of rubbish ones.

At the end of the day it’s just beer, and I can handle it when they’re not so great, but when i pay overs for beer that just tastes like a plain blonde ale with lactic acid and fruit essence it’s a bit annoying
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Offline Megary

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #65 on: November 26, 2020, 08:10:41 pm »
My wonderful better half planned a brewery get away for us for my birthday, and I've had some very tasty beers, one of which is probably the best pilsner I've ever had. But holy God have IPAs taken over every brewery I've been to so far. Ad I've gotten older India pale ales give me terrible heart burn and all around taste almost the same or so identical it's hard to tell apart

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk

Someone needs to tell these craft brewers that there are beers besides IPA's.

In my youth IPA's were my favorite, especially the hoppy ones. Thankfully, I outgrew that phase of my beer drinking years ago.

It is rare to find a craft brewery that brews a good Pils, Marzen, Fest Bier, or Munich Helles. They exist, but they are pretty rare...at least in my part of the world.

they know other styles exist, but IPA's sell. ALOT. 75% of Russian Rivers tap sales is Pliny The Elder. Thank about that, a brewery that has dozens of world class beers and Pliny makes up 75% of their tap sales.
My professional brewer friends would love to not have half their taps dedicated to IPA's, but the market is driving that trend. They call Saisons "stays on" because they stay on tap so long. Another pro brewer jokes that staff make up 25 % of their porter consumption. Another told me their lager sales increased when they started just calling it a blonde ale.

Just like Anheuser-Busch, Miller-Coors, and others know different beers exist. But the big market demand is for Miller Lite, Coors Light, and Bud Light. So you cannot equate total sales (off the shelf, or on draft) with the desirability of the beer among educated beer consumers.
All of my brewing friends are middle aged, and none of us drink IPA's. At least not on purpose!

Edit: I am very biased in my beer taste, preferring good clean, full flavored Euro Lagers. It's a personal problem of mine. I outgrew IPA's several decades ago.

Interesting take.  It’s always important to know what one likes!  Good on you.  But I don’t wave flags and I’m thankful I haven’t boxed myself in style-wise so I can still enjoy the many fantastic craft beers being brewed today, including IPA’s (even if the style isn’t my go-to).  I outgrew bad beer decades ago, and I appreciate the variety and craft every time I walk into my local distributor. These are great days to be a beer lover.

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #66 on: November 27, 2020, 06:21:21 am »
And I'll add these are great days to be a beer brewer. The ingredients available to us today are equal to what the big brewers have. And with good equipment, any one of us can brew a beer that rivals any of the legacy establishment breweries.

I won 1st Place at the North Texas State Fair for my American Pale Ale. So...I can drink an ale. But it's not my first choice, or even my third choice.
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Offline denny

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #67 on: November 27, 2020, 08:30:41 am »
My wonderful better half planned a brewery get away for us for my birthday, and I've had some very tasty beers, one of which is probably the best pilsner I've ever had. But holy God have IPAs taken over every brewery I've been to so far. Ad I've gotten older India pale ales give me terrible heart burn and all around taste almost the same or so identical it's hard to tell apart

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk

Someone needs to tell these craft brewers that there are beers besides IPA's.

In my youth IPA's were my favorite, especially the hoppy ones. Thankfully, I outgrew that phase of my beer drinking years ago.

It is rare to find a craft brewery that brews a good Pils, Marzen, Fest Bier, or Munich Helles. They exist, but they are pretty rare...at least in my part of the world.

they know other styles exist, but IPA's sell. ALOT. 75% of Russian Rivers tap sales is Pliny The Elder. Thank about that, a brewery that has dozens of world class beers and Pliny makes up 75% of their tap sales.
My professional brewer friends would love to not have half their taps dedicated to IPA's, but the market is driving that trend. They call Saisons "stays on" because they stay on tap so long. Another pro brewer jokes that staff make up 25 % of their porter consumption. Another told me their lager sales increased when they started just calling it a blonde ale.

Just like Anheuser-Busch, Miller-Coors, and others know different beers exist. But the big market demand is for Miller Lite, Coors Light, and Bud Light. So you cannot equate total sales (off the shelf, or on draft) with the desirability of the beer among educated beer consumers.
All of my brewing friends are middle aged, and none of us drink IPA's. At least not on purpose!

Edit: I am very biased in my beer taste, preferring good clean, full flavored Euro Lagers. It's a personal problem of mine. I outgrew IPA's several decades ago.

Outgrew IPAs......HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!
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Offline denny

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #68 on: November 27, 2020, 08:31:27 am »
My wonderful better half planned a brewery get away for us for my birthday, and I've had some very tasty beers, one of which is probably the best pilsner I've ever had. But holy God have IPAs taken over every brewery I've been to so far. Ad I've gotten older India pale ales give me terrible heart burn and all around taste almost the same or so identical it's hard to tell apart

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk

Someone needs to tell these craft brewers that there are beers besides IPA's.

In my youth IPA's were my favorite, especially the hoppy ones. Thankfully, I outgrew that phase of my beer drinking years ago.

It is rare to find a craft brewery that brews a good Pils, Marzen, Fest Bier, or Munich Helles. They exist, but they are pretty rare...at least in my part of the world.

they know other styles exist, but IPA's sell. ALOT. 75% of Russian Rivers tap sales is Pliny The Elder. Thank about that, a brewery that has dozens of world class beers and Pliny makes up 75% of their tap sales.
My professional brewer friends would love to not have half their taps dedicated to IPA's, but the market is driving that trend. They call Saisons "stays on" because they stay on tap so long. Another pro brewer jokes that staff make up 25 % of their porter consumption. Another told me their lager sales increased when they started just calling it a blonde ale.

Just like Anheuser-Busch, Miller-Coors, and others know different beers exist. But the big market demand is for Miller Lite, Coors Light, and Bud Light. So you cannot equate total sales (off the shelf, or on draft) with the desirability of the beer among educated beer consumers.
All of my brewing friends are middle aged, and none of us drink IPA's. At least not on purpose!

Edit: I am very biased in my beer taste, preferring good clean, full flavored Euro Lagers. It's a personal problem of mine. I outgrew IPA's several decades ago.

Interesting take.  It’s always important to know what one likes!  Good on you.  But I don’t wave flags and I’m thankful I haven’t boxed myself in style-wise so I can still enjoy the many fantastic craft beers being brewed today, including IPA’s (even if the style isn’t my go-to).  I outgrew bad beer decades ago, and I appreciate the variety and craft every time I walk into my local distributor. These are great days to be a beer lover.

Well said
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Offline Wilbur

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #69 on: November 27, 2020, 09:18:53 am »
My wonderful better half planned a brewery get away for us for my birthday, and I've had some very tasty beers, one of which is probably the best pilsner I've ever had. But holy God have IPAs taken over every brewery I've been to so far. Ad I've gotten older India pale ales give me terrible heart burn and all around taste almost the same or so identical it's hard to tell apart

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk

Someone needs to tell these craft brewers that there are beers besides IPA's.

In my youth IPA's were my favorite, especially the hoppy ones. Thankfully, I outgrew that phase of my beer drinking years ago.

It is rare to find a craft brewery that brews a good Pils, Marzen, Fest Bier, or Munich Helles. They exist, but they are pretty rare...at least in my part of the world.

they know other styles exist, but IPA's sell. ALOT. 75% of Russian Rivers tap sales is Pliny The Elder. Thank about that, a brewery that has dozens of world class beers and Pliny makes up 75% of their tap sales.
My professional brewer friends would love to not have half their taps dedicated to IPA's, but the market is driving that trend. They call Saisons "stays on" because they stay on tap so long. Another pro brewer jokes that staff make up 25 % of their porter consumption. Another told me their lager sales increased when they started just calling it a blonde ale.

My thinking is since good light lagers are so challenging to brew, and ales by and large are easier / less expensive to brew, most brew pubs stick with ales.
In my travels throughout Europe, finding an ale on tap is a bit rare...but there is a small brew pub in Amsterdam that had some ales. I'm sure there are others, but lagers seem to rule over there.
Are they really so challenging to brew? There's only so many variables to play around with, and the same process flaws will wreck an IPA or porter. I think there's been the GDP of a small country spent on research for lagers, although there seems to be an lot more emphasis on researching hopping techniques and oils recently. I think it's really just cultural differences that make up the differences between the US and Europe. I also think it's a lot harder to to sell a $12 6 pack of craft lager when it's sitting next to a $12 18 or 30 pack of corona or bud.

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Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #70 on: November 27, 2020, 10:25:00 am »
Are they really so challenging to brew? There's only so many variables to play around with, and the same process flaws will wreck an IPA or porter. I think there's been the GDP of a small country spent on research for lagers, although there seems to be an lot more emphasis on researching hopping techniques and oils recently. I think it's really just cultural differences that make up the differences between the US and Europe. I also think it's a lot harder to to sell a $12 6 pack of craft lager when it's sitting next to a $12 18 or 30 pack of corona or bud.

Yes, American light lager is more challenging to brew than ale.  The main reason is because the flavor is so light that even minute flaws stick out like sore thumbs. Why do think why so many new brewers stick with porter, stouts, and other flavor positive styles after failing with lighter, less positive styles?  In the case of IPA, dry hopping will hide a multitude of sins, not the least of which is excessive higher alcohol production.

Offline denny

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #71 on: November 27, 2020, 10:27:00 am »
Are they really so challenging to brew? There's only so many variables to play around with, and the same process flaws will wreck an IPA or porter. I think there's been the GDP of a small country spent on research for lagers, although there seems to be an lot more emphasis on researching hopping techniques and oils recently. I think it's really just cultural differences that make up the differences between the US and Europe. I also think it's a lot harder to to sell a $12 6 pack of craft lager when it's sitting next to a $12 18 or 30 pack of corona or bud.

Yes, American light lager is more challenging to brew than ale.  The main reason is because the flavor is so light that even minute flaws stick out like sore thumbs. Why do think why so many new brewers stick with porter, stouts, and other flavor positive styles after failing with lighter, less positive styles?  In the case of IPA, dry hopping will hide a multitude of sins, not the least of which is excessive higher alcohol production.

They stick with porters stouts, etc. because it's a business and that's what people want to buy.
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Offline Megary

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #72 on: November 27, 2020, 11:16:20 am »
Are they really so challenging to brew? There's only so many variables to play around with, and the same process flaws will wreck an IPA or porter. I think there's been the GDP of a small country spent on research for lagers, although there seems to be an lot more emphasis on researching hopping techniques and oils recently. I think it's really just cultural differences that make up the differences between the US and Europe. I also think it's a lot harder to to sell a $12 6 pack of craft lager when it's sitting next to a $12 18 or 30 pack of corona or bud.

Yes, American light lager is more challenging to brew than ale.  The main reason is because the flavor is so light that even minute flaws stick out like sore thumbs. Why do think why so many new brewers stick with porter, stouts, and other flavor positive styles after failing with lighter, less positive styles?  In the case of IPA, dry hopping will hide a multitude of sins, not the least of which is excessive higher alcohol production.

They stick with porters stouts, etc. because it's a business and that's what people want to buy.

+1

I enjoy “flavor positive” as opposed to...well...not flavor positive.   ;D

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #73 on: November 27, 2020, 01:46:23 pm »
Are they really so challenging to brew? There's only so many variables to play around with, and the same process flaws will wreck an IPA or porter. I think there's been the GDP of a small country spent on research for lagers, although there seems to be an lot more emphasis on researching hopping techniques and oils recently. I think it's really just cultural differences that make up the differences between the US and Europe. I also think it's a lot harder to to sell a $12 6 pack of craft lager when it's sitting next to a $12 18 or 30 pack of corona or bud.

Yes, American light lager is more challenging to brew than ale.  The main reason is because the flavor is so light that even minute flaws stick out like sore thumbs. Why do think why so many new brewers stick with porter, stouts, and other flavor positive styles after failing with lighter, less positive styles?  In the case of IPA, dry hopping will hide a multitude of sins, not the least of which is excessive higher alcohol production.

They stick with porters stouts, etc. because it's a business and that's what people want to buy.

Probably so. But the craft beer pubs that are in my part of the world rarely have a Porter or a Stout on tap. Nor do they have a good Munich Helles on tap. But you will always find IPA's available.
It's so bad that we rarely go out anymore. Plus with 6 beers on tap in my upstairs bar, no reason to go out. And...you won't find an IPA in my house! Or any of my friend's houses.
And not in any of the bars that I frequented in Frankfurt, Munich, Amsterdam, Tokyo. I did find a bar in London that had some American style ales, with the obligatory IPA.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2020, 01:47:56 pm by TXFlyGuy »
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Offline denny

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Re: Anyone else grown tired of IPAs
« Reply #74 on: November 27, 2020, 02:01:00 pm »
Are they really so challenging to brew? There's only so many variables to play around with, and the same process flaws will wreck an IPA or porter. I think there's been the GDP of a small country spent on research for lagers, although there seems to be an lot more emphasis on researching hopping techniques and oils recently. I think it's really just cultural differences that make up the differences between the US and Europe. I also think it's a lot harder to to sell a $12 6 pack of craft lager when it's sitting next to a $12 18 or 30 pack of corona or bud.

Yes, American light lager is more challenging to brew than ale.  The main reason is because the flavor is so light that even minute flaws stick out like sore thumbs. Why do think why so many new brewers stick with porter, stouts, and other flavor positive styles after failing with lighter, less positive styles?  In the case of IPA, dry hopping will hide a multitude of sins, not the least of which is excessive higher alcohol production.

They stick with porters stouts, etc. because it's a business and that's what people want to buy.

Probably so. But the craft beer pubs that are in my part of the world rarely have a Porter or a Stout on tap. Nor do they have a good Munich Helles on tap. But you will always find IPA's available.
It's so bad that we rarely go out anymore. Plus with 6 beers on tap in my upstairs bar, no reason to go out. And...you won't find an IPA in my house! Or any of my friend's houses.
And not in any of the bars that I frequented in Frankfurt, Munich, Amsterdam, Tokyo. I did find a bar in London that had some American style ales, with the obligatory IPA.

It's a business, not a charity.  They brew what sells.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell