Author Topic: Belgian Golden Strong Bottling  (Read 238 times)

Offline Tfwebster

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Belgian Golden Strong Bottling
« on: December 06, 2020, 01:13:41 PM »
I'm just over a week into fermenting my first Belgian golden strong, and I'm trying to decide how to bottle. I am still determining the end of fermentation schedule,  but I definitely have to bottle carbonate. I don't currently have any bottles capable of taking especially high pressure,  but I'm searching. Does my need for bottle carbing impact my fermentation plan and how? Too risky to bottle fermentation and, if I do, any advice on how to do it? Thank you.
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Offline dannyjed

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Re: Belgian Golden Strong Bottling
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2020, 02:43:44 PM »
Now Belgian beers can have a high carbonation, but you don’t need to get special bottles. I would carbonate it to around 2.5 volumes. Wait another week or so until the yeast have finished and have dropped. Then, go ahead and bottle. I use table sugar.


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Dan Chisholm

Offline erockrph

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Re: Belgian Golden Strong Bottling
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2020, 03:35:21 PM »
Now Belgian beers can have a high carbonation, but you don’t need to get special bottles. I would carbonate it to around 2.5 volumes. Wait another week or so until the yeast have finished and have dropped. Then, go ahead and bottle. I use table sugar.


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Belgian beers are typically carbonated to the 3.5-4 volumes of CO2 range, and I certainly wouldn't do that without bottles that are able to withstand the higher carbonation levels.

Normal bottles can handle 3 volumes without a problem. You might be able to push it a little higher, but you're rolling the dice there.

As far as fermentation goes, the key thing is to make sure that the beer is finished before bottling. If the beer isn't at a stable FG then it can overcarbonate in the bottle.

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Eric B.

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