Author Topic: Sulphur question  (Read 1465 times)

Offline BrianBrews88

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Sulphur question
« on: December 21, 2020, 08:57:34 am »
I have been fermenting lagers with 34/70 under about 15 psi at 60 Fahrenheit. They are coming out nice and clean. The only issue I’m wondering about is that I cannot detect any sulphur whatsoever in the beer.

I know you do not want a lot of sulphur in a lager, but am i wrong that a very small amount is characteristic to a lager?

Should I try another strain? Could it be my water?

Offline Cliffs

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2020, 09:26:02 am »
perhaps the higher ferm temp is blowing off the sulfur?

Offline BrianBrews88

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2020, 09:40:02 am »
That could be the case, maybe I’ll try a traditional temp.

I’m wondering if other people get this too. Reminds me of why I love to homebrew, there is no magic cure-all method to brewing. Pros and cons to everything!

Offline Cliffs

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2020, 09:40:56 am »
That could be the case, maybe I’ll try a traditional temp.

I’m wondering if other people get this too. Reminds me of why I love to homebrew, there is no magic cure-all method to brewing. Pros and cons to everything!
in my experience, 34/70 isnt as sulfury as some other lager yeasts either.

Offline RC

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2020, 09:46:48 am »
A tick of sulfur is usually desired in most lager styles, especially the paler ones. IMO lagers without it are bland. 34/70 produces that tick very readily, but I'm guessing it's missing because you're fermenting under pressure. I don't think temp has anything to do with this.

Offline Cliffs

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2020, 10:07:01 am »
A tick of sulfur is usually desired in most lager styles, especially the paler ones. IMO lagers without it are bland. 34/70 produces that tick very readily, but I'm guessing it's missing because you're fermenting under pressure. I don't think temp has anything to do with this.
would the pressure keep more sulfur in solution, or somehow suppress its formation?

Offline majorvices

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2020, 10:09:14 am »
I don't think of sulphur as being a desired characteristic. It's more a problem than anything.

Offline BrianBrews88

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #7 on: December 21, 2020, 10:12:34 am »
Hmmm, I know it isn’t something you want a lot of in any beer. I do find it helps define some lagers is small amounts. Not something that jumps out at you, but very subtly there.

It could just be my taste. I think it helps some lagers seem crisp. But having them with zero sulphur that I can detect at all almost tastes like it’s missing something to me.

Offline Cliffs

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2020, 10:13:51 am »
I don't think of sulphur as being a desired characteristic. It's more a problem than anything.

Its a component in alot of lagers, that being said, I dont like it. I'd rather not have matchsticks in my beer

Offline BrianBrews88

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2020, 10:14:48 am »
A tick of sulfur is usually desired in most lager styles, especially the paler ones. IMO lagers without it are bland. 34/70 produces that tick very readily, but I'm guessing it's missing because you're fermenting under pressure. I don't think temp has anything to do with this.


I should do a side by side and see

Offline denny

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #10 on: December 21, 2020, 10:15:58 am »
I don't think of sulphur as being a desired characteristic. It's more a problem than anything.

I'm with you, buddy.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline BrianBrews88

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #11 on: December 21, 2020, 10:23:41 am »
I don’t want a lot of it, but am wondering if it is why my pale lagers seem a little flabby. I notice it in many commercial examples so I thought it was typical.


Offline RC

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2020, 10:31:09 am »
Hmmm, I know it isn’t something you want a lot of in any beer. I do find it helps define some lagers is small amounts. Not something that jumps out at you, but very subtly there.

It could just be my taste. I think it helps some lagers seem crisp. But having them with zero sulphur that I can detect at all almost tastes like it’s missing something to me.

I totally agree with this, but it might just be you and me here. Just a hint of sulfur adds a bite, a crispness, that I enjoy in pale lagers especially.

The style guidelines allow for "slight yeast-derived sulfur notes" in many lager styles. "Slight" definitely being the operative word. It takes hardly any additional sulfur to go from pleasing to undrinkable.

Offline denny

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2020, 10:39:57 am »
I don’t want a lot of it, but am wondering if it is why my pale lagers seem a little flabby. I notice it in many commercial examples so I thought it was typical.

Try a Bitburger and tell me if you get sulfur.  Or a Trumer.

Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline BrianBrews88

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Re: Sulphur question
« Reply #14 on: December 21, 2020, 10:54:58 am »
Will do Denny, but I’ll wait until it’s a little later!

I’m also thinking it could be my water, I don’t treat it other than removing chlorine with campden tablets and adjusting the ph. Maybe that is why mine isn’t tasting as crisp. Maybe it isn’t sulphur at all I’m missing.

I’ll try a side by side batch of traditional and pressure and see if I notice a difference.