Author Topic: Wheat for Head  (Read 2340 times)

Offline Village Taphouse

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1341
  • Ken from Chicago
    • The new Mayfair Court Brewhouse
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #45 on: January 08, 2021, 03:36:02 PM »
I like the "clean beer glass" method of just washing with soap and hot water and a sponge, getting all the spots on the glass and then rinsing with hot water and placing upside down on a towel to air-dry.  Sometimes beer glasses end up in the dishwasher here but I try to hand wash them with the above process. 
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

Offline Megary

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 503
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #46 on: January 08, 2021, 04:09:33 PM »
Hmm.  I'll only hand wash my stemmed beer glasses...tulips, goblets.  I don't trust the dishwasher to keep them safe.
But my pint glasses, flutes, mugs...they go right in the DW.  I've never had any head retention issues associated with an oily, dirty glass.

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 24011
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #47 on: January 08, 2021, 04:26:42 PM »
To check for a clean glass even just out of the dishwasher I do the old salt method. Wet the inside of the glass with water, dump out excess water. Then hold the glass at a 45 degree angle and sprinkle salt down the sides of the glass. Where ever the salt doesn't stick has oil or needs cleaned. I know the old timers know this but I thought it might help newbies to kegging. cheers.

You can also scrub the glass with the salt.  Works great.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline goose

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 947
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #48 on: January 08, 2021, 04:28:16 PM »
I like the "clean beer glass" method of just washing with soap and hot water and a sponge, getting all the spots on the glass and then rinsing with hot water and placing upside down on a towel to air-dry.  Sometimes beer glasses end up in the dishwasher here but I try to hand wash them with the above process.

+1

All of my beer glasses get washed by hand due to the fact that my crappy water (even after being softened by a water softener will eventually etch the glass in my dishwasher.  I use dish washing liquid (like Dawn), hot water, and a Dobie pad to clean the glasses.  Takes a small amount of elbow grease to scrub them if they sit overnight but they get clean with this method.
Goose Steingass
Wooster, OH
Society of Akron Area Zymurgists (SAAZ)
Wayne County Brew Club
Mansfield Brew Club
BJCP Certified
AHA Governing Committee Member

Offline Village Taphouse

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1341
  • Ken from Chicago
    • The new Mayfair Court Brewhouse
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #49 on: January 08, 2021, 04:38:31 PM »
I like the "clean beer glass" method of just washing with soap and hot water and a sponge, getting all the spots on the glass and then rinsing with hot water and placing upside down on a towel to air-dry.  Sometimes beer glasses end up in the dishwasher here but I try to hand wash them with the above process.

+1

All of my beer glasses get washed by hand due to the fact that my crappy water (even after being softened by a water softener will eventually etch the glass in my dishwasher.  I use dish washing liquid (like Dawn), hot water, and a Dobie pad to clean the glasses.  Takes a small amount of elbow grease to scrub them if they sit overnight but they get clean with this method.
When I'm done drinking I fill the beer glass with water and leave it overnight and wash it the next morning so I don't have a dot of sticky beer in the glass when I go to clean it.  I love my beer glasses.  When one gets broken (which is inevitable) I feel like I need to have a special ceremony.  :D  If my dishwasher drying agent stuff (Jetdry, etc) is filled, my beer glasses come out of the dishwasher pretty good.  I do have some glasses with a gold rim and I understand that gold will flake off in the dishwasher and I also have some enameled glassware that apparently does not like the DW because the logo begins to fade.  I'm sure my wife wishes I took as good care of HER as I do my glassware.  :D
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

Offline erockrph

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7001
  • Chepachet, RI
    • The Hop WHisperer
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #50 on: January 08, 2021, 05:16:01 PM »
  If my dishwasher drying agent stuff (Jetdry, etc) is filled, my beer glasses come out of the dishwasher pretty good.  I do have some glasses with a gold rim and I understand that gold will flake off in the dishwasher and I also have some enameled glassware that apparently does not like the DW because the logo begins to fade.  I'm sure my wife wishes I took as good care of HER as I do my glassware.  :D

I try to get to my glasses before my wife loads the dishwasher, because I have several printed pint glasses where the logo has come off in the DW. That always kills me when I see something I collected on a trip somewhere and the logo vanishes. That said, my glasses that go through the DW generally come out in good shape. If I see any spotting, I'll give them a quick rinse and wipe, but otherwise they're fine.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline BrewBama

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4507
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #51 on: January 08, 2021, 09:28:22 PM »
I use the same glass for a session. I am the chief cook and bottle washer around here so I sacrifice foam for labor (or less of it). I might rinse out the used glass between pours — maybe. Life goes on.

I have some special glasses from Germany ‘87-‘90 that get hand washed because they are 30 yr old keepsakes only brought out for special occasions.

... but everyday glassware gets a quick rinse at the end of the session and hit the dishwasher.
wisdom is proved right by her deeds

Brewed in the Tennessee Valley. Rocket City — Huntsville AL

Offline Richard

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 537
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #52 on: January 09, 2021, 05:35:42 AM »
Quote
author=Richard link=topic=36198.msg454572#msg454572 date=1610073938]
...If you ... keep your glassware squeaky clean wheat malt, etc., will help aid or boost that head retention...

Quote
I have found that the best way to clean a glass is to fill it with beer and drink it. Even an imperfectly cleaned glass that has a lot of bubbles on the side the first time will be spotless for the second pour.

Gross. That's a sign of dirty glass. I will pour that down the drain, clean it and get another pour.

That was an attempt at humor on my part. I guess I should have used an emoji to make it clear. Now I have turned this thread in a whole different direction, which was not my intention (although it has been illuminating).
Original Gravity - that would be Newton's

Offline Fire Rooster

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 447
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #53 on: January 09, 2021, 08:25:28 AM »
I bought several pounds of white wheat malt. In hopes of improving head, in the retention department.

How much does it take in a 10 gallon batch?

None.  https://web.archive.org/web/20090809234712/ttp://byo.com/stories/article/indices/35-head-retention/697-getting-good-beer-foam-techniques

In the excellent article referenced by Denny it says:

My experience has been that, if you are having problems with forming a head, adding wheat malt doesn’t help. (On the other hand, if you are already getting decent foam, adding wheat can increase the amount and longevity of foam.)

The question asked in this post was about increasing the longevity of the foam, so wheat might help. The same article says that 1 lb per 10 gallons is the amount generally recommended.

This is my understanding of the purpose of using wheat malt.  The higher protein content (as compared to barley) can aid in foam "retention" and to an extent, mouthfeel.  I use a bit of wheat malt in most of my beers and I *think* it helps.  Can I prove anything?  Of course not.  But I'll keep using it.

There are different protein levels, with different types of wheat.
Those who bake a lot know this.  Looking at protein numbers with different
types of wheat flours in the supermarket will show this.
 
« Last Edit: January 09, 2021, 12:42:27 PM by Fire Rooster »

Offline Megary

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 503
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #54 on: January 09, 2021, 12:50:49 PM »
I bought several pounds of white wheat malt. In hopes of improving head, in the retention department.

How much does it take in a 10 gallon batch?

None.  https://web.archive.org/web/20090809234712/ttp://byo.com/stories/article/indices/35-head-retention/697-getting-good-beer-foam-techniques

In the excellent article referenced by Denny it says:

My experience has been that, if you are having problems with forming a head, adding wheat malt doesn’t help. (On the other hand, if you are already getting decent foam, adding wheat can increase the amount and longevity of foam.)

The question asked in this post was about increasing the longevity of the foam, so wheat might help. The same article says that 1 lb per 10 gallons is the amount generally recommended.

This is my understanding of the purpose of using wheat malt.  The higher protein content (as compared to barley) can aid in foam "retention" and to an extent, mouthfeel.  I use a bit of wheat malt in most of my beers and I *think* it helps.  Can I prove anything?  Of course not.  But I'll keep using it.

There are different protein levels, with different types of wheat.
Those who bake a lot know this.  Looking at protein numbers with different
types of wheat flours in the supermarket will show this.

Agree.  Malt analysis sheets will show this as well. 

Offline Fire Rooster

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 447
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #55 on: January 09, 2021, 01:00:58 PM »
I bought several pounds of white wheat malt. In hopes of improving head, in the retention department.

How much does it take in a 10 gallon batch?

None.  https://web.archive.org/web/20090809234712/ttp://byo.com/stories/article/indices/35-head-retention/697-getting-good-beer-foam-techniques

In the excellent article referenced by Denny it says:

My experience has been that, if you are having problems with forming a head, adding wheat malt doesn’t help. (On the other hand, if you are already getting decent foam, adding wheat can increase the amount and longevity of foam.)

The question asked in this post was about increasing the longevity of the foam, so wheat might help. The same article says that 1 lb per 10 gallons is the amount generally recommended.

This is my understanding of the purpose of using wheat malt.  The higher protein content (as compared to barley) can aid in foam "retention" and to an extent, mouthfeel.  I use a bit of wheat malt in most of my beers and I *think* it helps.  Can I prove anything?  Of course not.  But I'll keep using it.

There are different protein levels, with different types of wheat.
Those who bake a lot know this.  Looking at protein numbers with different
types of wheat flours in the supermarket will show this.

Agree.  Malt analysis sheets will show this as well.

The best I can find online, wheat ranges between 6-18% protein.
White wheat is on the lower end, but I like it. "It's my understanding"
the higher the protein, the higher the propensity for foam.  But as
the protein increases, so does the "robust" taste.

Example:
https://www.lindleymills.com/news/74-wheat-quality-and-protein-levels.html
« Last Edit: January 09, 2021, 06:16:37 PM by Fire Rooster »

Offline TXFlyGuy

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 550
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #56 on: January 09, 2021, 07:01:22 PM »
I like the "clean beer glass" method of just washing with soap and hot water and a sponge, getting all the spots on the glass and then rinsing with hot water and placing upside down on a towel to air-dry.  Sometimes beer glasses end up in the dishwasher here but I try to hand wash them with the above process.

+1

All of my beer glasses get washed by hand due to the fact that my crappy water (even after being softened by a water softener will eventually etch the glass in my dishwasher.  I use dish washing liquid (like Dawn), hot water, and a Dobie pad to clean the glasses.  Takes a small amount of elbow grease to scrub them if they sit overnight but they get clean with this method.
When I'm done drinking I fill the beer glass with water and leave it overnight and wash it the next morning so I don't have a dot of sticky beer in the glass when I go to clean it.  I love my beer glasses.  When one gets broken (which is inevitable) I feel like I need to have a special ceremony.  :D  If my dishwasher drying agent stuff (Jetdry, etc) is filled, my beer glasses come out of the dishwasher pretty good.  I do have some glasses with a gold rim and I understand that gold will flake off in the dishwasher and I also have some enameled glassware that apparently does not like the DW because the logo begins to fade.  I'm sure my wife wishes I took as good care of HER as I do my glassware.  :D

This brings up an interesting point. I have a collection of beer glasses. From many foreign countries, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Holland, Germany, Czech Republic. And I actually hand carried the glasses back to the USA (major pain). To say they are "special", or "prized", is a gross understatement.
Thus most of the time I hand wash them myself. Can't take any chances on the wife dropping one...ask me how I know.
Bluebonnet Brewoff 2021 Winner!

Munich Helles - 1st Place
Oktoberfest   - 1st Place
English Porter - 3rd Place

Offline mabrungard

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2767
  • Water matters!
    • Bru'n Water
Re: Wheat for Head
« Reply #57 on: January 09, 2021, 08:21:48 PM »
Cake flour has lowest protein content, bread flour is highest, and All-Purpose is in between.
Martin B
Carmel, IN

BJCP National
Foam Blowers of Indiana (FBI)

Brewing Water Information at:
https://www.brunwater.com/

Like Bru'n Water on Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/Brun-Water-464551136933908/?ref=bookmarks