Author Topic: WY1275 Thames Valley  (Read 619 times)

Offline Megary

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 437
WY1275 Thames Valley
« on: January 23, 2021, 03:33:53 PM »
Anyone familiar with the temperament of this yeast?

I will be using this yeast for the first time in a Porter tomorrow and was curious as to what I might expect.  I realize every wort is different and there is no "one size fits all" description, but any education would be appreciated.  My usual Porter yeasts are 1450 or Windsor, both of which have given great results.

For 1275, Wyeast says "Med-Low Floc, 77% attenuation, 62-72 temp range".  (Frankly, I would be stunned if I got 77% out of a Porter wort and set the attenuation to 70% in my recipe software.)

My particulars will be one full pack in 3 gallons of approximately 1.060 wort.  Fermentation should start in the low-mid 60's and finish in the mid-upper 60's.

Thanks in advance.

Offline Megary

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 437
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2021, 02:36:08 PM »
Pitched at 74° and lowered to 65°.

1275 said hello in about 5-6 hours, resembling foam in about 12-15 and krausen in fine health at about 24-28.
Currently chugging along unemotionally, with the occasional awkward pause, and apologizing for every burp.

British.

Offline Megary

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 437
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2021, 04:40:35 PM »
Appears finished on day 5 as I'm starting to see the typical fall-out accumulating on the bottom of the fermenter.  Not used to seeing fermentation so obviously finished this quickly...almost like Windsor.  I will be very interested to see what kind of attenuation I get. 

I probably should package it this weekend, but without a free keg, it will likely sit another week.

Offline BrewBama

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4257
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2021, 04:48:22 PM »
+1. English strains are known for fast start and finish but often at the expense of attenuation. As long as you plan for the high finish gravity of those strains to meet your goal they can be a great to use.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
“From man’s sweat and God’s love, beer came into the world.” — St. Arnold

Brewed in the Tennessee Valley. Rocket City — Huntsville AL

Offline Saccharomyces

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 787
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2021, 02:49:55 PM »
We need take into account that 1275 came from the brewery that invented the double-drop brewing system.  In a double-drop brewery, fermentation is started in an elevated fermentation vessel.  After a period of time, the fermenting beer is dropped into a lower fermentation vessel, leaving behind the break and dead yeast cells. Dropping also aerates the wort.  I suspect that 1275 may be an O3 yeast strain with respect to O2 demands.  I personally have never used the culture, but if 1275 is failing to attenuate one's wort and leaving behind diacetyl, then I suspect that short burst of O2 24 hours into the fermentation should rectify the problem.

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 10102
  • Milford, MI
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2021, 03:00:40 PM »
We need take into account that 1275 came from the brewery that invented the double-drop brewing system.  In a double-drop brewery, fermentation is started in an elevated fermentation vessel.  After a period of time, the fermenting beer is dropped into a lower fermentation vessel, leaving behind the break and dead yeast cells. Dropping also aerates the wort.  I suspect that 1275 may be an O3 yeast strain with respect to O2 demands.  I personally have never used the culture, but if 1275 is failing to attenuate one's wort and leaving behind diacetyl, then I suspect that short burst of O2 24 hours into the fermentation should rectify the problem.

I know Brakspear used the double drop system. Fillers used it also, you can see a display two vessels on the tour.

Do you have any links as to the invention of the technique?
Jeff Rankert
AHA Lifetime Member
BJCP National
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline Saccharomyces

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 787
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2021, 06:58:06 PM »
I know Brakspear used the double drop system. Fillers used it also, you can see a display two vessels on the tour.

Do you have any links as to the invention of the technique?

Wyeast 1275 is Brakspear's strain.  From what I have read, Brakspear appears to be the inventor of double-drop fermentation.

Offline Saccharomyces

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 787
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2021, 07:03:01 PM »
I just visited the Brakspear home page.  They claim to be have been double-dropping since 1779.  Brakspear is just a brand these days.

Offline fredthecat

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2021, 07:35:28 PM »
I just visited the Brakspear home page.  They claim to be have been double-dropping since 1779. 

Before it was cool.

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 10102
  • Milford, MI
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2021, 08:32:34 PM »
Jeff Rankert
AHA Lifetime Member
BJCP National
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline Megary

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 437
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2021, 12:45:50 AM »
1275 has formed a tight, compact, smooth layer on the bottom of my fermenter, farther below the valve outlet than I can remember any other fermentation.  About .25gal loss from 3.  Will keg and get FG this weekend.

Offline fredthecat

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 504
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2021, 02:55:05 AM »
1275 has formed a tight, compact, smooth layer on the bottom of my fermenter, farther below the valve outlet than I can remember any other fermentation.  About .25gal loss from 3.  Will keg and get FG this weekend.

i appreciate yeast descriptions, wish there was a concise thread for more of them.

thanks for the observations.

Offline Megary

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 437
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2021, 08:34:58 PM »
Finished at 1.013 from 1.060. 78%.
I’ve never had 78% in a Porter before so I have no idea what to make of this. Sample taste out of primary is straightforward Porter. Wyeast says low fruitiness, low esters and that’s pretty spot on at this point. Maybe a bit fruity in the nose?  A bit dry in the back?  Not carbed up yet so I’ll wait til next week to pass final judgment.

Pretty happy with it at this point, but maybe a Porter wasn’t the best choice to really see what the yeast has to offer. Still, so far so good.

Offline mdyer909

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 71
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #13 on: February 27, 2021, 07:21:39 PM »
I bottled a stout I made with this yeast today.  OG was 1.058 and it finished at 1.011.

Offline Megary

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 437
Re: WY1275 Thames Valley
« Reply #14 on: February 27, 2021, 10:56:48 PM »
I bottled a stout I made with this yeast today.  OG was 1.058 and it finished at 1.011.
Interesting that Wyeast lists attenuation at 72-76%. Here we used it in a Porter and a Stout and got 78 & 81%.

My Porter came out really nice but I certainly wasn’t expecting the attenuation.  The beer definitely leans a bit more to a Dry Stout than an English Porter.  I still haven’t found my #1 Porter yeast just yet.  Still, I wouldn’t hesitate to use 1275 again.  Maybe in a Bitter.