Author Topic: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?  (Read 3157 times)

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #30 on: March 05, 2021, 03:03:23 PM »
AM wheat can be an enjoyable pounder when fresh and on a hot day. Otherwise, its pretty boring.
I can see some people saying this and I understand.  I am usually blown away by 'simple' while others find it boring.  I have some buds and family members who want and need everything that is new or different in their beer:  Sour, new hops and lots of them, brett, nutty new yeasts, belgian complexity, fruity character, etc.  Nothing wrong with that and it's a fascinating new (newish) part of our hobby.  Meanwhile I have pretty run-of-the-mill beers on tap here.  I had some buds over... he's a German-head and she is actually FROM Germany.  I told them "I have a nice helles on tap in the bar" and she winced, "Oh, I don't really like Helles" and my wife was drinking a beer I made for her (Amarillo & Citra Pale Ale) and my wife gave her a sip... that's what she wanted.  You just never know, ya know?  :P

I'm envisioning this American Wheat being consumed fresh and on a hot day so it should be pretty refreshing and poundable. 
« Last Edit: March 05, 2021, 03:04:54 PM by Village Taphouse »
Ken from Chicago

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #31 on: March 05, 2021, 03:39:04 PM »
AM wheat can be an enjoyable pounder when fresh and on a hot day. Otherwise, its pretty boring.
I can see some people saying this and I understand.  I am usually blown away by 'simple' while others find it boring.  I have some buds and family members who want and need everything that is new or different in their beer:  Sour, new hops and lots of them, brett, nutty new yeasts, belgian complexity, fruity character, etc.  Nothing wrong with that and it's a fascinating new (newish) part of our hobby.  Meanwhile I have pretty run-of-the-mill beers on tap here.  I had some buds over... he's a German-head and she is actually FROM Germany.  I told them "I have a nice helles on tap in the bar" and she winced, "Oh, I don't really like Helles" and my wife was drinking a beer I made for her (Amarillo & Citra Pale Ale) and my wife gave her a sip... that's what she wanted.  You just never know, ya know?  :P

I'm envisioning this American Wheat being consumed fresh and on a hot day so it should be pretty refreshing and poundable.

While I certainly enjoy some styles more than others, I have yet to perceive any well made beer as "boring".   ???

And I don't see American Wheat as strictly a summer beer.  I brew a lot of Stouts and Porters and it's nice to have a clean, palate cleanser on tap at the same time.

Offline nateo

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #32 on: March 05, 2021, 03:49:55 PM »
Any thoughts on using the dry Voss yeast in something like this? I haven't used it but it's supposed to be neutral to orangey, which could work. Maybe with some Mt Hood or something? I liked the Amarillo idea too.
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Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #33 on: March 05, 2021, 04:00:05 PM »
Any thoughts on using the dry Voss yeast in something like this? I haven't used it but it's supposed to be neutral to orangey, which could work. Maybe with some Mt Hood or something? I liked the Amarillo idea too.
I feel like it would be a good way to get a sense of the yeast because there isn't much else in the way. 
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Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #34 on: March 05, 2021, 04:37:25 PM »
While I certainly enjoy some styles more than others, I have yet to perceive any well made beer as "boring".   ???

And I don't see American Wheat as strictly a summer beer.  I brew a lot of Stouts and Porters and it's nice to have a clean, palate cleanser on tap at the same time.
For those who like more flavor, higher ABV, more modern hops and modern flavors, some old standards seem boring.  I don't necessarily see it that way as a simple, well-made beer can be very nice.  There have been a lot of conversations about Yuengling and how boring and bland it is but when it's fresh I really like it.  It's totally my kind of beer.  This American Wheat is similar... it will not knock your socks off but if it's well-made and fresh it should be a nice beer to have on tap. 
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Offline erockrph

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #35 on: March 05, 2021, 05:14:10 PM »
While I certainly enjoy some styles more than others, I have yet to perceive any well made beer as "boring".   ???

And I don't see American Wheat as strictly a summer beer.  I brew a lot of Stouts and Porters and it's nice to have a clean, palate cleanser on tap at the same time.
For those who like more flavor, higher ABV, more modern hops and modern flavors, some old standards seem boring.  I don't necessarily see it that way as a simple, well-made beer can be very nice.  There have been a lot of conversations about Yuengling and how boring and bland it is but when it's fresh I really like it.  It's totally my kind of beer.  This American Wheat is similar... it will not knock your socks off but if it's well-made and fresh it should be a nice beer to have on tap.
For me, it's more that there are other beers that fill the same niche that tend to be my go to (i.e., pale lagers). I would probably enjoy a well made Am Wheat, but I don't know if I see a "to-style" version of this making it into my rotation.

OTOH, I have a pack of OYL Sundew in the fridge that I was going to try out in a blond ale. Maybe I'll go with a wheat as the base beer instead.

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Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #36 on: March 05, 2021, 05:25:30 PM »
]For me, it's more that there are other beers that fill the same niche that tend to be my go to (i.e., pale lagers). I would probably enjoy a well made Am Wheat, but I don't know if I see a "to-style" version of this making it into my rotation.

OTOH, I have a pack of OYL Sundew in the fridge that I was going to try out in a blond ale. Maybe I'll go with a wheat as the base beer instead.
The Sundew is supposed to bring some strawberry & melon notes to the beer, right?  Could be a good application for it with a wheat-based beer.

I was over at my BIL's house and I left some Shiner Bock at his house.  Later we were on a zoom call and he told me that he had never had one so he tried one a couple days earlier.  He said, "I drank it.  It was fine.  I don't see myself drinking another one though".  :D  Beers like Negra Modelo, Indio, Shiner Bock, Dos Equis Amber are right up my alley.  I make beers in that style all the time but for some it's just not working and I suppose that's part of the fun.  When I envision a beer I want on tap, I am so happy that I am a brewer and can envision the beer, design the recipe and hopefully end up with what I originally envisioned.  In some cases there are no commercial versions of what I envisioned that I could just pick up at the store.   
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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #37 on: March 08, 2021, 03:54:06 PM »
The American Wheat does sound good. When I first got into craft beer I drank a lot of Goose Island 312 at Old Chicago. They always served it with a lemon, which was always very nice and refreshing. Now that warmer weather is coming, I kind of have a craving for that again. I also used to drink a lot of Oberon, not as much anymore, but I usually pick up at least one six pack every spring/summer when it comes out. Haven't had Goose Island 312 for a long time.

So beers I think of when I think of American wheat:
Goose Island 312
Bell's Oberon
Boulevard Wheat

Those pretty much nail it for me. Yeah, maybe they're boring to the average craft beer palate these days, but they are easy drinking and refreshing tasting beers on a hot ass summer day.
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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #38 on: March 08, 2021, 04:55:04 PM »
I like a well-made American wheat also! I think of a beer with relatively low bitterness, relatively clean yeast character, and maybe a touch of sweetness in the malt. It's a bit bland for some folks, I suppose, but I find the style to be a nice, approachable sipper when warm weather rolls around. Hangar 24 Brewing in Redlands, California, makes an absolutely delicious Orange Wheat Ale, which inspired me to make my own version (on tap right now!). I'll probably make another batch pretty soon, using oranges from a tree where I work. Gotta take advantage of local ingredients while they're available!
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Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #39 on: March 08, 2021, 05:33:22 PM »
The American Wheat does sound good. When I first got into craft beer I drank a lot of Goose Island 312 at Old Chicago. They always served it with a lemon, which was always very nice and refreshing. Now that warmer weather is coming, I kind of have a craving for that again. I also used to drink a lot of Oberon, not as much anymore, but I usually pick up at least one six pack every spring/summer when it comes out. Haven't had Goose Island 312 for a long time.

So beers I think of when I think of American wheat:
Goose Island 312
Bell's Oberon
Boulevard Wheat

Those pretty much nail it for me. Yeah, maybe they're boring to the average craft beer palate these days, but they are easy drinking and refreshing tasting beers on a hot ass summer day.

I like a well-made American wheat also! I think of a beer with relatively low bitterness, relatively clean yeast character, and maybe a touch of sweetness in the malt. It's a bit bland for some folks, I suppose, but I find the style to be a nice, approachable sipper when warm weather rolls around. Hangar 24 Brewing in Redlands, California, makes an absolutely delicious Orange Wheat Ale, which inspired me to make my own version (on tap right now!). I'll probably make another batch pretty soon, using oranges from a tree where I work. Gotta take advantage of local ingredients while they're available!

I am making this beer this weekend.  It is not going to be Widmer-like or Oberon-like but it will be gold, refreshing, probably clear and certainly adaptable to a lemon or orange slice.  It will be nice on a warm, sunny day for sure.  On the "boring" thing... I suppose all beers have their place.  Sometimes we have to see a beer for what it is instead of what it's not.  :P
« Last Edit: March 08, 2021, 05:35:07 PM by Village Taphouse »
Ken from Chicago

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #40 on: March 08, 2021, 05:46:54 PM »
  On the "boring" thing... I suppose all beers have their place.  Sometimes we have to see a beer for what it is instead of what it's not.  :P
Ken, I agree. I get so annoyed at people who think the only good beers are NEIPAs and beers with extreme flavors. It's the big thing right now. People think simple is equivalent to boring or bland. And sometimes it is, but if it's well made, like someone else mentioned, pretty much any style can be good. Within reason, of course :) I don't do pastry stouts or milkshake IPAs...just no. But there's a reason I homebrew - I make and drink what I like. Nothing else matters.
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Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #41 on: March 08, 2021, 05:58:57 PM »
  On the "boring" thing... I suppose all beers have their place.  Sometimes we have to see a beer for what it is instead of what it's not.  :P
Ken, I agree. I get so annoyed at people who think the only good beers are NEIPAs and beers with extreme flavors. It's the big thing right now. People think simple is equivalent to boring or bland. And sometimes it is, but if it's well made, like someone else mentioned, pretty much any style can be good. Within reason, of course :) I don't do pastry stouts or milkshake IPAs...just no. But there's a reason I homebrew - I make and drink what I like. Nothing else matters.
Right.  We have people on the extremes (as we do in politics, etc) where they only drink the coolest, latest, trendiest craft beers or else they never stray from Bud Light.  That's fine for them but I have to wonder about them a little bit.  Maybe it's my Midwest upbringing but simple works for me and my drinking session is generally not "one beer" and then I'm done.  So having a number of well-made 4.5 to 5% simple beers is nice and there can be a pretty wide range of beers in that group... ESBs, Pale Ales, Helles, Vienna Lager, Festbier, Pilsner, Marzen, Blonde Ale, Red Ale, Amber Lager or Ale, Bock, Dark Lager, Dunkel.  None of those are gimmicky, none of those are on the cutting edge of craft beer "coolness" and none of those are Bud Light.  :D
Ken from Chicago

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #42 on: March 08, 2021, 06:22:37 PM »
The American Wheat does sound good. When I first got into craft beer I drank a lot of Goose Island 312 at Old Chicago. They always served it with a lemon, which was always very nice and refreshing. Now that warmer weather is coming, I kind of have a craving for that again. I also used to drink a lot of Oberon, not as much anymore, but I usually pick up at least one six pack every spring/summer when it comes out. Haven't had Goose Island 312 for a long time.

So beers I think of when I think of American wheat:
Goose Island 312
Bell's Oberon
Boulevard Wheat

Those pretty much nail it for me. Yeah, maybe they're boring to the average craft beer palate these days, but they are easy drinking and refreshing tasting beers on a hot ass summer day.

I like a well-made American wheat also! I think of a beer with relatively low bitterness, relatively clean yeast character, and maybe a touch of sweetness in the malt. It's a bit bland for some folks, I suppose, but I find the style to be a nice, approachable sipper when warm weather rolls around. Hangar 24 Brewing in Redlands, California, makes an absolutely delicious Orange Wheat Ale, which inspired me to make my own version (on tap right now!). I'll probably make another batch pretty soon, using oranges from a tree where I work. Gotta take advantage of local ingredients while they're available!

I am making this beer this weekend. It is not going to be Widmer-like or Oberon-like but it will be gold, refreshing, probably clear and certainly adaptable to a lemon or orange slice.  It will be nice on a warm, sunny day for sure.  On the "boring" thing... I suppose all beers have their place.  Sometimes we have to see a beer for what it is instead of what it's not.  :P

Very interested to hear how you make out.  Your description is perfect, IMO.  Here's hoping you get exactly that.  (I have the ingredients for mine, but I've got a few others lined up first...won't be having a go until late May.)

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #43 on: March 08, 2021, 06:25:42 PM »
I find it interesting that people want a low bitterness beer for hot weather.  I'm exactly the opposite.  I find low bitterness beers cloying when it's hot.  I recall when I was studying for my BJCP exam years ago and had to drink a Bud to study it.  I decided to wait for a really hot day and enjoy it on my deck.  It was so sweet I just couldn't get it down.  This is not a value judgement, just an observation on varying tastes.
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Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #44 on: March 08, 2021, 06:43:27 PM »
I find it interesting that people want a low bitterness beer for hot weather.  I'm exactly the opposite.  I find low bitterness beers cloying when it's hot.  I recall when I was studying for my BJCP exam years ago and had to drink a Bud to study it.  I decided to wait for a really hot day and enjoy it on my deck.  It was so sweet I just couldn't get it down.  This is not a value judgement, just an observation on varying tastes.
The beers I make are not cloying and I do not care for sweet.  I like a beer that finishes dry.  It's hard to explain but a beer that is either high in bitterness or else high in late-hop additions starts to grind on me after a couple of beers.  Like my tastebuds are getting numb to all of that flavor.  These beers are also not a good pair for certain foods.  I generally like higher-hopped beers in the fall and winter and more straightforward, simple and refreshing beers in the spring and summer. 
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