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Author Topic: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?  (Read 11587 times)

Offline Megary

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #45 on: March 08, 2021, 12:53:36 pm »
I find it interesting that people want a low bitterness beer for hot weather.  I'm exactly the opposite.  I find low bitterness beers cloying when it's hot.  I recall when I was studying for my BJCP exam years ago and had to drink a Bud to study it.  I decided to wait for a really hot day and enjoy it on my deck.  It was so sweet I just couldn't get it down.  This is not a value judgement, just an observation on varying tastes.
1. When I think of American Wheat, the last thing that comes to mind is "cloying" or "sweet".  Possibly there could be a touch of grainy, maltiness to it, kind of a soft mouthfeel, but I would never describe it as sweet.  I'd call it dry - but not necessarily "crisp", if that makes sense.

2. There are many reasons why I could never get a Bud down.   :)

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #46 on: March 08, 2021, 12:57:59 pm »
I find it interesting that people want a low bitterness beer for hot weather.  I'm exactly the opposite.  I find low bitterness beers cloying when it's hot.  I recall when I was studying for my BJCP exam years ago and had to drink a Bud to study it.  I decided to wait for a really hot day and enjoy it on my deck.  It was so sweet I just couldn't get it down.  This is not a value judgement, just an observation on varying tastes.
1. When I think of American Wheat, the last thing that comes to mind is "cloying" or "sweet".  Possibly there could be a touch of grainy, maltiness to it, kind of a soft mouthfeel, but I would never describe it as sweet.  I'd call it dry - but not necessarily "crisp", if that makes sense.

2. There are many reasons why I could never get a Bud down.   :)
So much this.
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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #47 on: March 08, 2021, 01:01:19 pm »
I find it interesting that people want a low bitterness beer for hot weather.  I'm exactly the opposite.  I find low bitterness beers cloying when it's hot.  I recall when I was studying for my BJCP exam years ago and had to drink a Bud to study it.  I decided to wait for a really hot day and enjoy it on my deck.  It was so sweet I just couldn't get it down.  This is not a value judgement, just an observation on varying tastes.
1. When I think of American Wheat, the last thing that comes to mind is "cloying" or "sweet".  Possibly there could be a touch of grainy, maltiness to it, kind of a soft mouthfeel, but I would never describe it as sweet.  I'd call it dry - but not necessarily "crisp", if that makes sense.

2. There are many reasons why I could never get a Bud down.   :)

And that points out how perceptions differ.
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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #48 on: March 08, 2021, 01:22:07 pm »
On another board, I asked "what does Bud taste like?" because I have honestly not had one in so long that I don't remember.  Many of the responses from homebrewers was that it had a distinct green apple character (acetaldehyde?) which would kill me right away.  I admit to being out somewhere with people with a giant cooler and some good beer in there and then some BMC beer as well.  If I went into the cooler and only BMC beers were left I would drink Miller Lite or Coors or Coors Light before a Bud or Bud Light.  I did taste a Bud Light about 6-7 years ago.  It was so estery and absolutely gross.  Their ads call it 'crisp'.  No. 
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #49 on: March 08, 2021, 10:20:56 pm »
I don't mind American wheats but they aren't a go-to style for me. More likely to pluck a hefeweizen but I will confess to having consumed a fair amount of this style, too. Like all styles apparently, over time it became more of a wheat-heavy APA than a tempered yeast version of hefeweizen.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #50 on: March 09, 2021, 03:17:27 am »
I find it interesting that people want a low bitterness beer for hot weather.  I'm exactly the opposite.  I find low bitterness beers cloying when it's hot.  I recall when I was studying for my BJCP exam years ago and had to drink a Bud to study it.  I decided to wait for a really hot day and enjoy it on my deck.  It was so sweet I just couldn't get it down.  This is not a value judgement, just an observation on varying tastes.
1. When I think of American Wheat, the last thing that comes to mind is "cloying" or "sweet".  Possibly there could be a touch of grainy, maltiness to it, kind of a soft mouthfeel, but I would never describe it as sweet.  I'd call it dry - but not necessarily "crisp", if that makes sense.

2. There are many reasons why I could never get a Bud down.   :)
If you think Leinenkugel when you think of American Wheat, then I totally get the cloying/sweet thing. But when properly made, I wouldn't necessarily consider this style a "low-bitterness" beer. If it's well made, then it has light malt flavors balanced with the right amount of hops. Bud is 12 IBU, and I don't think I'd ever brew anything other than a sour that low in IBU. Mid 20's is a good ballpark to my palate to balance out a beer in this kind of style without getting in the way of the malt.

And for me, it's the ester profile of AB products that keep me from enjoying them, not the sweetness. (FYI - it's not acetaldehyde, it is an ester from their yeast strain that gives Bud that "green apple" character). I can put down a couple of Coors or PBR's if I need to, but I am hard pressed to finish even one can of Bud or Bud Light.
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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #51 on: March 09, 2021, 07:57:18 am »
If you think Leinenkugel when you think of American Wheat, then I totally get the cloying/sweet thing. But when properly made, I wouldn't necessarily consider this style a "low-bitterness" beer. If it's well made, then it has light malt flavors balanced with the right amount of hops. Bud is 12 IBU, and I don't think I'd ever brew anything other than a sour that low in IBU. Mid 20's is a good ballpark to my palate to balance out a beer in this kind of style without getting in the way of the malt.

And for me, it's the ester profile of AB products that keep me from enjoying them, not the sweetness. (FYI - it's not acetaldehyde, it is an ester from their yeast strain that gives Bud that "green apple" character). I can put down a couple of Coors or PBR's if I need to, but I am hard pressed to finish even one can of Bud or Bud Light.
For this particular beer, I'm aiming for around 24 IBUs.  Whether this is an American Wheat or not, I am planning on hopping it only once which is something I occasionally do for a number of styles.  That's not very "homebrewer-ish" but I like the character I get from it.  You get bitterness which offsets the sweetness of the malt but the finish is very smooth and drinkable because there are no late hops.  I also have to be careful of the water composition because I'll be using 1968 for this beer which is a notoriously low attenuater... 67-71%.  A beer with only one hop addition fermented with a low attenuater could be perilously close to being unbalanced (ending up sweet) which is why I made this beer around 24 IBUs instead of maybe 18-20.  I often add some amount of chloride to my mash and I still will but it will be slightly less because the grain bill and hop schedule (and yeast) will already be targeting that smooth, round, full character.  It's a bit of a balancing act especially with this yeast.  24 IBUs plus a lower amount of CaCl will hopefully crisp up the flavor of the beer.  I'm really looking forward to brewing it now.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2021, 07:58:59 am by Village Taphouse »
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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #52 on: March 09, 2021, 08:34:50 am »
Keep in mind when I talk about sweet that I don't care for helles because I generally find it too sweet. Just the way my tastebuds work.
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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #53 on: March 09, 2021, 09:01:26 am »
Keep in mind when I talk about sweet that I don't care for helles because I generally find it too sweet. Just the way my tastebuds work.
That's an interesting situation because when you read about how to brew helles it seems almost impossible to pull off.  It's supposed to be only pilsner malt (seems tricky), it's supposed to be very malty (how one might do that with only pilsner also seems tricky) and it's supposed to finish very dry.  That last one I could see with only pilsner.  My beers have been finishing around 1.008 so I am getting a dry finish but our tastebuds are all different so one never knows. 
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Offline beersk

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #54 on: March 09, 2021, 12:12:55 pm »
Keep in mind when I talk about sweet that I don't care for helles because I generally find it too sweet. Just the way my tastebuds work.
That's an interesting situation because when you read about how to brew helles it seems almost impossible to pull off.  It's supposed to be only pilsner malt (seems tricky), it's supposed to be very malty (how one might do that with only pilsner also seems tricky) and it's supposed to finish very dry.  That last one I could see with only pilsner.  My beers have been finishing around 1.008 so I am getting a dry finish but our tastebuds are all different so one never knows. 
Interesting. I've never heard that helles is supposed to be 100% pilsner malt. Maybe a century+ ago, but modern helles I think is brewed a different way, with some carahell or munich/vienna. There's no way, with German brewing practices, that Weihenstephaner is using 100% pils malt in their helles. It's, like, 4 SRM.
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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #55 on: March 09, 2021, 12:20:51 pm »
Keep in mind when I talk about sweet that I don't care for helles because I generally find it too sweet. Just the way my tastebuds work.
That's an interesting situation because when you read about how to brew helles it seems almost impossible to pull off.  It's supposed to be only pilsner malt (seems tricky), it's supposed to be very malty (how one might do that with only pilsner also seems tricky) and it's supposed to finish very dry.  That last one I could see with only pilsner.  My beers have been finishing around 1.008 so I am getting a dry finish but our tastebuds are all different so one never knows. 
Interesting. I've never heard that helles is supposed to be 100% pilsner malt. Maybe a century+ ago, but modern helles I think is brewed a different way, with some carahell or munich/vienna. There's no way, with German brewing practices, that Weihenstephaner is using 100% pils malt in their helles. It's, like, 4 SRM.
I agree with you.  When I make one it's typically got some carahell or vienna in it.  A number of articles I read mentioned the 100% pilsner thing but just because they say that doesn't mean we have to follow it.  Get to the finish line however you need to get there is something I have accepted lately.  It reminds me of that article where the journalist travels to somewhere in the Czech Republic and talks about this award-winning pilsner that has a burnished-gold color.  The journalist keeps asking the brewers how the beer got so much color and they don't want to tell him but eventually they spill it... they use some crystal malt in the beer.   :o 
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Offline erockrph

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #56 on: March 09, 2021, 12:34:53 pm »
Keep in mind when I talk about sweet that I don't care for helles because I generally find it too sweet. Just the way my tastebuds work.
That's an interesting situation because when you read about how to brew helles it seems almost impossible to pull off.  It's supposed to be only pilsner malt (seems tricky), it's supposed to be very malty (how one might do that with only pilsner also seems tricky) and it's supposed to finish very dry.  That last one I could see with only pilsner.  My beers have been finishing around 1.008 so I am getting a dry finish but our tastebuds are all different so one never knows. 
Interesting. I've never heard that helles is supposed to be 100% pilsner malt. Maybe a century+ ago, but modern helles I think is brewed a different way, with some carahell or munich/vienna. There's no way, with German brewing practices, that Weihenstephaner is using 100% pils malt in their helles. It's, like, 4 SRM.
I agree with you.  When I make one it's typically got some carahell or vienna in it.  A number of articles I read mentioned the 100% pilsner thing but just because they say that doesn't mean we have to follow it.  Get to the finish line however you need to get there is something I have accepted lately.  It reminds me of that article where the journalist travels to somewhere in the Czech Republic and talks about this award-winning pilsner that has a burnished-gold color.  The journalist keeps asking the brewers how the beer got so much color and they don't want to tell him but eventually they spill it... they use some crystal malt in the beer.   :o
I don't doubt that crystal/cara malt is used by some, but I wouldn't be surprised if a brewer like Weihenstephan or Paulaner uses a base malt that is custom-kilned to their specs to achieve a deeper flavor/color.
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #57 on: March 09, 2021, 02:07:21 pm »
The good news is that we shall have access to canned WO soon:

https://www.brewbound.com/news/weihenstephan-to-release-cans-in-2021/

Cheers!
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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #58 on: March 09, 2021, 02:20:37 pm »
The good news is that we shall have access to canned WO soon:

https://www.brewbound.com/news/weihenstephan-to-release-cans-in-2021/

Cheers!
Ooh, I need to look for that Helles.  That could be really nice.  I like the Paulaner Original Munich Lager too. 
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Offline Iliff Ave

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Re: What do you envision when you hear the term "American Wheat"?
« Reply #59 on: March 10, 2021, 07:44:13 am »
I'm toying with the idea of a wheat lager soon. My normal wheat has gotten a bit too clean and crisp for what I envision so might as well go all in. Planning to redesign the ale with a more characterful yeast and perhaps some munich malt
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