Author Topic: Indian Food  (Read 3140 times)

Offline fredthecat

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Re: Indian Food
« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2021, 01:10:34 AM »
just make a barbecued chicken tikka masala. a lot of effort but turned out well.

yeah indian food is labour intensive.

Offline pete b

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Re: Indian Food
« Reply #31 on: January 12, 2021, 01:40:39 AM »
just make a barbecued chicken tikka masala. a lot of effort but turned out well.

yeah indian food is labour intensive.
I find that being able to turn out some common side dishes in my sleep like raita, Dahl, and chapati/roti without needing recipes makes Indian cooking less intensive in that way. I made butter chicken for the first time a couple weeks ago and making sides without much thinking made it pretty easy to focus on the new recipe.
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Offline fredthecat

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Re: Indian Food
« Reply #32 on: January 12, 2021, 06:22:40 AM »
just make a barbecued chicken tikka masala. a lot of effort but turned out well.

yeah indian food is labour intensive.
I find that being able to turn out some common side dishes in my sleep like raita, Dahl, and chapati/roti without needing recipes makes Indian cooking less intensive in that way. I made butter chicken for the first time a couple weeks ago and making sides without much thinking made it pretty easy to focus on the new recipe.

yeah, i took the leftover marinade of yoghurt and spices and stuff and cooked eggs in it with extra crushed tomatoes. a decent very easy 2nd dish.

my kitchen is geared towards chinese/korean/japanese and european food though, so getting a full amount of indian items for example just isnt likely to happen. today was a one-off thing i think.

re: dahl, i dont like lentils and am sort of off beans overall for health beliefs.

i dont have a mixing machine, so while i can make any bread i dont because im too lazy to knead and clean up the sticky mess. my go-to indian flat bread is a dosa kind of thing fermented with yeast because its as easy as making simplified crepes.



Offline pete b

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Re: Indian Food
« Reply #33 on: January 12, 2021, 12:37:08 PM »
I actually don’t use my mixer for chapati or roti. Just mix the water and flour in a bowl, knead just for a couple minutes, rest, form balls, and roll. I like dosas too.
I know what you mean about taking on a new cuisine, it can get out of control having all the ingredients for everything. I keep having to find more room to store stuff. I have been working on my Chinese cooking the last couple of years and I still don’t have all the ingredients I would like to keep on hand.
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Offline pete b

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Re: Indian Food
« Reply #34 on: January 15, 2021, 12:43:35 AM »
I have been meaning to make onion pakoras and my wife happened to buy some gram flour for something else so I made pakoras and a cauliflower curry out of what was available in the fridge.

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Offline erockrph

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Re: Indian Food
« Reply #35 on: January 15, 2021, 02:17:54 AM »
The first time I tried onion pakoras was at an Indian wedding, and it blew my mind. Theirs were puffy, almost like a small onion clamcake or doughboy, and I realized that this was the perfect drunk food - a little sweet and a little salty.  I've never seen them in quite that style since, but I've never had a bad one.

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Offline pete b

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Re: Indian Food
« Reply #36 on: January 15, 2021, 12:30:43 PM »
The first time I tried onion pakoras was at an Indian wedding, and it blew my mind. Theirs were puffy, almost like a small onion clamcake or doughboy, and I realized that this was the perfect drunk food - a little sweet and a little salty.  I've never seen them in quite that style since, but I've never had a bad one.

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I think the puffy ones are called bajhi and have white flour and maybe egg which is why they are like clam fritters. Pakora  only have the liquid that salt coaxes out of the onion and are super crispy.
In the summer I make tons of zucchini fritters when zucchini is abundant in the garden the Italian way with egg, bread crumbs, and Parmesan. I discovered that bread crumbs instead of flour makes them fluffier and less doughy. Yes, all good drunk food. Or comfort food when the world has gone to hell.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2021, 12:53:39 PM by pete b »
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Indian Food
« Reply #37 on: January 16, 2021, 03:35:06 AM »
That would explain why I've never had a panoramic like that in a restaurant :) Although I will say that Indian food names, much like their food itself, is way more regional than you can tell from the handful of restaurants in my area. I'm pretty sure the person who told me they were called pakoras were from a different area than the caterers at that wedding.

That wedding, by the way, was one of the coolest cultural experiences I've ever had. The bride is Irish Catholic and the groom is Indian. The day started with a Catholic ceremony, followed by a buffet of Indian food in the church's basement prepared by the groom's family, followed by a traditional Hindi ceremony (they had a leaflet explaining the ceremony for each guest and repeated everything in English). Then there were Indian passed hors d'oeuvres, and a mix of Indian and typical American food at the various stations for dinner. Everything felt very inclusive, and I had some great conversations with many Indian guests who freely shared their culture and traditions.

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Offline pete b

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Re: Indian Food
« Reply #38 on: April 17, 2021, 10:59:14 PM »
I had some duck breast to use for supper tonight but was in the mood for something spicy so went with Indian.  I made a Punjabi style sauce generally used for chicken,  a black pepper and chili pepper Dahl and coconut green beanx.

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