Author Topic: Moose stew with stout and root vegetables  (Read 384 times)

Offline mdyer909

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 78
Moose stew with stout and root vegetables
« on: March 16, 2021, 10:32:41 PM »
Lamb stew with stout is probably more traditional for St. Patrick’s Day, but I had no lamb, but I did have some moose meat given to me.

2# moose stew meat
1 big onion
4 garlic cloves
2 big carrots
2 parsnips
1/2 rutabaga
2 medium red potatoes
2 cups beef broth
12 oz stout

Toss that stew meat with flour salt and pepper.  Brown it up nice in a frypan and toss it in the crockpot.  Deglaze that pan with some of the stock and toss it in.  Cook the onion and garlic in the pan till done to your liking.  Deglaze again.  Chop up your roots and into the pot they go.  Put in the rest of the stock, the stout, a bay leaf, teaspoon of caraway and some herbs (I used Penzey’s Bouquet Garni blend) and cook on low for 8 hours.  Really good. 

Offline fredthecat

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 602
Re: Moose stew with stout and root vegetables
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2021, 04:18:19 PM »
nice, how does moose taste?

Offline mdyer909

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 78
Re: Moose stew with stout and root vegetables
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2021, 01:17:33 PM »
nice, how does moose taste?

I think you’d be hard pressed to tell it apart from venison.  I don’t think either moose or venison taste “gamey”, but my wife won’t eat either, nor lamb for that matter.  I wonder if it’s like the “soapy” thing with cilantro. 

Offline erockrph

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6990
  • Chepachet, RI
    • The Hop WHisperer
Re: Moose stew with stout and root vegetables
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2021, 04:40:51 PM »
nice, how does moose taste?

I think you’d be hard pressed to tell it apart from venison.  I don’t think either moose or venison taste “gamey”, but my wife won’t eat either, nor lamb for that matter.  I wonder if it’s like the “soapy” thing with cilantro.
"Gamey" wild game is from older animals and mediocre butchering in my experience. I've never had gamey meat from a young doe, but older bucks can get a little gamey, especially if not prepared well. I've never gotten any gaminess from farm raised game animals, either.

I've only had moose in chili, but I've been told it's the best tasting cervid. I've heard the same about caribou, though so take that for what it's worth.

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline Saccharomyces

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 903
  • Deus ex machina
Re: Moose stew with stout and root vegetables
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2021, 05:40:10 PM »
"Gamey" wild game is from older animals and mediocre butchering in my experience. I've never had gamey meat from a young doe, but older bucks can get a little gamey, especially if not prepared well. I've never gotten any gaminess from farm raised game animals, either.

I've only had moose in chili, but I've been told it's the best tasting cervid. I've heard the same about caribou, though so take that for what it's worth.

From personal experience, a lot of the "gamey" flavor does come poor field dressing and butchering, not to mention poorly placed shots that end up tainting the meat.  However, a good bit of the flavor comes from whatever the deer are eating.  A deer that has been chowing down on white oak acorns for a while tends to taste different than one who has been chowing down on a farmer's alfalfa field.  While I no longer hunt, I would always setup near a large white oak or a white oak stand that had dropped a large mast crop.  White oak acorns are like deer crack.   
« Last Edit: April 01, 2021, 12:54:05 AM by Saccharomyces »