Author Topic: brewing application etiquette  (Read 3401 times)

Offline majorvices

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #30 on: September 09, 2010, 01:21:28 PM »
Quote from: euge
link=topic=3667.msg41726#msg41726 date=1284055255

Most importantly, bring some humility along to back up that bravado.

This is really all I was saying. That, and brewing small scale doesn't necessarily compare to brewing larger scale. Don't expect to walk in there and run the place because you brew kick ass homebrew. Start at the bottom. Because no matter how good a brewer you are you probably don't know jack about running a professional brewery. I'm just starting up as a pro-brewer, and I am amazed at how much I still have to learn.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2010, 01:26:00 PM by majorvices »
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Offline majorvices

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #31 on: September 09, 2010, 01:44:40 PM »
I guess people just have different images of the type of job they're applying for.  When one of the local brewpubs lost the brewer a few years back (he moved) they put out a call for applications, no professional brewing experience necessary, they would hire homebrewers.  I would certainly expect those applicants with no history to bring samples.

If I was the head brewer and a homebrewer was applying for the assistant brewer position (which is the bottom rung at most of the breweries in my area, if the head brewer is fortunate enough to even have an assistant) I would want to sample their beer and talk to them about their process, see if they could critically evaluate their own beer.  You can tell if someone has at least some clue about sanitization if you taste their beer - if they bring you a sample that is clearly infected you know first, that they screwed up the process somewhere along the way, and second that they don't have a half decent palette if they are sharing this with anyone except as an example of what not to do or asking what went wrong.

Brewing can be taught, so can cleaning so I wouldn't require an applicant be a homebrewer or have experience brewing.  You obviously want a hard worker and someone who takes pride in their work and wants to do the best they can.  It also helps if they like beer and are interested in the process, and those types of people will probably have at least tried to brew at home.  I think there are good reasons for bringing a sample, and if there are a slew of applicants it is something that can set one apart.

And Keith, just because I bring you a sample doesn't mean I expect you to brew it.  Who says I'd even give you the recipe? ;)  It also doesn't mean that I think my beer is better than yours, and if someone came in with that attitude then don't hire them (unless they're right, then maybe you should think about it).  To me it's just about sharing a beer and a love of beer, and if a homebrewer doesn't want to share their beer then it seems to me it probably isn't very good and they're not interested in making it better.

But that's just me.

Tom. I agree with you - if the brewer has a call for applicants - absolutely bring beer! I took it to mean a "cold call" on the brewery owner from the OP. In that case, no, I probably would not bring beer to the first meeting but would do as I mentioned above. You work for the place a week or two, help huff a few kegs in and out of the cold room, and people will be dying to try your beer.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2010, 01:48:29 PM by majorvices »
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #32 on: September 09, 2010, 03:28:18 PM »
Tom. I agree with you - if the brewer has a call for applicants - absolutely bring beer! I took it to mean a "cold call" on the brewery owner from the OP. In that case, no, I probably would not bring beer to the first meeting but would do as I mentioned above. You work for the place a week or two, help huff a few kegs in and out of the cold room, and people will be dying to try your beer.
I figured we'd agree when we talked in enough detail to know we were talking about the same thing.  Because if it's a cold call like you're picturing then bringing beer and expecting them to drool is probably going to be the wrong attitude for most people.  If you're showing up at the door uninvited and unknown then your work ethic should be front and foremost, not your beer, IMO.
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Offline wfaris

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #33 on: September 09, 2010, 03:31:05 PM »
A few years ago out in Boulder, Colorado I met one of the assistant brewers of one of the smaller breweries there.  In the process of sampling a few beers with him I found out that they would be looking for another assistant brewer soon.  As I was somewhat interested in applying I asked if I could get a tour of the place, not telling him that I was thinking of applying.  When I showed up at the brewery the next day he apologized and said he really didn't have time to do a tour since they had an unexpected deadline to get a bunch of beer packaged.  He then asked if I wanted to help on the bottling line and we could talk while working.

That couple of hours of volunteer work was quite informative.  I found out the usual stuff, history, types of beers they make, general process, etc.  In addition, and more important, the approach the head brewer had to brewing, water treatment, yeast handling, recipe development and such.  Also I learned from the other brewers what it was like to work for the guy.  

Basically, I interviewed the brewery and determined that I did not want to work for them even though the other brewers encouraged me to apply for the job.  Doing this type of research on the workplace can be just as important as how you handle yourself when they interview you.  There is an old saying, "Be careful of what you wish for..."

Wayne
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #34 on: September 09, 2010, 03:33:44 PM »
Basically, I interviewed the brewery and determined that I did not want to work for them even though the other brewers encouraged me to apply for the job.  Doing this type of research on the workplace can be just as important as how you handle yourself when they interview you.  There is an old saying, "Be careful of what you wish for..."
I totally agree Wayne, no matter what type of job you are applying for.  When you go for an interview, remember to interview them as well to find out if it is the type of place you'd like to work.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline MrNate

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #35 on: September 09, 2010, 04:38:12 PM »
3 pages and nobody mentioned how critical it is to not wear pants? What is this forum coming to?
“If one's actions are honest, one does not need the predated confidence of others, only their rational perception.”

Offline violaleebrews

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #36 on: September 09, 2010, 06:55:02 PM »
awesome!  you guys just made my aha membership worthwhile!  thanks to all those who replied with regards to my question.

for the record, i wasn't expecting any headbrewer to give a damn about my recipies, i just want to be able to show them that i know what i'm doing on my own.  also, i wouldn't apply to a brewery and expect to be above any of the crew who has been breaking their backs for months or years before me.  any large or small brewery with any credibility has a head brewer who know his stuff and isn't looking to me for answers.  i'm only looking to be a part of the process.  I LOVE BREWING!  right now i'm a part of the process of making dental cabinetry!  woohoo!  yeah... not very exciting.  being some part, as integral as it may be, of the brewing process is more appealing to me than what i'm doing right now.  i know to come in to the interview with humility and it's always good to be reminded.  i have already taken some vacation days from my current job to work for free with one of the local brewers just to learn because i love brewing and everything about it, even the cleaning and more cleaning... and more cleaning.

so, it sounds like my wife had some good advice by bringing some brews just in case there is an outside chance that they might come into play. 

i'd rather have them and not need them than need them and not have them.

thanks again, and keep on brewing!

cheers

JT

Offline rabid_dingo

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #37 on: September 09, 2010, 08:24:49 PM »
3 pages and nobody mentioned how critical it is to not wear pants? What is this forum coming to?

Aaaaaah LOL...How did we miss this?!?!
Ruben * Colorado :)

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #38 on: September 09, 2010, 08:25:40 PM »
3 pages and nobody mentioned how critical it is to not wear pants? What is this forum coming to?

Aaaaaah LOL...How did we miss this?!?!
I think it was just a given . . .
Tom Schmidlin

Offline majorvices

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #39 on: September 10, 2010, 05:05:41 AM »

so, it sounds like my wife had some good advice by bringing some brews just in case there is an outside chance that they might come into play. 

i'd rather have them and not need them than need them and not have them.



I totally agree and guess I just misunderstood your intention from the beginning. If you are actually going to an interview bring some beers along, and leave them in the car in case it comes up. Which it very well might.
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Offline violaleebrews

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #40 on: September 11, 2010, 06:14:28 AM »
my wife is full of wisdom.  she's like Buddha.  still not sure why she married me.    ;) 

she'll also make sure that i'm wearing pants!

Offline majorvices

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #41 on: September 11, 2010, 06:16:28 AM »
What a catch!  ;) Good luck with your endeavor!
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Offline chriskennedy

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Re: brewing application etiquette
« Reply #42 on: September 13, 2010, 09:08:18 AM »
Don't bring beer if it sucks.  If your beer rocks, I can't imagine that EVER hurting you, and I can definitely imagine it helping you.  If a brewery doesn't hire you because you brought them good homebrew, you definitely do not want to work for them anyway.

I got my first brewing gig based on a liquid resume. 

But seriously, be pretty sure that your beer is good before you bring it to a brewer hoping to get a job.