Author Topic: Acetaldehyde in Lagers  (Read 645 times)

Offline denny

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Re: Acetaldehyde in Lagers
« Reply #30 on: April 26, 2021, 02:34:30 PM »
There's always the chance I'm just tasting something different, and it's not acetaldehyde. But, that's my best guess. Fits the descriptors perfectly. Whatever it is is certainly not welcomed in my lagers!  ;D

For $30, you could get it tested.

https://oregonbrewlab.com/products/#offflavor

If it's really driving you nuts, it might be worth it.

If I already know a certain off-flavor is in my beer, then wouldn't these off-flavor tests just be telling me what I already know?

I see the tests as confirming that what you think you know is correct.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Acetaldehyde in Lagers
« Reply #31 on: April 26, 2021, 03:01:03 PM »
Wyeast 2308 Munich Lager pitched at proper rate after starter

Whats the "proper rate"?
Has this rate been verified with a scope and a count? If using a online calculator, I have found them from mildly to wildly inaccurate (but not one right). This is from scoping and actually counting.

I've found the MR Malty calculator to be actually pretty accurate compared to cell counts I did in my brewery. In fact I had a new lab guy at one point in time who had horrible math and I used to the Mr Malty to double check his calculations. Obviously you can't tell viability but if you know the yeast is healthy and fresh you should get pretty close.

Offline Homebrew_kev

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Re: Acetaldehyde in Lagers
« Reply #32 on: April 26, 2021, 04:16:15 PM »
Any detectives out there who can spot what might be causing this? This is just one of about five lagers I've tried, some with different yeast, and they've all had acetaldehyde. I am at my wits end.

Sounds like oxidation to me. I'd check o2 exposure when cold crashing in regards to suck back. Also, when kegging - do a closed transfer if you can. If you can't, purge the keg with co2, then siphon in the beer (with the lid open) while pushing co2 in the gas post at a very low psi - close it up, and purge 3 more times.

Offline majorvices

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Re: Acetaldehyde in Lagers
« Reply #33 on: April 26, 2021, 06:20:50 PM »
One of the things I have been doing to avoid "suck back" is to fill a collapsable bag with Co2 and attaching it to the blow off. Theoretically you should be able to attach it like a blow off to capture Co2. Then, when the beer cold crashes it just sucks back in the Co2 from the bag.


Here's the bag I have ben using (they have 1 gallon sized bags too)

https://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=122655

Here's the valve that works on them

https://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=136411

Offline denny

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Re: Acetaldehyde in Lagers
« Reply #34 on: April 26, 2021, 07:09:30 PM »
One of the things I have been doing to avoid "suck back" is to fill a collapsable bag with Co2 and attaching it to the blow off. Theoretically you should be able to attach it like a blow off to capture Co2. Then, when the beer cold crashes it just sucks back in the Co2 from the bag.


Here's the bag I have ben using (they have 1 gallon sized bags too)

https://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=122655

Here's the valve that works on them

https://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=136411

I use the Grainfather pressure kit to pressurize the fermenter when I cold crash.  But I only have one of those.  If I have more than one going, I simply seal the other fermenters.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell