Author Topic: How to tell what kind of hops I have grown?  (Read 2903 times)

Offline ben51781

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How to tell what kind of hops I have grown?
« on: September 09, 2010, 08:26:57 PM »
I recently discovered several giant vines of hops growing in my backyard.  I believe the previous owner of my home planted them because the vines are huge and the hops are very mature.  I have never brewed my own beer but always been interested in trying.  Now that I have about two pounds of hops to harvest I plan to give it a shot.  Question is, how can I tell what kind of hops I have?

Thanks!

Offline tschmidlin

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Re: How to tell what kind of hops I have grown?
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2010, 08:29:39 PM »
Hop identification can be really tough.  Do you have any way of contacting the old owner to ask?  That's your best bet for a cheap and easy positive identification, otherwise you're really just guessing.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: How to tell what kind of hops I have grown?
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2010, 05:32:20 AM »
Tom is right, it is hard to tell which is which.  You can't go by the leaves, as the same plant will have leaves with 0 to 5 lobes.  The cones vary in size on the same plant.  Someone who has worked in the industry their entire career might be able to narrow it down to a few varieties. 

The experts rely on DNA testing these days.  That is how they know that CTZ are all the same (Columbus, Tomahawk, Zeus).

This talks of the difficulty in telling what Wild Hops are.
http://www.gorstvalleyhops.com/pdfs/July_09.pdf
Jeff Rankert
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Offline majorvices

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Re: How to tell what kind of hops I have grown?
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2010, 05:39:06 AM »
If it were me I would pick them, dry them and vacuum pack them them put them in the freezer. Then I would go pick up a copy of "How to Brew" by John Palmer and learn about the brewing process. Then pick up a homebrew kit from you local homebrew shop or an online source. You would be better off starting with commercial hops because you will know what to expect but my guess is what you have will be great for a big IPA or other American hoppy ale after you have few batches under your belt. Use the copiously in the last 10 minutes of the boil, or during flame out, for best use.
Keith Y.

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Offline rbclay

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Re: How to tell what kind of hops I have grown?
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2010, 02:34:17 PM »
Where do you live? If you are anywhere near me I will help you out! I'll show you how to brew and use your homegrown hops to boot! If you harvest them please read about drying them. Very important for long term storage.
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Offline Pawtucket Patriot

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Re: How to tell what kind of hops I have grown?
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2010, 05:09:39 AM »
If it were me I would pick them, dry them and vacuum pack them them put them in the freezer. Then I would go pick up a copy of "How to Brew" by John Palmer and learn about the brewing process. Then pick up a homebrew kit from you local homebrew shop or an online source. You would be better off starting with commercial hops because you will know what to expect but my guess is what you have will be great for a big IPA or other American hoppy ale after you have few batches under your belt. Use the copiously in the last 10 minutes of the boil, or during flame out, for best use.

+1

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