Author Topic: American Barleywine, comments appreciated  (Read 1114 times)

Offline Megary

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 535
American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« on: May 19, 2021, 06:01:02 PM »
I need to order up some ingredients for a mid-June American Barleywine brewday.  Before I waste any $ on useless ingredients, I thought I'd see if anything jumps out at you all.

Any glaring mistakes here?  I'll be looking for a modest malt presence, a bitter, hoppy, winter sipper.  I'm hoping the sugar and the long, low mash will help the yeast dry this out a bit and keep it from becoming a malt bomb.

Batch Size - 2.5gal (into fermenter)
OG ≈ 1.095
FG ≈ 1.025
ABV ≈ 9 - 9.5
SRM ≈ 13 - 15

79% American 2-Row
11% Dark Munich
8% Corn Sugar
2% C120

80 IBU's Chinook @60
1oz Idaho 7 @0
1oz Loral @0

2 packs BRY-97
Yeast nutrient in the boil

Mash - 90 minutes at 148°
Boil - 90 minutes

Bottle to ≈ 2.25 volumes.

Set 'em and forget 'em for 6 months.

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 24153
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2021, 06:26:09 PM »
I don't think I'd use the sugar.  That's more for a tripel IPA kinda thing IMO. For comparison, here's one that's won me some awardswon.  A 5 year old version took 1st place at the OR State fair...https://www.experimentalbrew.com/recipes/dennys-old-stoner-barleywine
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline Megary

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 535
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2021, 07:21:21 PM »
I don't think I'd use the sugar.  That's more for a tripel IPA kinda thing IMO. For comparison, here's one that's won me some awardswon.  A 5 year old version took 1st place at the OR State fair...https://www.experimentalbrew.com/recipes/dennys-old-stoner-barleywine

Thanks, Denny.

I definitely see your point about the use of the sugar pushing this towards an Imperial IPA.  The styles are practically brothers as it is.

My reasoning for the sugar is a) to keep the beer from becoming too malty and 2) given my BIAB process and probable decreased mash efficiency, provide some low hanging fruit for my gravity points.  But I will definitely give the sugar addition another look.

I'd prefer not to use extract as I feel that will just add to the "maltiness" of the finished beer.  I want some malt presence, but not overly so.  If that makes sense.

To be honest, I'm not sure what to expect as far as conversion and attenuation.  I'm preparing myself for a wide range of outcomes.  :)

Offline dannyjed

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1363
  • Toledo, OH
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2021, 10:50:19 PM »
I agree with Denny. No need for sugar because a Barleywine is supposed to have a full mouthfeel. I always make a 1.050 beer and use the entire yeast cake for the Barleywine. I see your brewing a smaller batch, so 2 packs should be plenty.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Dan Chisholm

Offline Drewch

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 231
  • Just this guy, you know?
    • The Malt Bug
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2021, 10:53:06 PM »
A darker sugar than just corn sugar might be more "on-style".  Even just turbinado or something like that.
The Other Drew

The Malt Bug Homebrewery - brasserie, cidrerie, hydromellerie - since 2019.

Offline fredthecat

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 667
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2021, 03:44:04 AM »
A darker sugar than just corn sugar might be more "on-style".  Even just turbinado or something like that.

im drinking a beer right now i made with 1lb of turbinado per 5gallons, and it is very enjoyable. not ready yet to get into perceptions about it, but it will at least be a good sugar.

though, as was said above, definitely consider all malt or at least less sugar. it does change the feel of it.

Offline Megary

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 535
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2021, 10:01:38 AM »
Good stuff everyone, thanks.

So if I drop the sugar, what would be the best steps to take to make sure this beer doesn’t come out too malty?

Mash low
Pitch lots of yeast

While I would like a malt presence, I’m not looking for syrup, as some Barleywines tend to be.  Maybe my issue is that I’m not really looking for a Barleywine?? I’d accept that.

Offline Drewch

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 231
  • Just this guy, you know?
    • The Malt Bug
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2021, 04:03:32 PM »
...Maybe my issue is that I’m not really looking for a Barleywine?? I’d accept that.

There's definitely a continuum of dark British-derived beers.  Maybe just scale it back into an Old Ale or strong Brown Ale...  Or keep the sugar in to lighten the body.  Do a parti gyle and blend your runnings to a couple of different OGs (including maybe one boosted with turbinado or a dark syrup) and run three batches (big OG, big OG with sugar, smaller OG) in parallel and see what you like best.
The Other Drew

The Malt Bug Homebrewery - brasserie, cidrerie, hydromellerie - since 2019.

Offline erockrph

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 7088
  • Chepachet, RI
    • The Hop WHisperer
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2021, 04:09:16 PM »


Good stuff everyone, thanks.

So if I drop the sugar, what would be the best steps to take to make sure this beer doesn’t come out too malty?

Mash low
Pitch lots of yeast

While I would like a malt presence, I’m not looking for syrup, as some Barleywines tend to be.  Maybe my issue is that I’m not really looking for a Barleywine?? I’d accept that.

I think you're onto something there. Barleywine is supposed to be big and malty. You might be looking more for a big DIPA instead.

That being said, I think that style names are more semantics than anything else. If you can picture the beer you want in your head, then brew that beer rather than trying to shoehorn something into a particular style.

If you want a less chewy/syrupy beer, then either add sugar, mash low and long, or both. Pitch a lot of healthy yeast and oxygenate well.

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 24153
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #9 on: May 20, 2021, 04:49:06 PM »
A darker sugar than just corn sugar might be more "on-style".  Even just turbinado or something like that.

Not usually in American style.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 24153
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2021, 04:51:22 PM »
Good stuff everyone, thanks.

So if I drop the sugar, what would be the best steps to take to make sure this beer doesn’t come out too malty?

Mash low
Pitch lots of yeast

While I would like a malt presence, I’m not looking for syrup, as some Barleywines tend to be.  Maybe my issue is that I’m not really looking for a Barleywine?? I’d accept that.

More hops.  My model ismRogue Old Crustacean, which comes in at 130 IBU.  Likely only calculated, bbut ot,dpesnt matter because it works.  And it's BW....it's supposed to be malty!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 24153
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #11 on: May 20, 2021, 04:52:08 PM »


Good stuff everyone, thanks.

So if I drop the sugar, what would be the best steps to take to make sure this beer doesn’t come out too malty?

Mash low
Pitch lots of yeast

While I would like a malt presence, I’m not looking for syrup, as some Barleywines tend to be.  Maybe my issue is that I’m not really looking for a Barleywine?? I’d accept that.

I think you're onto something there. Barleywine is supposed to be big and malty. You might be looking more for a big DIPA instead.

That being said, I think that style names are more semantics than anything else. If you can picture the beer you want in your head, then brew that beer rather than trying to shoehorn something into a particular style.

If you want a less chewy/syrupy beer, then either add sugar, mash low and long, or both. Pitch a lot of healthy yeast and oxygenate well.

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

Obvious solution is to make it more bitter.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline Iliff Ave

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 4069
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #12 on: May 20, 2021, 05:15:27 PM »
Looks like you're going in a different direction but I like the original recipe a lot
On Tap/Bottled: IPL, Kolsch, bitter, Czech pils

Fermenting:
Up Next: amber lager, Italian pils

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 24153
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • Dennybrew
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #13 on: May 20, 2021, 05:30:49 PM »
I need to order up some ingredients for a mid-June American Barleywine brewday.  Before I waste any $ on useless ingredients, I thought I'd see if anything jumps out at you all.

Any glaring mistakes here?  I'll be looking for a modest malt presence, a bitter, hoppy, winter sipper.  I'm hoping the sugar and the long, low mash will help the yeast dry this out a bit and keep it from becoming a malt bomb.

Batch Size - 2.5gal (into fermenter)
OG ≈ 1.095
FG ≈ 1.025
ABV ≈ 9 - 9.5
SRM ≈ 13 - 15

79% American 2-Row
11% Dark Munich
8% Corn Sugar
2% C120

80 IBU's Chinook @60
1oz Idaho 7 @0
1oz Loral @0

2 packs BRY-97
Yeast nutrient in the boil

Mash - 90 minutes at 148°
Boil - 90 minutes

Bottle to ≈ 2.25 volumes.

Set 'em and forget 'em for 6 months.

Have you had a BW like you want to brew that you could use as a model?
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline fredthecat

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 667
Re: American Barleywine, comments appreciated
« Reply #14 on: May 20, 2021, 05:47:14 PM »


Good stuff everyone, thanks.

So if I drop the sugar, what would be the best steps to take to make sure this beer doesn’t come out too malty?

Mash low
Pitch lots of yeast

While I would like a malt presence, I’m not looking for syrup, as some Barleywines tend to be.  Maybe my issue is that I’m not really looking for a Barleywine?? I’d accept that.

I think you're onto something there. Barleywine is supposed to be big and malty. You might be looking more for a big DIPA instead.

That being said, I think that style names are more semantics than anything else. If you can picture the beer you want in your head, then brew that beer rather than trying to shoehorn something into a particular style.

If you want a less chewy/syrupy beer, then either add sugar, mash low and long, or both. Pitch a lot of healthy yeast and oxygenate well.

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

Obvious solution is to make it more bitter.


for a long time I've had an idea that i heard early on fixed in my head.

That the human tongue can "max out" on the perceptible sensation of bitterness at about 90 IBU.

I am starting to have an inkling that this isn't true.

Any thoughts?