Author Topic: kegging problem  (Read 371 times)

Offline James Yuells

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kegging problem
« on: June 24, 2021, 11:11:24 pm »
I'm new at kegging.

I kegged a batch, which I had dry hopped. When I tried to tap the keg, nothing happened. I think the hops might have clogged the dip tube. I'm going to depressurize the keg, clean out the tube, and trim it by about an inch. Does this sound like a good course of action? Could it be some other problem?

Let me know

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: kegging problem
« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2021, 11:17:17 pm »
So the beer is carbed and connected to a CO2 tank and the tank is on but there are hop pellets on the bottom of the keg?  When you say "nothing happened", did you feel like there was something that happened (like you got a bit of pressure first and THEN everything stopped?) or literally nothing?  I don't add hops to my kegs so this is out of my experience but I have had my beer lines come too close to the capillaries on the back of the serving fridge and actually cause a small frozen spot in the beer line.  I know that it's not a CO2 issue because that happens over time and I know it's not an empty keg situation because that usually results in a yeasty blowout.  Shortening the dip tube sounds fine especially if you plan to do this a lot but the other thing you could do is place the hops in a muslin bag so they're contained and you could also tie a piece of thread to the bag and run it up through the hatch so it won't sink.  That would keep your diptube opening clear.  Even if you shorten the dip tube, loose pellets in the keg are going to find their way in there. 
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

Offline Megary

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Re: kegging problem
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2021, 11:31:45 pm »
+1

And if hops found their way into the dip tube, I would strongly recommend cleaning the “Out” post.   Very likely to be plugged as well.

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: kegging problem
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2021, 11:49:10 pm »
Another thought is to DH the beer while still in the fermenter (I would still use a muslin bag) and then transfer the beer to the keg.  The less solid material in the keg the better.  But I'm not a hophead (for the most part) so that solution may not provide you with the ROBUST hop character you're looking for. 
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

Offline pete b

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Re: kegging problem
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2021, 12:39:54 am »
If it’s not too late try the least invasive procedures first. You can switch the gas line to the out post and blast 30 psi for several seconds through there. This can blow any material in the dip tube as well as what is likely stuck in the poppet valve in the post back into the keg. This is good to do in the morning, then let it rest all day for everything to settle and try pouring at night. If this works you haven’t added oxygen to your beer.
I do recommend cutting an inch off your dip tube, it definitely helps with this problem.
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Offline HopDen

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Re: kegging problem
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2021, 01:00:26 am »
I'm new at kegging.

I kegged a batch, which I had dry hopped. When I tried to tap the keg, nothing happened. I think the hops might have clogged the dip tube. I'm going to depressurize the keg, clean out the tube, and trim it by about an inch. Does this sound like a good course of action? Could it be some other problem?

Let me know


Look into these. I have used them in my kegs when dry hopping and they work very well. Either transfer off of hops or leave intact whilst drinking. Obviously this is for the next time you dry hop.
https://shop.theelectricbrewery.com/collections/hop-stopper
« Last Edit: June 25, 2021, 01:02:40 am by HopDen »

Offline Village Taphouse

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Re: kegging problem
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2021, 01:02:39 am »
I'm new at kegging.

I kegged a batch, which I had dry hopped. When I tried to tap the keg, nothing happened. I think the hops might have clogged the dip tube. I'm going to depressurize the keg, clean out the tube, and trim it by about an inch. Does this sound like a good course of action? Could it be some other problem?

Let me know



Look into these. I have used them in my kegs when dry hopping and they work very well. Either transfer off of hops or leave intact whilst drinking.
https://shop.theelectricbrewery.com/collections/hop-stopper
Oh yeah.  There is always the "floating diptube" thing too.  You connect a plastic tube to the bottom of your diptube and then the intake floats high above the bottom of the keg so everything at the bottom stays right there.  I do not use them but I know some people who do.  If you plan to use hops in your keg this could be a good way to go.  The good news is that there have been many in your shoes and a bunch of good ideas await you here. 
Ken from Chicago. 
A day without beer is like... just kidding, I have no idea.

Offline majorvices

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Re: kegging problem
« Reply #7 on: June 25, 2021, 01:21:22 am »
Without some sort of screen on the post or hops enclosed in a bag I have never had any luck dry hopping in kegs. They get stuck in the poppets and beer won't flow.

Oh yeah, you can zip tie the bag around the dip tube and let the hops free float in the keg. That works.

Offline spurviance

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