Author Topic: Why not ferment in the Boiling Vessel?  (Read 1694 times)

Offline BeerfanOz

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 71
Re: Why not ferment in the Boiling Vessel?
« Reply #15 on: July 06, 2021, 04:48:54 pm »
One of the guys in our brew club does this with his kviek beers in his robobrew. Once it’s cool, set temp to 38c then pitch. I don’t think he does it with other styles, just the kviek ones. He’s had no issues at all
Shellharbour, NSW, Australia

Offline Drewch

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 389
  • Just this guy, you know?
Re: Why not ferment in the Boiling Vessel?
« Reply #16 on: July 06, 2021, 06:34:52 pm »
Hmm. If you had a keggle with a spunding valve and a floating dip tube, you could mash, boil, ferment, condition, and serve from the same vessel.
The Other Drew

Home fermentations since 2019.

Offline narcout

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2151
  • Los Angeles, CA
Re: Why not ferment in the Boiling Vessel?
« Reply #17 on: July 09, 2021, 04:26:25 pm »
Once fermentation ends and that positive pressure goes away, you will get oxygen ingress, as you are not in a sealed fermenter. You'd want to monitor that gravity closely and transfer as soon as it's stable.

I don't think it's much of a problem for the OP's plan, but positive CO2 pressure doesn't keep oxygen out of a imperfectly sealed vessel.  Consider that even a capped bottle of carbonated beer is subject to slow oxygen ingress through the sealing insert of the crown cap.
Sometimes you just can't get enough - JAMC

Offline BrewNerd

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 74
Re: Why not ferment in the Boiling Vessel?
« Reply #18 on: September 01, 2021, 07:49:05 am »
Sounds like it all comes down to a good enough seal and the willingness to sacrifice your boil pot for a few more days.

Slightly less cleaning, too. I like that.

Isn't this the basic idea behind the all-in-one counter top vessels? Minus the $600 price tag? I like that, too.

Offline chinaski

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 441
Re: Why not ferment in the Boiling Vessel?
« Reply #19 on: September 03, 2021, 05:23:36 pm »
I might have to try this as well and add in no-chilling to the process.  A 3-gallon batch along these lines might be a nice experiment that removes quite a few time-intensive steps to the process.  Why not?

Offline ynotbrusum

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 4553
Re: Why not ferment in the Boiling Vessel?
« Reply #20 on: September 04, 2021, 04:43:48 am »
At one time Anvil sold a gasket for its kettle lid, which also had a hole for an airlock.  Most all in one systems have a gasket in the lid, so they should be adaptable to this.  I have a kegmenter that could work for this, too.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline reverseapachemaster

  • Official Poobah of No Life. (I Got Ban Hammered by Drew)
  • *********
  • Posts: 3653
    • Brain Sparging on Brewing
Re: Why not ferment in the Boiling Vessel?
« Reply #21 on: September 07, 2021, 09:04:46 pm »
It's not any different than the SS buckets sold now except you don't have a hole for an airlock or an airtight seal. Maybe that's even desirable for reducing fermentation pressure on the yeast to improve yeast character in the beer. I would be concerned that after fermentation winds down air (or bugs) will start to creep in unless the beer is racked out fairly quickly after the end of fermentation. Much easier IMO to let a $10 bucket with a sealed lid substantially reduce the risk and not worry about leaving a beer in the fermentation vessel for a few extra days...or weeks.
Heck yeah I blog about homebrewing: Brain Sparging on Brewing

Offline Oiscout

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 539
Re: Why not ferment in the Boiling Vessel?
« Reply #22 on: September 26, 2021, 07:09:46 am »
I boil and chill, no chill as well as ferment in my chapman 7 gallon kettles. They are designed for this process in mind and I love it. Definitely has cut down on issues with infections and has shortened my brew day making it more fun!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk