Author Topic: Verdant IPA  (Read 463 times)

Offline nateo

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Re: Verdant IPA
« Reply #15 on: July 21, 2021, 06:55:14 PM »
I did a red IPA a bit ago with verdant. I liked the beer, definitely true top cropper. Had more blowout than I expected.
In der Kürze liegt die Würze.

Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: Verdant IPA
« Reply #16 on: July 21, 2021, 10:49:05 PM »
I trust Denny's experience with cultures because it mirrors mine to a point.  I am a relative neophyte when it comes to modern dry yeast cultures.  I maintained my own yeast bank for so many years that never had to venture outside of it. 

Here is a photo of my old yeast bank:



Working with absolutely pure yeast cultures that are propagated aseptically leads to a warped sense of clean fermentation.  I turned 60 this year.  I am more interested in practical beer and the community that exists around it.  I am done fighting the yeast culture wars.  That being said, a true top-cropping yeast culture has an allure.  The reason why true top-cropping yeast cultures exist is because the practice naturally purifies the culture due to the fact that wild yeast and bacteria do not floc to the top.  I really appreciate everyone who contributes to this forum. Everyone has a unique brew house and brewing process.  The cultures that yield consistent fermentations across this spectrum are the cultures in which the community should invest their time.  Wyeast 1056 is a no-brainer. It is a very forgiving yeast culture that produces good beer.  Wyeast 1469 appears to be the British equivalent of Wyeast 1056 when it comes to producing consistent results, albeit beers with British signatures. Hopefully, as other contributors have alluded, Verdant IPA is the answer to those who have been looking for true British-style yeast that behaves like a small British brewery yeast.

Online tommymorris

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Re: Verdant IPA
« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2021, 11:20:43 PM »
I trust Denny's experience with cultures because it mirrors mine to a point.  I am a relative neophyte when it comes to modern dry yeast cultures.  I maintained my own yeast bank for so many years that never had to venture outside of it. 

Here is a photo of my old yeast bank:



Working with absolutely pure yeast cultures that are propagated aseptically leads to a warped sense of clean fermentation.  I turned 60 this year.  I am more interested in practical beer and the community that exists around it.  I am done fighting the yeast culture wars.  That being said, a true top-cropping yeast culture has an allure.  The reason why true top-cropping yeast cultures exist is because the practice naturally purifies the culture due to the fact that wild yeast and bacteria do not floc to the top.  I really appreciate everyone who contributes to this forum. Everyone has a unique brew house and brewing process.  The cultures that yield consistent fermentations across this spectrum are the cultures in which the community should invest their time.  Wyeast 1056 is a no-brainer. It is a very forgiving yeast culture that produces good beer.  Wyeast 1469 appears to be the British equivalent of Wyeast 1056 when it comes to producing consistent results, albeit beers with British signatures. Hopefully, as other contributors have alluded, Verdant IPA is the answer to those who have been looking for true British-style yeast that behaves like a small British brewery yeast.
I just purchased several dry yeasts hoping to find one that I like for English porters and bitters.

I purchased Verdant IPA, Nottingham & Windsor (co-pitch), Nottingham & Lalbrew London (co-pitch), and New England East Coast Ale.

I’m not sure what I am searching for. I am hoping I will know it when I taste it.

This experiment might take me a year to complete since I will be mixing in APAs and Lagers along the way.

Offline nateo

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Re: Verdant IPA
« Reply #18 on: July 22, 2021, 04:05:07 AM »
I picked up a few sachets of mangrove jack empire ale recently. The first batch turned out good. Lower attenuation than verdant, but the beer didn't taste cloying. Kept a lot of body in a low gravity stout. I'm not sure what the source is but I've read it's from Newcastle. I think verdant was originally London 3. Similar fruit flavors to my unsophisticated palate.
In der Kürze liegt die Würze.