Author Topic: Tool cart brewery  (Read 350 times)

Offline weazletoe

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Tool cart brewery
« on: July 26, 2021, 12:48:27 AM »
  Have had a lot of time here in the hospital with my wife to think and plan my brewery in the workshop my dad built for me.
 I'll drop the link here then explain.


https://www.harborfreight.com/30-in-5-drawer-mechanics-cart-green-64721.html

The very top will house all electrical components. DIN rails, SSR's, wiring, etc... On the front panel, I will pull the US General emblems and install my PID's, ampmeters, and amp control along with the various switches for relays and pump.
In the top I am going to put diamond plate over the wiring and components. I will suit my mash tun on that. On the bottom of the lid I will install a small flat screen or touch screen to display Beersmith.
 On each side of the cart I will fab and weld a metal rack for my keggles to sit on. The pump will be mounted somewhere on the bottom. Obviously, there is plenty of storage for all my brew gear and equipment. They also sell many magnetic components I'm looking at to add on for storage such as racking canes and tubing. There is also the option of a 14" side cabinet should I need more storage.
 I'm excited too get home and get to work.
 Has any seen anything similar? I'm curious to see what may have been done. So far my research has turned up nothing.
A man works hard all week, so he doesn't have to wear pants all weekend.

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Tool cart brewery
« Reply #1 on: July 26, 2021, 03:20:36 AM »
I am not clear on where the elec control box will be in relationship to the liquid vessel(s).

If I understand you correctly, you will have it/them on top of elec control box. If so, I caution you in doing this. I have spilled more than my fair share of liquid in my brewery and recommend no electric components are below liquid vessels.

If I misunderstood you and you are not placing elec components below liquid vessels please disregard.



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Offline weazletoe

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Re: Tool cart brewery
« Reply #2 on: July 26, 2021, 07:00:38 PM »
Keggles will go on each side of the cart. Mash tun will suit on top of the lid.
 Opening the lid will expose the electrical components, however I will have it sealed, should anything from the tun leak.
A man works hard all week, so he doesn't have to wear pants all weekend.

Offline Drewch

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Re: Tool cart brewery
« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2021, 08:55:35 PM »

Can you upload a sketch?  I'm not certain I'm following you text description.

You'd want to think about how heavy your mash tun will be and what reinforcing the lid might need to support that.  Also think about where the CG will wind up and how that will affect stability — the last thing you want is a full mash tun of 70C water tipping over.
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The Malt Bug Homebrewery - brasserie, cidrerie, hydromellerie - since 2019.

Offline majorvices

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Re: Tool cart brewery
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2021, 12:35:43 PM »
Hey weaze, good to see you back. I know you have been out of the loop for a while so maybe you don't know about the "all in one" electric breweries that have hit the market over the last couple of years? They are comparably cheap considering everything you basically need besides a fementer and possibly a hot liquor tank or a way to heat sparge water is included. I have the BrewZilla 110V that I brew 6-7 gallon batches in and I love it for its ease and simplicity and small footprint.

There are also 220V available in larger sizes (12 gallon batches). Might be easier than coming up with something on your own and ultimately cheaper too.