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Author Topic: Experimental Brewing podcast Episode 18 - Saison stall experiment  (Read 2875 times)

Offline dbeechum

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Re: Experimental Brewing podcast Episode 18 - Saison stall experiment
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2016, 02:19:06 pm »
I haven't. In fact I've held onto kegs of "session" strength Belgians that I've open fermented for nearly 3 years without noticing oxidation. The key is not to get lazy and get your fermenters closed when primary ends.
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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Experimental Brewing podcast Episode 18 - Saison stall experiment
« Reply #16 on: July 09, 2016, 10:18:21 am »
I haven't. In fact I've held onto kegs of "session" strength Belgians that I've open fermented for nearly 3 years without noticing oxidation. The key is not to get lazy and get your fermenters closed when primary ends.

Great!  thanks for the anecdote. I will adhere to that. My saison is slowly rising in temps up to about 73F right now on day 3-4 with foil on. Hoping to avoid the stall. Thanks Drew!

Offline Philbrew

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Re: Experimental Brewing podcast Episode 18 - Saison stall experiment
« Reply #17 on: July 09, 2016, 02:17:34 pm »
Thinking waaaay outside-the-box here, but why not experiment fermenting a 3724 saison in a slight vacuum?  That should answer the too-much-co2 vs. not-enough-o2 question.  You could somehow rig up an aquarium pump to suck with a vacuum guage* and a bleed valve to adjust the vacuum.  You would want to use a glass or SS fermenter.

Denny, I'll bet your chemist friend would have all the right equipment to try that.

*or a simple manometer.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2016, 04:48:21 pm by Philbrew »
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Offline bott scaker

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Re: Experimental Brewing podcast Episode 18 - Saison stall experiment
« Reply #18 on: July 29, 2021, 08:33:26 pm »
I brew with3724 for all my beer and I run it at 104 and it is a beast and does wonders at that temp. I let it run for 13 days and then bottle it. I love it. I use an airlock and/or a blow off into a gallon jar half filed with water and bleach. Never any issues. HG too.

Offline Cliffs

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Re: Experimental Brewing podcast Episode 18 - Saison stall experiment
« Reply #19 on: July 30, 2021, 03:24:22 pm »
for many diastatic yeasts, diastastic enzymes are produced when there is an absence of simple sugars and the presence of oxygen. Open fermentation creates these conditions. Some diastatic yeasts are compulsive enzyme producers and make them as a function of fermentation, 3711 is a good example of this, it creates them regardless of fermentation conditions. Even when fermenting a glass of sugar water it creates them. 4724 is a good example of a diastatic enzyme producer only when simple sugars are absent and oxygen is present, such as during an open primary fermentation.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2021, 04:18:43 pm by Cliffs »