Author Topic: New house, new to brewing outside  (Read 929 times)

Offline pete b

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Re: New house, new to brewing outside
« Reply #15 on: August 10, 2021, 06:43:58 pm »
i have a weird question.

i too am going to finally start brewing outside. i have a lot of trees. i'll be doing it i imagined just outside the garage on the driveway?

How do you guys keep crud from falling in? especially in say fall?
I never find that a lot of stuff finds it’s way in and I just pick out the occasional leaf or yellow jacket.
Yeah, but do the leaves add polyphenols? Is there a pH drop after the yellow jacket addition?

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I find the batches with yellow jackets give me a better buzz.
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Online Slowbrew

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Re: New house, new to brewing outside
« Reply #16 on: August 10, 2021, 09:15:44 pm »
Maple leaves and bumblebees common ingredients in my beers.  My American Wheat tap is labeled "Bumblebee Wheat" for a reason.   :)
On occasion I add a honey bee or two, but that's about it.

I have 3 very large maple trees in my backyard and Fall can make it interesting sometimes.

Paul
Where the heck are we going?  And what's with this hand basket?

Offline fredthecat

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Re: New house, new to brewing outside
« Reply #17 on: August 10, 2021, 09:52:22 pm »
Maple leaves and bumblebees common ingredients in my beers.  My American Wheat tap is labeled "Bumblebee Wheat" for a reason.   :)
On occasion I add a honey bee or two, but that's about it.

I have 3 very large maple trees in my backyard and Fall can make it interesting sometimes.

Paul






This is real and somewhat common. Naturally drinking this gives you "power".  ::)

Offline EThome

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Re: New house, new to brewing outside
« Reply #18 on: August 18, 2021, 08:34:42 pm »
1. When I started brewing in the garage, I used to direct the outlet hose into a drain in the stairwell of the walkout basement door - sometimes water the lawn and/or plants with some collected. I always hated wasting so much water. So now, I place a pump in a cooler with a 20 lb bag of ice and fill the cooler halfway with water from the hose. I hook the immersion chiller inlet hose to the pump and stick the i.c. outlet hose into the cooler. When it's time to chill, the pump gets plugged in and the water in the cooler is circulated from cooler, through chiller, and back to cooler. Adding a second 20 lb bag of ice when the first has melted, it takes me about 20 - 30 minutes to get the wort to near pitching temp.

2. Like Denny, I make the starters a day or two ahead and so the small amount of wort is still boiled on the stove in the kitchen.
Not Alien to Homebrewing

Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: New house, new to brewing outside
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2021, 07:53:58 pm »
I started using a pond pump and ice water this year, so that I could get down to lager pitching temps during the warm months.  In the past, I either did not brew during the warm months or only brewed ales at the beginning or end of the period.