Author Topic: Pouring foam from the tap.  (Read 518 times)

Offline redrocker652002

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Pouring foam from the tap.
« on: August 29, 2021, 02:45:59 pm »
Not sure how to explain this, but here goes.  My keg is a torpedo keg, and the pressure is set to about 10psi on the output.  the fridge itself is sitting at about 30 degrees on the inside, might even be a bit colder.  The beer line is runs from the tap, thru the freezer compartment, up the tower and out the tap.  I put a foam insulation in the tower similar to the stuff you use to wrap pipes outside to keep them insulated.  Random pours seem to produce a lot of foam, and some are quite normal in my mind.  I tilt the glass at a 45 degree angle to start the pour but that does not seem to help.  I have read that the line is warm going up the tower and that is what is causing it to foam up, but with the insulation would that still be the issue?  It is not really bad, maybe 1/3 of the glass or so on it's worst, but annoying at times. 

Thanks for the help.

RR

Offline Bob357

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Re: Pouring foam from the tap.
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2021, 05:38:17 pm »
Even with insulation the lines in the tower, and the faucet itself, will get warm. The insulation just slows the process. I keep a small glass on my keezer and pour 2 or 3 ounces into it before pulling a pint. This gets rid of the excess foam. When I get ready for another pint, I pour the small glass into my pint glass and then repeat the process. When I'm done with beer for the day, I drink the few ounces in the foam glass, so no beer goes to waste.
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Offline majorvices

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Re: Pouring foam from the tap.
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2021, 10:04:57 pm »
How long is your line?

Offline redrocker652002

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Re: Pouring foam from the tap.
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2021, 10:08:59 am »
How long is your line?

Per the guy at the local MoreBeer, it needed to be 5 feet.  It seems to me there is a lot of line in the fridge, but I went with what he said.

Offline goose

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Re: Pouring foam from the tap.
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2021, 02:34:22 pm »
How long is your line?

Per the guy at the local MoreBeer, it needed to be 5 feet.  It seems to me there is a lot of line in the fridge, but I went with what he said.

What is the ID (inside diameter) of the line?  That will make a difference as to how ling it needs to be.

For the record, I changed to EVA Barrier tubing a couple years ago on a recommendation of one of the people on this forum.  I use 6' of line to get to my taps in my keezer (no beer tower here) and the Duotight fittings for the keg plugs and the taps.  I get minimal foaming during my draws.  For IPA's which tend to foam a bit more, I exercise the tap valve about three times while pouring and get just the right amount of head (about a dines width) on the beer every time.
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Offline David

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Re: Pouring foam from the tap.
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2021, 12:38:21 am »
Even with insulation the lines in the tower, and the faucet itself, will get warm. The insulation just slows the process. I keep a small glass on my keezer and pour 2 or 3 ounces into it before pulling a pint. This gets rid of the excess foam. When I get ready for another pint, I pour the small glass into my pint glass and then repeat the process. When I'm done with beer for the day, I drink the few ounces in the foam glass, so no beer goes to waste.

This is what I have went to as well, I have tried the extended beer lines with zero success, one calculator i used suggested 10' of line, tried it with no difference. pulling the first 2-3 ounces of foam off at the beginning works, although I feel I am wasting a bit of beer in the process.
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Offline redrocker652002

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Re: Pouring foam from the tap.
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2021, 07:54:36 pm »
Sorry to have not replied to any of the posts here.  Not sure what the ID is of the line.  I went to the local MoreBeer place and a younger guy who was very nice helped me out. 

What I have found that has worked so far, I open the tap all the way quickly, tilt the glass at a 45 degree angle and pour.  Seems that helps a lot, and I am getting maybe a half to three quarters an inche of "head" on the glass.  I am good with that, so I am going to go with it.  Thanks guys to all who replied. 

Offline trapae

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Re: Pouring foam from the tap.
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2021, 04:47:21 am »
I had this problem until I increased my beer line length to 10 feet. Now I have a nice slow pour without any excess foam.
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Offline Kevin

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Re: Pouring foam from the tap.
« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2021, 12:57:57 pm »
How long is your line?

Per the guy at the local MoreBeer, it needed to be 5 feet.  It seems to me there is a lot of line in the fridge, but I went with what he said.

What is the ID (inside diameter) of the line?  That will make a difference as to how ling it needs to be.

For the record, I changed to EVA Barrier tubing a couple years ago on a recommendation of one of the people on this forum.  I use 6' of line to get to my taps in my keezer (no beer tower here) and the Duotight fittings for the keg plugs and the taps.  I get minimal foaming during my draws.  For IPA's which tend to foam a bit more, I exercise the tap valve about three times while pouring and get just the right amount of head (about a dines width) on the beer every time.

What is the ID of the tubing you use goose?
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Pouring foam from the tap.
« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2021, 05:11:30 pm »
What I have found that has worked so far, I open the tap all the way quickly, tilt the glass at a 45 degree angle and pour.  Seems that helps a lot, and I am getting maybe a half to three quarters an inche of "head" on the glass.  I am good with that, so I am going to go with it.  Thanks guys to all who replied.
Yeah, a big key to a good pour is to open the tap fully. It may seem counterintuitive, but if you try to slow the pour by cracking the tap partway open, you actually increase foaming by pushing beer out through the narrower opening.
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Offline Richard

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Re: Pouring foam from the tap.
« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2021, 06:23:01 pm »
...
For the record, I changed to EVA Barrier tubing a couple years ago on a recommendation of one of the people on this forum.  I use 6' of line to get to my taps in my keezer (no beer tower here) and the Duotight fittings for the keg plugs and the taps....

I took inspiration from this post by Goose in August and changed all my fittings and hoses. I went with EVA Barrier tubing, Doutight fittings and flares on the ball-lock QDs and on the gas manifold. NO MORE HOSE CLAMPS!! It cost a bit more up front but I am very happy with the results. I went with 5.5 feet of 4 mm (5/32") ID tubing on the beverage line and my foam level is just right.
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Offline goose

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Re: Pouring foam from the tap.
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2021, 08:35:00 pm »
4 mm

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