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Author Topic: American Märzen  (Read 11272 times)

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #150 on: September 11, 2021, 12:41:58 pm »
Pardon the thread drift…but since you asked:
That was a huge mistake by Boeing. Many parts did not fit the 787. Made in many countries, so total lack of QC.
A big reason why I stayed on “Big Foot”, the B-777.

Wonder if breweries suffer from QC when they partner up with someone?

edit: the B-777 flies nicer, and lands nicer than the B-787.

Thanks for an informed opinion.
Jeff Rankert
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Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #151 on: September 11, 2021, 01:53:25 pm »
Pardon the thread drift…but since you asked:
That was a huge mistake by Boeing. Many parts did not fit the 787. Made in many countries, so total lack of QC.
A big reason why I stayed on “Big Foot”, the B-777.

Wonder if breweries suffer from QC when they partner up with someone?

edit: the B-777 flies nicer, and lands nicer than the B-787.

Thanks for an informed opinion.

One more quick note on the 787...Boeing never fixed the problem with the Lithium batteries. They will catch on fire, and also will burn underwater with no oxygen source.

So, Boeing built a super thick box to contain the batteries. Their logic is if the batteries catch on fire (they did, and they will again) the fire will be contained inside the heavy duty box. Boeing never fixed the problem with the batteries, instead they addressed the symptoms.

I believe ANA and JAL had instances where emergency landings were made due to batteries on fire.

But just give me another Festbier, and I'll be a happy camper. But, no Marzen, please.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2021, 03:58:57 am by TXFlyGuy »

Offline BrewBama

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American Märzen
« Reply #152 on: September 11, 2021, 07:08:28 pm »
It's funny, here in Montana one of the breweries here's owner and head brewer is from Bavaria and was trained there. Yet, his "Oktoberfest" is totally out of style....as you can see, it's "dark brown".

https://www.bayernbrewery.com/oktoberfest

Even so, as it is malty and roasty, it's still pretty tasty for whatever it is. He makes a hefe that is the best American version I have ever tasted.

One of these types of beers I really like is Full Sail's Session Fest Beer. As someone mentioned earlier, it's a fine like between Marzen/Oktoberfest/festbier/Czech amber.

I think Oktoberfest is one of the easiest styles to brew at home. I like mine to be 1.060 OG, 1/3 each of pils, vienna, and light munich, and hopped to around 30 IBUs with nothing but Continental noble hops. Probably not to style either, but it's to my taste.

I’ve noticed that many commercial recipes fall outside the HomeBrew (BJCP) guidelines.

Just took a sneak pint of my Festbier still conditioning. It’s not quite ready yet and still a bit cloudy. …but close. It’s gonna be good!  Hopefully it’ll be ready by Sat which should have been Oktoberfest but it was cxl this yr. Incidentally, it’ll also be my birthday and we’ll do a home based O’fest with hänchen, bretzel, und pommes frites.

My American Sessionable Festbier is Brewer’s malt, Vienna, and Munich but instead of equal thirds I developed this recipe based on the Golden Ratio φ (.618034) then rounded to hit whole oz, IBU, etc.

Grain bill ratio: Pale = 1.618034, Vienna =.618034, Munich = .618034^2. I used Galena and Liberty hops.

My OG was 1.042 (so a little higher than planned) and my FG was 1.003. First time I used the Brutzyme and so far I think it’s a winner.



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: September 11, 2021, 07:12:39 pm by BrewBama »

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #153 on: September 11, 2021, 07:56:04 pm »
A long thread. Has anyone stated that Märzen is a strenght category  in germany? Has to be 13 plato, except 13.5 Plato in Bavaria. Schlenkerla Rauchbier Marzen is very smokey and dark.
Jeff Rankert
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Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline Slowbrew

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #154 on: September 12, 2021, 05:52:10 am »
How about a Honda V6 in the Saturn Vue? Do you remember that one?


I traded that car off this past Spring.  That little Vue was a great high school car.  It went to high school for 9 years.
The drive train was awesome.  16 years and no corrosion on the original exhaust.  The body was basically plastic but the frame was rusting away.

Paul
« Last Edit: September 14, 2021, 11:39:11 am by dbeechum »
Where the heck are we going?  And what's with this hand basket?

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #155 on: September 12, 2021, 06:17:41 am »
Here is a good looking recipe, and it follows what some of you are currently doing for a good Festbier:

https://byo.com/article/style-profile-dr-layout-2/

Festbier

(5 gallons/19 L, all-grain)
OG = 1.057 FG = 1.011
IBU = 20 SRM = 5 ABV = 6.1%

Ingredients

8.25 lbs. (3.7 kg) German Pilsner malt
2 lbs. (0.91 kg) German Munich malt
1.5 lbs. (0.68 kg) German Vienna malt
5 AAU German Hallertauer hops
(60 min.) (1 oz./28 g at 5% alpha acids)
0.5 oz. (14 g) German Hallertauer hops (5 min.)
Wyeast 2124 (Bohemian Lager), White Labs WLP830 (German Lager), or Fermentis Saflager W-34/70 yeast
3⁄4 cup corn sugar (if priming)

Step by Step

Two or three days before brew day, make a 2-qt. (2-L) yeast starter, aerating the wort thoroughly (preferably with oxygen) before pitching the yeast. This recipe uses reverse osmosis (RO) water. Add 1⁄4 tsp 10% phosphoric acid per 5 gallons (19 L) of brewing water, or until water measures pH 5.5 at room temperature. Add 1 tsp. calcium chloride (CaCl2) to the mash.

This recipe uses a multi-step mash with a mashout. On brew day, mash in all the grains at 131 °F (55 °C) in 15 qts. (14 L) of water and hold this temperature for 10 minutes. Raise the temperature by infusion or direct heating to 146 °F (63 °C) for 40 minutes, then to 158 °F (70 °C) for 20 minutes. Finally raise to 168 °F (76 °C) for 10 minutes to mashout, recirculating. Fly sparge with 168 °F (76 °C) water until 6.5 gallons (25 L) of wort is collected.

Boil the wort for 90 minutes, adding the hops at times indicated in the recipe. Chill to 48 °F (9 °C).

Oxygenate, then pitch the yeast starter. Ferment at 50 °F (10 °C) until fermentation is complete. Rack and lager at 33 °F (1 °C) for 14 weeks. Fine with gelatin if necessary. Prime and bottle condition, or keg and force carbonate to 2.5–2.7 volumes.

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #156 on: September 12, 2021, 06:28:52 am »
Here is a good looking recipe, and it follows what some of you are currently doing for a good Festbier:

https://byo.com/article/style-profile-dr-layout-2/

Festbier

(5 gallons/19 L, all-grain)
OG = 1.057 FG = 1.011
IBU = 20 SRM = 5 ABV = 6.1%

Ingredients

8.25 lbs. (3.7 kg) German Pilsner malt
2 lbs. (0.91 kg) German Munich malt
1.5 lbs. (0.68 kg) German Vienna malt
5 AAU German Hallertauer hops
(60 min.) (1 oz./28 g at 5% alpha acids)
0.5 oz. (14 g) German Hallertauer hops (5 min.)
Wyeast 2124 (Bohemian Lager), White Labs WLP830 (German Lager), or Fermentis Saflager W-34/70 yeast
3⁄4 cup corn sugar (if priming)

Step by Step

Two or three days before brew day, make a 2-qt. (2-L) yeast starter, aerating the wort thoroughly (preferably with oxygen) before pitching the yeast. This recipe uses reverse osmosis (RO) water. Add 1⁄4 tsp 10% phosphoric acid per 5 gallons (19 L) of brewing water, or until water measures pH 5.5 at room temperature. Add 1 tsp. calcium chloride (CaCl2) to the mash.

This recipe uses a multi-step mash with a mashout. On brew day, mash in all the grains at 131 °F (55 °C) in 15 qts. (14 L) of water and hold this temperature for 10 minutes. Raise the temperature by infusion or direct heating to 146 °F (63 °C) for 40 minutes, then to 158 °F (70 °C) for 20 minutes. Finally raise to 168 °F (76 °C) for 10 minutes to mashout, recirculating. Fly sparge with 168 °F (76 °C) water until 6.5 gallons (25 L) of wort is collected.

Boil the wort for 90 minutes, adding the hops at times indicated in the recipe. Chill to 48 °F (9 °C).

Oxygenate, then pitch the yeast starter. Ferment at 50 °F (10 °C) until fermentation is complete. Rack and lager at 33 °F (1 °C) for 14 weeks. Fine with gelatin if necessary. Prime and bottle condition, or keg and force carbonate to 2.5–2.7 volumes.

Started reading, and I said, this sounds like Gordon Strong. Opened the link, and yes it was. The water treatment was the tell.
Jeff Rankert
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BJCP National
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline fredthecat

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #157 on: September 12, 2021, 12:29:51 pm »
A long thread. Has anyone stated that Märzen is a strenght category  in germany? Has to be 13 plato, except 13.5 Plato in Bavaria. Schlenkerla Rauchbier Marzen is very smokey and dark.

ron pattinson explains how all the lager beer styles we know under many different names are simply part of a spectrum in terms of colour and strength via czech beer categories compared to german (bavarian)

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #158 on: September 12, 2021, 12:40:46 pm »
A long thread. Has anyone stated that Märzen is a strenght category  in germany? Has to be 13 plato, except 13.5 Plato in Bavaria. Schlenkerla Rauchbier Marzen is very smokey and dark.

ron pattinson explains how all the lager beer styles we know under many different names are simply part of a spectrum in terms of colour and strength via czech beer categories compared to german (bavarian)

Ron Patinson is where i learned about the the strangth category for Mäzen.
Jeff Rankert
AHA Lifetime Member
BJCP National
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline neuse

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Offline BrewNerd

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #160 on: September 14, 2021, 02:53:26 pm »
Now my enemy finally has a name.

Clearly I'm not the only one that doesn't enjoy the 'Merica version. I blame Sam Adams.

Well marketed but made for people that don't really know any better. (Personal beer snobbery turned up to 11)

Admittedly I've never been impressed by anything from Sam Adams but their Oktoberfest is straight up gross. A waste of water.

Offline Iliff Ave

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #161 on: September 14, 2021, 05:19:08 pm »
I love american brewed versions of German marzen. I dont love american brewed versions of american marzen. Quite the difference…
On Tap/Bottled: IPL, Adjunct Vienna, Golden Stout, Honey Lager
Fermenting: IPA
Up Next: mexi lager, Germerican pale ale

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #162 on: September 14, 2021, 06:13:23 pm »
The above article is interesting, and points out what is brewed in America no way resembles the German beer for Oktoberfest. With the US examples being sweet, caramel like beers. Yes, Boston Beer Company is probably to blame for this. Maybe not...unless you also blame Anheuser-Busch for Bud Light and the dumbing down of American beer consumers.

One time a Marzen beer was a personal favorite. But no longer! I have been ruined! Now a good Festbier is my choice. Almost impossible to find around here, with one notable exception. But there is no shortage of Marzen-Oktoberfest beers on the store shelf, right next to the Pumpkin Shandy.

« Last Edit: September 14, 2021, 06:15:49 pm by TXFlyGuy »

Offline Iliff Ave

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #163 on: September 14, 2021, 06:20:18 pm »
The above article is interesting, and points out what is brewed in America no way resembles the German beer for Oktoberfest. With the US examples being sweet, caramel like beers. Yes, Boston Beer Company is probably to blame for this. Maybe not...unless you also blame Anheuser-Busch for Bud Light and the dumbing down of American beer consumers.

One time a Marzen beer was a personal favorite. But no longer! I have been ruined! Now a good Festbier is my choice. Almost impossible to find around here, with one notable exception. But there is no shortage of Marzen-Oktoberfest beers on the store shelf, right next to the Pumpkin Shandy.
It’s a shame you don’t have any access to good marzen that is American made. People’s opinions get skewed by that. I prefer festbier as well
« Last Edit: September 14, 2021, 06:30:49 pm by Iliff Ave »
On Tap/Bottled: IPL, Adjunct Vienna, Golden Stout, Honey Lager
Fermenting: IPA
Up Next: mexi lager, Germerican pale ale

Offline Bel Air Brewing

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Re: American Märzen
« Reply #164 on: September 14, 2021, 08:22:28 pm »
The above article is interesting, and points out what is brewed in America no way resembles the German beer for Oktoberfest. With the US examples being sweet, caramel like beers. Yes, Boston Beer Company is probably to blame for this. Maybe not...unless you also blame Anheuser-Busch for Bud Light and the dumbing down of American beer consumers.

One time a Marzen beer was a personal favorite. But no longer! I have been ruined! Now a good Festbier is my choice. Almost impossible to find around here, with one notable exception. But there is no shortage of Marzen-Oktoberfest beers on the store shelf, right next to the Pumpkin Shandy.
It’s a shame you don’t have any access to good marzen that is American made. People’s opinions get skewed by that. I prefer festbier as well

Years ago Sammy Adams was my "go to" Oktoberfest beer. Bought many kegs of it. Many of the mainstream craft brewers have Marzen beers here.
My taste has changed, being heavily influenced by the German and Czech beers. Plus brewing our own beer makes it easy to get what is desired...unless an error is made in the brewing recipe!

Yes, a good Festbier is hard to beat!