Author Topic: Let's Talk Books!  (Read 1185 times)

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #45 on: October 01, 2021, 08:44:25 pm »


Just received my Survivables booklet and other swag from H/B school. It read 10x better in paperback than online.



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Offline jeffy

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #46 on: October 01, 2021, 08:47:41 pm »
What’s your favorite IPA recipe Denny?



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If I want a rich, full IPA, it's still my Rye IPA.  These days I often go lighter. Mecca Grade Lamonta and 8-10 C20 or 40 to 1.064 or 68.  Usually Chinook for bittering, then additions at 20, 10, 5, 3 , flameout, and dry hop. Shooting for a 1:1 BU:GU ratio.  Hop variety chosen by looking at the survivables  booklet and what I have on hand.
Interesting that you do a BU to GU ratio.  I never gave it much thought.
I was under the impression that you did FWH on your IPAs.  No?
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Offline Bilsch

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #47 on: October 01, 2021, 09:08:11 pm »
Kunze = +/-$350…but worth the money if you want the deep dive.
Mine was a gift from someone I have never met. I wouldn’t pay that much — you friggin crazy!?

What an awesome friend!

Kunze is $195 but yea still expensive. Although for what you get is very worth it.
https://www.vlb-berlin.org/en/publications/specialist-publications/kunze

Offline chinaski

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #48 on: October 01, 2021, 10:28:55 pm »
Kunze = +/-$350…but worth the money if you want the deep dive.

Mine was a gift from someone I have never met. I wouldn’t pay that much — you friggin crazy!?

Nor would I. That money would be better used on buying...BEER!
I would buy ingredients for beer.

As far as books go, as a more experienced brewer I'm often more interested personal philosophies & guiding principles of good brewers than specific techniques or recipes.  I think that there is more room for folks doing interesting things with "local" at the homebrew scale to get into a book.

Offline lupulus

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #49 on: October 02, 2021, 01:55:40 am »
Sometimes $150 is a good value and $20 is damn expensive.
You get what you pay for.

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Offline BrewBama

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #50 on: October 02, 2021, 02:06:48 am »
Sometimes $150 is a good value and $20 is damn expensive.
You get what you pay for.

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Offline fredthecat

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #51 on: October 02, 2021, 03:42:59 am »
I care about IPA.  90% of what I brew is IPA.

i always wondered, but figured so. if i could get the variety and kinds of IPAs i desired commercially, i would probably be more into them like I was in the past.

whats the other 10%?

Offline joe_meadmaker

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #52 on: October 02, 2021, 04:02:06 am »
At the moment, my interests lie in two areas.

First, I'm more interested in books that tell the story of brewing ... I'd like more books on historical brewing -- local & national traditions.  Martyn Cornell or Ron Pattinson or Andreas Krennmair type stuff.  Or think of the huge classic beer styles series (e.g., #11 Barleywine), but do each volume as an in depth exploration of a culture's brewing tradition rather than a system of styles that were only codified recently. Secrets of the Master Brewers does a good job of exploring history and applying it to the hobby, and I hear Beer Bible 2nd Ed. expands on this idea.

Second, I'm homebrewer: this is a hobby.  I'm not trying to be the next Sierra Nevada or even the next Straight to Ale or Monday Night. Even if I went pro, that market is crowded. Give me books about doing fun stuff with the ingredients around me.  Hyper-local brewing.  Like the Growing Beer podcast or The Wildcrafting Brewer by Baudar.

This is kind of where my mind is currently.  Especially the first point.  If I had to get rid of all my beer books and only keep one, it would be my copy of Amber Gold & Black by Cornell.  I only got it a couple years ago and it was pretty tough to track down.  Most I saw were used copies on Amazon, listed for more than $100!  Every once in a while one would drop down a bit.  I think I ordered, and was refunded, for 2 or 3 that got "lost" in the mail.  Finally snagged on on ebay for around $30 (I think).  Love that book!

There's so much information on how to brew on the Internet, and it's easy to find.  When I sit down with a book, I want to be told a story.

Offline TXFlyGuy

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #53 on: October 02, 2021, 11:17:26 am »
I care about IPA.  90% of what I brew is IPA.

i always wondered, but figured so. if i could get the variety and kinds of IPAs i desired commercially, i would probably be more into them like I was in the past.

whats the other 10%?

Being a true Hop Head in the 90's, IPA's were a big thing for me. But that was just a phase that I went through, later maturing into a Euro-Lager consumer over a number of years. As stated before, the influence of European brewers was heavy since my vocation had me in such places as Paris, London, Frankfurt, Munich, Amsterdam, etc., and I will throw in Tokyo also, as they can and do produce lagers every bit as good, and in some cases better, than the Germans.

But I am not alone as my close friends are in the same camp. Actually, burnt out on IPA. But that is our personal problem, and we are dealing with it.

Regarding a book, one about a brewery (s) and telling the history in depth would be of interest. I have a good video from the History Channel on Breweries in America. Very good, informative, and entertaining.
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Offline fredthecat

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #54 on: October 02, 2021, 01:10:42 pm »
well, i also wanted to ask "what is an IPA"?


id say basically any highly hopped ale. for me high IBU (over 50) but nowadays you see "ipas" with anything down to 10 IBU for juicy DDH ones.

Offline BrewBama

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Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #55 on: October 02, 2021, 01:42:26 pm »
well, i also wanted to ask "what is an IPA"?


id say basically any highly hopped ale. for me high IBU (over 50) but nowadays you see "ipas" with anything down to 10 IBU for juicy DDH ones.
Unofficial: …but I consider an IPA .7-1 BU/GU ratio. I’ve seen ‘session’ IPA(s) at a low OG but the hop ratio matched the OG to meet the IPA bitterness range.

It can cross over w/APA at .6-.8 BU/GU but more hop assertive IMO.

I usually shoot for ~.6 BU/GU for my hoppy beers …so APA for me.

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« Last Edit: October 02, 2021, 05:31:27 pm by BrewBama »
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Offline Ortizer

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #56 on: October 03, 2021, 04:48:40 pm »
I care about IPA.  90% of what I brew is IPA.

i always wondered, but figured so. if i could get the variety and kinds of IPAs i desired commercially, i would probably be more into them like I was in the past.

whats the other 10%?

Being a true Hop Head in the 90's, IPA's were a big thing for me. But that was just a phase that I went through, later maturing into a Euro-Lager consumer over a number of years. As stated before, the influence of European brewers was heavy since my vocation had me in such places as Paris, London, Frankfurt, Munich, Amsterdam, etc., and I will throw in Tokyo also, as they can and do produce lagers every bit as good, and in some cases better, than the Germans.

But I am not alone as my close friends are in the same camp. Actually, burnt out on IPA. But that is our personal problem, and we are dealing with it.

Regarding a book, one about a brewery (s) and telling the history in depth would be of interest. I have a good video from the History Channel on Breweries in America. Very good, informative, and entertaining.
History of some of the iconic old breweries might be interesting, even if they're no longer around.

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Offline denny

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #57 on: October 03, 2021, 04:52:26 pm »
I care about IPA.  90% of what I brew is IPA.

i always wondered, but figured so. if i could get the variety and kinds of IPAs i desired commercially, i would probably be more into them like I was in the past.

whats the other 10%?

Being a true Hop Head in the 90's, IPA's were a big thing for me. But that was just a phase that I went through, later maturing into a Euro-Lager consumer over a number of years. As stated before, the influence of European brewers was heavy since my vocation had me in such places as Paris, London, Frankfurt, Munich, Amsterdam, etc., and I will throw in Tokyo also, as they can and do produce lagers every bit as good, and in some cases better, than the Germans.

But I am not alone as my close friends are in the same camp. Actually, burnt out on IPA. But that is our personal problem, and we are dealing with it.

Regarding a book, one about a brewery (s) and telling the history in depth would be of interest. I have a good video from the History Channel on Breweries in America. Very good, informative, and entertaining.
History of some of the iconic old breweries might be interesting, even if they're no longer around.

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I have a book called Brewed in the Pacific Northwest that does that for PNW breweries.  Fascinating info and incredible pics.
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Offline Big_Eight

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #58 on: October 04, 2021, 07:13:41 pm »
What’s your favorite IPA recipe Denny?



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If I want a rich, full IPA, it's still my Rye IPA.  These days I often go lighter. Mecca Grade Lamonta and 8-10 C20 or 40 to 1.064 or 68.  Usually Chinook for bittering, then additions at 20, 10, 5, 3 , flameout, and dry hop. Shooting for a 1:1 BU:GU ratio.  Hop variety chosen by looking at the survivables  booklet and what I have on hand.
I've seen your recipe I need to brew it! I'm also an IPA fan and what's funny is I didn't used to be up until a couple of years ago. I'm not really a hazy guy more of an IPA pre the hazy craze.

I've been reading Ron Pattinson's book "The Homebrewers Guide to Vintage Beer" and it appears an IPA is all across the board so I would say we are talking about modern American IPA tastes in this thread lol.

Going to try a bunch of recipes from that book as it looks like they may be decent and eventually get a cask setup with a beer engine but using an aspirator with CO2 so the cask lasts longer.

Offline lupulus

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Re: Let's Talk Books!
« Reply #59 on: October 10, 2021, 07:24:14 pm »
Have been thinking about this question the last few days and one thought that came to mind is how much I miss George Fix and Greg Noonan.
Authors well read in brewing science that can process the current research and summarize it without dumbing it down are hard to find.
Scott Janish is an example on the hop area of research but there's not much new on lagers, mashing, fermentation and yeast management.
A book on Modern Lager Brewing by a Weihenstephan trained brewer would cover this need.
Cheers!




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