Author Topic: Potential O2 pickup during kegging  (Read 878 times)

Offline majorvices

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Re: Potential O2 pickup during kegging
« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2021, 07:48:45 am »
The only problem with using a tank to replace the headspace is that you have to have an extremely sensitive gauge to match the flow of the beer from the FV unless your FV can handle pressure. That's why the bag works so well. You can literally walk away without worrying about over pressurizing the FV. If you have a pressurizable FV then using a tank is a no-brainer.

One cool thing about the siphon less FVs such as the Big Mouth Bubblers is that the valve has a hole in it that will allow Co2 gas to escape through your racking hose. I usually use a "IN" black QDC connected to the FV valve with tubing then I leave some pressure on the corny I plan to rack to. The keg depressurizes through the line and out the small hole on the FV valve, purging the tubing (obviously you have to vent the keg while racking). Then I close transfer with the bag attached to blow off.

It works great.

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Potential O2 pickup during kegging
« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2021, 08:02:40 am »
The keg purge with sanitizer and remaining in keg connection through to racking works really well (especially with a cold crash).  I always use that method when pressure fermenting due to its simplicity.  I use a 14 gallon kegmenter and a 7 gallon Fermzilla All Rounder as my pressure fermentation vessels usually.   The CO2 "catch bag" approach seems fine as to cold crashing - but with spare kegs and pressure fermenting, I don't run into an implosion issue on cold crash.
 
Alternatively, (or in addition) you can simply hook up CO2 to the fermenter (or purged keg) and push beer to receiving keg through purged lines.  I use a spare keg to pressurize with CO2 and purge all lines before racking with those tubes.  It isn't perfect and I have no way of knowing/measuring the extent of minimal O2 ingress (indeed some would say the use of packaged CO2 is not pure enough relative to O2 ingress and staling over time), but it is close enough to low ox as I am willing to get on the cold side.

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Offline narvin

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Re: Potential O2 pickup during kegging
« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2021, 08:37:25 am »
I moved to keg priming and/or spunding and it makes things even easier as I don't mind transferring with the lid open and letting the fermenter backfill with air at the tail end of primary fermentation.  The reason was less about concerns while kegging, and more displeasure with the results I get when force carbonating.  The difference between homebrew and commercial brew is that commercial breweries bubble CO2 through with minimal head pressure, while at home we inject in a closed system and all the oxygen impurities in your CO2 stays in the beer.

I got this from the LODO folks but I think it makes a bigger difference in shelf life than almost all of the other tricks combined.

https://web.archive.org/web/20170316145208/https://tapintohach.com/tag/o2-in-co2-purity/
« Last Edit: October 29, 2021, 08:43:11 am by narvin »

Offline BrewBama

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Re: Potential O2 pickup during kegging
« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2021, 10:18:52 am »
Good thoughts. Thanks to those who provided them!



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